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04/13/2021 03 Strategic PrioritiesB US INE S S O F T HE C I T Y C O UNC I L YAK I M A, WAS HING T O N AG E ND A S TAT E M E NT I tem No. 3. F or Meeting of: April 13, 2021 I T E M T IT L E :S trategic Priorities S UB M IT T E D B Y:Robert Harrison, City Manager S UM M ARY E X P L ANAT I O N: S ee attached. I T E M B UD G E T E D: S T RAT E G I C P RI O RI T Y: AP P RO V E D F O R S UB M IT TAL B Y T HE C IT Y M ANAG E R RE C O M M E ND AT I O N: AT TAC HM E NT S : Description Upload Date Type Strategic Plan memo 4/9/2021 Cover Memo Strategic Plan outline 4/9/2021 Cover Memo SP 3/30/2021 Cover Memo 040721 Strategic Plan update 4/9/2021 Cover Memo 1 MEMORANDUM To: Yakima City Council Members From: Bob Harrison, City Manager Subject: April 13th Council Strategic Planning Study Session Date: April 8, 2021 Council members, Thank you for all setting aside time on April 13th to go through the important process of establishing targeted strategic priorities for the Council and the City to focus on for the next couple of years. The primary goal of the April 13th study session, which will be conducted via Zoom, will be to receive an update on the currently adopted strategic plan priorities and focus on narrowing that list to 2 to 3 priorities to focus on now. Attached is the strategic plan developed by the Council in 2019. The 10 strategic priorities that were established by the Council in 2019 can be found on page 6 of the plan document. In addition, the staff has put together a status report on the various strategic priorities that we will briefly touch on at the meeting as there is the written report included in your packets. The April 13th strategic planning study session has been designed to as efficiently and effectively identify and reach Council consensus on narrowing the strategic priorities that best represent the immediate needs of the Yakima community. Communications & Public Affairs Director Randy Beehler will assist in facilitating the Council's process. At the April 13th study session, you will be engaged in a process to, 1) determine two or three strategic priorities in which to focus efforts, 2) determine a common understanding of the priorities, and, 3) determine indicators to measure progress toward achieving the priorities. An outline of the April 13th Council strategic planning study session is attached and will be used as a guide for discussion during the study session. Please contact me or Randy Beehler if you have questions or need additional information about the Council’s strategic planning study session prior to April 13th. 2 Yakima City Council Strategic Planning Study Session Outline Tuesday, April 13th, 2021 2:00 pm Introduction Review of 2019-2021 City of Yakima Strategic Plan Zero in on 2-3 strategic priorities Discussion and development of common understanding and indicators to measure progress toward achieving these priorities Review of outcomes of the study session Adjournment 3 ADOPTED SEPTEMBER 12, 2018 UPDATED FEBRUARY 2019 2019-2021 STRATEGIC PLAN FOR THE CITY OF YAKIMA, WASHINGTON . PRESENTED BY: THE YAKIMA CITY COUNCIL 4 2019-2021 STRATEGIC PLAN FOR THE CITY OF YAKIMA, WASHINGTON 1 2019-2021 STRATEGIC PLAN FOR THE CITY OF YAKIMA, WASHINGTON TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE 1. COMMUNITY OVERVIEW 2 2. ORGANIZATION CHART 3 3. BACKGROUND 4 4. MISSION STATEMENT 5 5. COUNCIL PRIORITIES 6 6. COUNCIL COMMITTEES 7 7. ROLE OF CITY MANAGER’S OFFICE 15 5 2019-2021 STRATEGIC PLAN FOR THE CITY OF YAKIMA, WASHINGTON 2 Community Overview Yakima is located in the south central region of Washington State and covers about 28 square miles. Sunshine is the norm with 270 to 300 blue sky days per year. The area enjoys four separate and distinct seasons with the summers being hot and dry while the winters are cool with light snowfall. Yakima is the largest city in Yakima County, serves as the county seat, and, with a population of more than 94,000, is the 11th largest city in Washington State. Most of the people who founded Yakima were of European decent, although significant numbers of African-Americans and Asian-Americans homesteaded in the area as well. Recently, the Yakima Valley has experienced a large influx of Latino immigrants, which now account for approximately 45% of the population in Yakima County. Today, the Yakima community enjoys a rich mixture of people from many cultural and ethnic backgrounds. 74% of the population has at least a high school diploma and 18% has a Bachelor’s degree or higher. The median annual household income was estimated to be $43,956 in 2016. The cost of living in Yakima is below the national average at 95% and the state does not require income tax. The average sales price of a home is $192,000 and the average commuting time to work is about 15 minutes. Beyond K through 12, the area boasts a private technical college, a community college, a university, an osteopathic medical school, and a number of vocational education programs. Yakima has been the cultural, business, educational, health services, and governmental focal point of the Central Washington region since it was founded more than 125 years ago. Originally built along the then-new Northern Pacific Railway company line, Yakima has grown from its agricultural roots into a vibrant, diverse, metropolitan city. With a rich history and a bright future, Yakima is the Heart of Central Washington. Yakima's economy has traditionally revolved around agriculture and a wide variety of crops are grown in the Yakima Valley. These include more than 30 varieties of fruit (apples, cherries, peaches, pears, nectarines, apricots and berries) and vegetables (such as asparagus and eggplant). Not many people know that the region produces about 75% of all the hops (a key ingredient in beer) grown in the United States. While Yakima still relies on agriculture to drive its economy, over 250 manufacturing firms call the area home and produce a variety of products including aircraft parts, wood products, plastic products, recreational vehicles, and communications technology. Healthcare plays a large role in the Valley as represented by five hospitals and over 400 first-class physicians covering 36 specialties. Clinics provide a full range of treatment with open heart surgery, neurosurgery, and cancer care among them. Tourism is the fastest growing segment of the Yakima economy. More than 70 wineries are located in the Valley and regularly draw visitors to sample and buy internaEonally renowned varietals. MulEple craF breweries and disElleries uElize home-grown products in their unique offerings. Outdoor recreaEon, including water and snow skiing, fishing, boaEng, hiking, horseback riding, and white water raFing, also makes Yakima a favorite desEnaEon for people from throughout the Northwest and around the world. Finally, Yakima is home to a minor league baseball team (the Yakima Pippins, a member of the West Coast League), NAPB championship basketball team (Yakima Sunkings), and hosts numerous regional sports tournaments (baseball, basketball, soFball and soccer, for example). 6 2019-2021 STRATEGIC PLAN FOR THE CITY OF YAKIMA, WASHINGTON 3 CITY OF Yakima 2019 ORGANIZATIONAL CHART CITY OF YAKIMA CONSTITUENTS CITY COUNCIL CITY MANAGER Assistant City Manager Departments City Administration Community Development Human Resources Police Legal Fire Municipal Court Airport Finance Public Works 7 2019-2021 STRATEGIC PLAN FOR THE CITY OF YAKIMA, WASHINGTON 4 1. BACKGROUND This document updates the 2015 Strategic Plan. The foundaEon document idenEfied five prioriEes, which are reaffirmed in this document: • Economic Development • Public Safety • Neighborhood Building (Improving the built environment) • Partnership Development • Public Trust and Accountability This document also builds on previously established criEcal steps to ensure alignment between staff acEons and Council prioriEes: • Each City department will establish specific action-oriented goals, work activities, and performance measures to align with and make progress on the Strategic Priorities. • City Council policy initiatives and discussions will focus on the Strategic Priorities. • Senior management and employee performance evaluations will be linked with the Strategic Priorities. • Performance measures will be monitored and reported on to hold ourselves accountable for making measureable progress in achieving the strategic commitments. • Communicate quarterly and annually to the City Council and public through a Strategic Plan Progress Report. • Periodically review the Strategic Plan to ensure that it continues to focus City government resources on the issues most important to the community. 8 2019-2021 STRATEGIC PLAN FOR THE CITY OF YAKIMA, WASHINGTON 5 2. MISSION STATEMENT On March 17, 2018, the Yakima City Council adopted the following mission statement to declare the manner in which municipal government shall provide services: TO PROVIDE OUTSTANDING SERVICES THAT MEET THE COMMUNITY’S NEEDS. TO GOVERN RESPONSIBLY BY EFFECTIVELY MANAGING AND PROTECTING PUBLIC RESOURCES. TO BUILD TRUST IN GOVERNMENT THROUGH OPENNESS, DIVERSE LEADERSHIP, AND COMMUNICATION. TO ENSURE THE SAFETY OF OUR RESIDENTS THROUGH RESPONSIBLE 21ST CENTURY POLICING. TO SUPPORT THE YOUTH OF OUR COMMUNITY SO THAT THEY CAN REACH THEIR FULL POTENTIAL. TO STRATEGICALLY FOCUS ON ENHANCING YAKIMA’S QUALITY OF LIFE. 9 2019-2021 STRATEGIC PLAN FOR THE CITY OF YAKIMA, WASHINGTON 6 3. 2019-2021 COUNCIL PRIORITIES PRIORITY FOR 2019-2021 Council Committee Assigned 1. Fiscal Sustainability All Committees 2. Main/Arterial Street Development Economic Development 3. Community Policing Public Safety 4. Safe Routes to Schools Public Safety 5. Youth Development Healthy Communities 6. Mill Site Development Partnership 7. Homelessness/Affordable Housing Healthy Communities 8. Airport Expansion Partnership 9. City Facilities (pools and community centers) Capital Facilities Ad Hoc 10. Downtown Destination Economic Development PRIORITY FOR 2018-2019 Council Committee Assigned 1. Main street business development Economic Development 2. Community policing Public Safety 3. Safe routes to all elementary schools Public Safety 4. Youth development Healthy Communities 5. Mill site Development Partnership 6. YMCA Aquatic Center Partnership 7. MLK Pool Healthy Communities 8. Downtown Central Plaza Economic Development 10 2019-2021 STRATEGIC PLAN FOR THE CITY OF YAKIMA, WASHINGTON 7 4. COUNCIL COMMITTEES A. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT B. HEALTHY COMMUNITIES C. PARTNERSHIP D. PUBLIC SAFETY 11 2019-2021 STRATEGIC PLAN FOR THE CITY OF YAKIMA, WASHINGTON 8 2019-2021 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE Holly Cousens, Dulce Gutierrez, Jason White, Carmen Mendez (alt) PRIORITY: DOWNTOWN DESTINATION AND MAIN STREET DEVELOPMENT GOAL This Committee seeks to: Between 2019-2021 to accomplish this goal, the Committee will: This Committee will review, consider and evaluate policies using two perspectives: The City will foster a dynamic and diverse economy for Yakima through collaboration and partnerships with other public, private, and nonprofit entities. The City will aggressively support economic development efforts that advance local development, quality, living wage jobs to ensure a diverse economic base, a resilient and growing City tax base, and long-term economic vitality for the City of Yakima 1. Promote and recommend policies that stimulate and support business development and growth along main arterial roads 2. Monitor policies and activities created to simulate growth along City main streets 3. Promote and market the downtown core as a destination for economic development 1. Benchmarking through a. Collecting data b. Analyzing data c. Planning d. Implementation 2. Equity Reports as Reference Tool 3. Input from Community Integration Committee This Committee will discuss, analyze, consider, review data, input and ideas on the following topics: Code Social well-being Low-income Housing Homeless Equity Public Works Parking Airport Wastewater Treatment Other FOUNDATIONS OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 12 2019-2021 STRATEGIC PLAN FOR THE CITY OF YAKIMA, WASHINGTON 9 1. Build upon existing signature businesses and industries by attracting complimentary business clusters in healthcare, business and professional services, industrial machinery, food processing and distribution to expand and strengthen the local economy. 2. Continue the physical revitalization of the City to promote a strong first impression and community attractiveness to businesses. 3. Build on the community’s history, heritage, natural resources, and livability to promote Yakima as a tourist and business destination. 4. Collaborate with downtown businesses to foster the growth and enhancement of the downtown as a destination through development of a Downtown Master Plan, enhanced public safety, customer-friendly parking, marketing, additional special events, an attractive physical environment, pedestrian-oriented design standards, and review of regulations to encourage investment while ensuring health and safety. 5. Execute a plan for the environmental restoration and infrastructure development of the Mill Site to position the Mill Site as a prime economic development site for private sector development. 6. Optimize business development, capital improvements, and additional commercial air service at the Yakima Airport. 7. Community arts, culture, and recreational opportunities are valued by both residents and prospective employers as a measure of the community’s quality of life. Accordingly, these sectors of the community must be enhanced. 8. Increase City involvement and partnerships with the Chamber, Visitors & Convention Bureau, Rural Community Development Resources, Central Washington State Fair Board, Yakima Sports Commission, Capitol Theatre, New Vision and other private entities to stimulate economic development. 9. Support ongoing activities with wine, craft brews, and cider producers. 10. Ensure a balanced regulatory environment that facilitates business retention and growth. 13 2019-2021 STRATEGIC PLAN FOR THE CITY OF YAKIMA, WASHINGTON 10 2019-2021 HEALTHY COMMUNITIES AND NEIGHBORHOOD BUILDING COMMITTEE Kathy Coffey, Kay Funk, Jason White, Brad Hill (alt) PRIORITY: YOUTH DEVELOPMENT + HOMELESSNESS + AFFORDABLE HOUSING GOAL This Committee seeks to: Between 2019-2021 to accomplish this goal, the Committee will: This Committee will review, consider and evaluate policies using two perspectives: To promote a built environment that is safe and attractive now and in the future, and the City will also promote healthy growth and rewarding activities. 1. Recommend policies that promote youth well-being through comprehensive programs provided by partnerships between city, district, non-profits, universities, civic and faith-based organizations 2. Facilitate after school program information to all families 3. Secure resources for quality after school programs so that they can serve more children 4. Monitor and support programming that provides assistance to homeless individuals; review, evaluate and recommend policies that enable increased development of affordable housing 1. Benchmarking through a. Collecting data b. Analyzing data c. Planning d. Implementation 2. Equity Reports as Reference Tool 3. Input from Community Integration Committee This Committee will discuss, analyze, consider, review data, input and ideas on the following topics: Homeless Resources / Code Issues / Code After School Programs Network Enforcement OTHER: SOZO, Aquatic Housing (Affordable, Traffic abatement Center, Blue Zones, Low-Income, Senior, Road and Sidewalk Repairs Equity Study, ONDS) East YMCA FOUNDATIONS OF HEALTHY COMMUNITIES 14 2019-2021 STRATEGIC PLAN FOR THE CITY OF YAKIMA, WASHINGTON 11 1. Enhance the appearance of the City through: •Community-based clean-up programs •Design and signage standards •Comprehensive graffiti abatement program •Support upgrade and modernization of city facilities that serve youth, seniors and Families 2. Advocate for new and expanded youth programs, especially in the after school hours and school vacations. 3. Engage in critical dialogue relating to the delivery of services to the homeless and recommend policies, programs, and possible collaborated efforts to the full Council. 4. Evaluate policies that would help support the development of new housing stock, especially affordable housing. 15 2019-2021 STRATEGIC PLAN FOR THE CITY OF YAKIMA, WASHINGTON 12 2019-2021 PARTNERSHIP COMMITTEE Kathy Coffey, Brad Hill, Carmen Mendez, Holly Cousens (alt) PRIORITY: MILL DEVELOPMENT + YMCA AQUATIC CENTER DEVELOPMENT GOAL This Committee seeks to: Between 2019-2021 to accomplish this goal, the Committee will: This Committee will review, consider and evaluate policies using two perspectives: The City of Yakima will build cooperative and reciprocal partnerships with local, regional, state, federal, international, non-profit, and private entities, to enhance the vitality and quality of life of city residents, businesses and guests to leverage resources with other organizations. 1. Recommend policies needed to further large collaborative projects that enhance economic vitality, public safety, and community/ neighborhood health and well-being 2. Set policies that lead to the successful development of the Mill site 3. Lead a community-wide approach to upgrade and enhance facilities at the Yakima Airport 1. Benchmarking through a. Collecting data b. Analyzing data c. Planning d. Implementation 2. Equity Reports as Reference Tool 3. Input from Community Integration Committee This Committee will discuss, analyze, consider, review data, input and ideas on the following topics: YMCA Aquatic Center Mill site partnerships Port District Schools Equity Wastewater Code Roads, sidewalks, and streets Treatment Homelessness Airport Partnerships Policies and Rules of Procedure 16 2019-2021 STRATEGIC PLAN FOR THE CITY OF YAKIMA, WASHINGTON 13 FOUNDATIONS OF PARTNERSHIP 1. Work with Yakima County, State of Washington, and Federal Government to secure funding and approval for necessary transportation and infrastructure improvements to enhance access to the Mill Site. 2. Create a legislative and administrative strategy and partnership with the Association of Washington Cities. 3. Partner with the Downtown Merchants, Capitol Theatre, Visitors & Convention Bureau, Central Washington State Fair Board, and media in creating more community events and activities that foster more community and downtown engagement, involvement, and pride. 4. Partner with the Hispanic and Latino communities to address the needs and expectations of the growing Hispanic/Latino population in the community. 5. Enhance volunteer opportunities for community groups. 6. Ensure the City Council is represented and/or meets regularly with the governing board of the following Yakima organizations: •Yakima County •Hispanic Chamber of Commerce •Yakima School District •YCDA—New Vision •Yakima Chamber of Commerce •Pacific Northwest University of Health Sciences •Capitol Theatre •Heritage University •Central Washington State Fair Board •Yakima Regional Hospital •Memorial Hospital •Service Clubs •Yakima Valley Community College •Sister City program 17 2019-2021 STRATEGIC PLAN FOR THE CITY OF YAKIMA, WASHINGTON 14 2019-2021 PUBLIC SAFETY COMMITTEE Holly Cousens, Dulce Gutiérrez , Kay Funk, Brad Hill (alt) PRIORITY: COMMUNITY POLICING + SAFE ROUTES TO ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS GOAL This Committee seeks to: Mission Statement for 2019-2021 This Committee will review, consider and evaluate policies using two perspectives: The City is committed to providing a safe and secure environment for its resident, businesses and visitors to ensure healthy and vital neighborhoods free of crime. We are committed to increasing community based partnerships and crime prevention, fire and medical safety, code enforcement, emergency preparedness, 21st century policing and community integration. The Public Safety Committee recognizes that City staff have specialized expertise in solving critical safety problems. This Committee will propose to Council policies which will support collaboration with local school districts to develop long-range plans to improve pedestrian and vehicle safety near local elementary schools; and utilization of the six pillars of 21st century policing 1. Benchmarking through a. Collecting data b. Analyzing data c. Planning d. Implementation 2. Equity Reports as Reference Tool 3. Input from Community Integration Committee This Committee will discuss, analyze, consider, review data, input and ideas on the following topics: Safe Routes to School Fire Auxiliary Homelessness (Council priority) City Codes Emergency Community Policing Emergency Medical Services Management (Co) (Council priority) Brown-outs Police Auxiliary Domestic Violence Traffic / Roads Anti-gang efforts 18 2019-2021 STRATEGIC PLAN FOR THE CITY OF YAKIMA, WASHINGTON 15 FOUNDATIONS OF PUBLIC SAFETY 1. Promote and increase community based partnerships in crime prevention through: •Neighborhood Block Watch •Crime Stoppers •Neighborhood Associations •Schools •Businesses •Service Clubs 2. Ensure appropriate service levels for public safety services as the community population grows. 3. Enhance downtown safety by operating visible and routine police bike and foot patrols. 4. Establish an effective graffiti abatement program focused on notification, clean-up, investigation, and enforcement. 5. Improve neighborhood safety by installing more street lights along arterial streets and poorly lighted areas. 6. Strengthen cooperation and partnership with Yakima County Sheriff's Office and add officers to the federal/state Violent Crime Task Force. 19 2019-2021 STRATEGIC PLAN FOR THE CITY OF YAKIMA, WASHINGTON 16 5. 2019-2021 ROLE OF THE CITY MANAGER’S OFFICE The City Manager’s Office is responsible for the daily administraEon of the City’s systems and programs. While the Council’s focus is on major policy decisions, including adopEng strategic prioriEes and a budget to support those prioriEes, the City Manager’s Office focus is largely internal and administraEve; ensuring that Council prioriEes are addressed. The City Manager’s Office is commiUed to… IMPLEMENTING STRATEGIES THAT ARE COUNCIL LED FOCUSING ON ESSENTIAL SERVICES IN AN INCLUSIVE, TRANSPARENT, COMMUNITY DRIVEN MANNER; AND DOING SO IN A WAY THAT IMPROVES THE FINANCIAL WELL BEING OF THE CITY’S GENERAL FUND. To support this objecEve and the Council’s established mission, the City Manager’s Office has the following vision: • Implement Council prioriEes by following Council direcEon, ensuring trust, accountability and integraEon • Provide outstanding, inclusive, equitable Customer Service • Regain financial stability and when goals are met, prioriEze public infrastructure improvements, personnel and technology/innovaEon investments • Implement acEviEes and services centered around needs of vulnerable populaEons including housing, public safety and clean city approaches • Maintain personnel levels to 2018 baseline and adopt proacEve succession planning strategies • Create and implement a comprehensive Public Communication Strategy and function to inform and encourage participation in civic affairs for the entire community • Enhance public engagement in the City by: o •Supporting more community events o •Celebrating the community’s rich history and heritage o •Conducting community surveys/focus groups o •Leveraging media partnerships o •Promoting volunteer opportunities (e.g. Block Watch, etc.) • Increase community involvement through the creation of volunteer opportunities 20 Strategic Priorities update April 2021 1. Fiscal Sustainability Progress on General Fund reserves: • The 2019 audited financials (CAFR) realized a 17.1% reserve (General Fund’s fund balance $10,757,521 million is 17.1% of Actual General Fund Expenses of $62,987,402). • The preliminary (pre-audit) 2020 CAFR has a 20.9% reserve (General Fund’s fund balance $13,172,381 million is 20.9% of Actual General Fund Expenses of $62,929,015). Several challenges remain, including: • Ongoing funding of public safety vehicle capital replacement • Mill site spending to qualify $1M annual LIFT matching • Parks budget negatively impacted by debt obligation through 2042 • Economic development budget • Grant writing budget • IT, COBAN, ERP systems • While Sales Tax and Property Tax appear stable, Lodging Tax is not yet up to 2019 levels, as are other smaller revenues such as Gambling Tax and Building Permits 2. Main/Arterial Street Development N. 1st St. - Phase 1 of the North 1st Street Revitalization project was completed in 2019 and extended from SR-12 to N St. in 2019. The project included reconstruction and improvement consisting of the removal and replacement of the roadway, curb, gutter and sidewalk, sidewalk ADA ramps, upgrades of the aging water and sewer systems, addition of a stormwater system, new street lighting and other related amenities. The cost of Phase 1 was approximately $4.3 million and was funded by a $2.718 million federal grant the City received in 2015 and a $1 million Transportation Improvement Board (TIB) grant it received in 2018. Additional funding was provided by the City’s utilities for their respective projects and the use of Gas Tax Funds. Phase 2 began in April 2021 and will extend from N Street to J Street providing the same improvements as was conducted in Phase 1. It is anticipated that Phase 2 will be completed in October 2021 at a cost of $2.8 million. It will be funded utilizing Transportation Benefit District (TBD) funds and capital funds from water and stormwater. Spring Creek Road - Phase 1 of the Spring Creek Road improvement project was completed in 2019 to accommodate the new SOZO Sports Complex. The roadway improvement project consisted of road widening, curb, gutter, sidewalk, storm and sanitary sewers, roadway lighting and the installation of a bike lane. Phase 1 started at S. 38th Avenue and Sorenson Road, continued to north on S. 36th Avenue to Spring Creek Road and ended at the northern entrance to the SOZO Sports Complex at a cost of $1,058,052.42. A SIED grant/loan and utility funds covered the cost of this phase of construction. Phase 2 will begin in May 2021 and will consist of similar roadway 21 improvements as in Phase 1. Phase 2 will continue from the ending point up 36th Avenue to Spring Creek Road and continue to S. 48th & Washington Avenues. A new traffic signal will be installed at Washington Ave. near 48th Ave. as part of this project along with wetland mitigation. The project is currently out to bid and is estimated to cost $4 million and is planned to be completed in October 2021. A SIED grant/loan has been secured in the amount of $2 million to go toward funding the project. The City will be required to bond for the remaining amount. River Rd. - The River Road improvement project was completed in 2019 in coordination with the completion of the new YMCA Aquatics/Fitness Center at Chesterley Park. The project extended from 40th Avenue to 34th Avenue consisting of widening the roadway to three lanes to add a turn lane, the addition of curb, gutter and sidewalk to accommodate the safety of pedestrians and bicyclists, and the addition of storm drainage, sanitary sewer, and street lighting. In addition, Pacific Power relocated power transmission and distribution poles and lines to the backside of the new sidewalks while communication companies relocated some of the overhead facilities to underground conduits, improving the surrounding aesthetics. The cost was approximately $900,000 and was primarily funded by a $1,000,000 Yakima County SIED Board grant/loan. Transportation Benefit District (TBD) funds were used to finance the loan payments of the SIED Loan. In addition, the Wastewater/Stormwater Division contributed funds toward the project for infrastructure improvements. Any remaining funds will be directly applied to the roundabout construction project at 34th Avenue & Fruitvale Blvd., which connects River Road to 34th Avenue. This project will be conducted in 2022. The Mill Site municipal solid waste (MSW) project is currently underway to clear out woody debris and municipal solid waste and will be completed by June 2021. The estimated cost is $13.1 million. This will provide for the extension of Bravo Company Blvd., which will ultimately tie into the proposed East-West Corridor and into H Street. 3. Community Policing An update will be provided at Tuesday’s meeting. 4. Safe Routes to Schools a. In 2018, the City identified and estimated the cost to install missing sidewalks within a ½ -mile radius of the City’s 16 elementary schools at $81.4 million. To reduce the overwhelming costs of needed sidewalks within a ½ -mile radius of each elementary school, City Council directed staff in 2019 to focus on identifying one street east to west and one street north to south on which to install sidewalks. Street/Sidewalks have been identified; $5.1 million. b. In 2020, worked closely with the Yakima School District to identify the district’s Top 5 safety concerns; total cost $2.1 million 1) Robertson Elementary 2) Hoover Elementary 3) Nob Hill Elementary 4) Ridgeview Elementary 5) Lewis & Clark Middle School 22 c. Between 2018 and 2021, the City conducted the following sidewalk repair projects utilizing Transportation Benefit District (TBD) funding: 1) Naches Ave. (Walnut to Pacific) – removed problematic trees, repaired sidewalks and added ADA ramps 2) 4th Street (Walnut to Pacific) - removed problematic trees, replanted acceptable trees, repaired sidewalks and added ADA ramps 3) Mead Ave (27th Ave. to 28th Ave.) - removed problematic trees, replanted acceptable trees, repaired sidewalks and added ADA ramps d. In 2017, the City began a citywide effort to upgrade its high-pressure sodium street lights to LED in order to provide the community better quality lighting, reduce crimes of opportunity, improve security for our residents, and reduce energy costs by 50% to 60%. This project was completed in 2020. e. Transit Sidewalk project – Between 2017 and 2019, new sidewalk was installed along the east side of 40th Ave. north of Chestnut. This was done to compliment the installation of a crosswalk at the intersection of 40th Avenue and Chestnut. In 2021, work is in progress to install a sidewalk along the west side of 16th Avenue north of Fruitvale Blvd. f. Adams/Washington School Sidewalks (2018). Installed sidewalk, ADA-compliant sidewalk ramps and crosswalks at various locations around the schools; relocated the school flashers to cover a larger area. The total project cost was $380,000; Safe Routes to Schools grant was $357,000. g. Garfield Elementary Safety Improvements (2019). This project involved installing sidewalk on the east side of Campbell Lane from Jerome Avenue to Willow Street and installed sidewalk on the west side of 6th Avenue from Jerome Avenue to Willow Street, as well as installed ADA-compliant ramps and crosswalks at other various locations. In addition, revised Jerome and Fairbanks into one-way streets at the request of the school. The amount of the Safe Routes to Schools grant was $180,000. h. Complete Streets Project (2019). This project involved installing a sidewalk on the south side of Swan Avenue from McGuiness Park to Campbell Lane (tie into sidewalk installed as part of Garfield SRTS project); installed sidewalk on Race Street between 8th Street and Naches Avenue (tie into sidewalk installed as part of Adams/Washington SRTS project); installed sidewalk on the south side of Prasch Avenue from 20th Avenue to 16th Avenue (tie into sidewalk installed as part of the McClure Elementary SRTS project); installed sidewalk on the south side of Viola from 10th Avenue to 4th Avenue (adjacent to Hoover Elementary); installed sidewalk on the west side of Powerhouse Road from Robertson Elementary to Englewood Avenue. The project cost $500,000 and was funded with a Transportation Improvement Board grant. 23 i. Hoover Elementary (2019). Worked closely with the Yakima School District to revise S. 6th Ave and S. 4th Ave to one-way streets in order to provide increased safety to the kids as they were dropped off and picked up each day; did not have to walk between vehicles. j. McClure Elementary School Vicinity Safety Improvements (2020). This project involved installing sidewalk on Lila Avenue between 24th Avenue and Karr Avenue, installing sidewalk on the south side of Prasch Avenue from 22nd Avenue to 20th Avenue, filling in missing sections of sidewalk at various locations on Viola Avenue between 24th Avenue and 20th Avenue, installing ADA-compliant sidewalk curb ramps and crosswalks at various location near the school, and installing a Rapid Rectangular Flashing Beacon at the school crossing located at 24th Avenue and Viola Avenue. Right-of-way acquisition was required. The Safe Routes to School Grant amount was $270,000. k. McClure Elementary School Safety Improvements (2021). This project will make various pedestrian safety improvements in the vicinity of McClure Elementary School, such as replacing and constructing sidewalk. The project will also include construction of a sidewalk on Lila Avenue between Karr Avenue and 24th Avenue. Funding for this project is from a Safe Routes to School grant in the amount of $270,000. Design funds were obligated on July 3, 2018. The required preliminary engineering surveying has been completed and design of the project is nearly complete. Right-of-way acquisition continues, with construction beginning in 2021. l. Both the 2021-2023 state House and Senate proposed transportation budgets included an appropriation to the WSDOT Safe Routes to School Program sufficient to provide $510,000 in funding to the City for the Robertson Elementary School Safety Improvements Project. This had been identified by the Yakima School District as the top project in which to address due to safety concerns. 5. Youth Development Currently, Parks & Recreation operates an after-school program at Roosevelt Elementary School with 100 students called “Beyond the Bell.” City Council recently directed staff to move the Beyond the Bell program to the Washington Fruit Community Center (WFCC). YPAL has since relocated to Madison House. With Parks & Rec staff managing the WFCC, they will coordinate with other programs and non-profit organizations in order to provide programs and activities to the Miller Park neighborhood. A public meeting will be conducted as soon as COVID restrictions are lifted with the neighborhood to gain valuable input as to what they would like to see in programming and activities. 6. Mill Site Development Redevelopment of the Yakima Mill Site has long been an economic development priority for the City Council. The project includes a variety of partners necessary to accomplish the transformation of this site to an employment center with new streets and infrastructure that support new development. The partnership includes Yakima County, Washington State Department of Transportation, Washington State Department of 24 Ecology, Yakima County Development Association, Yakima Greenway and the ownership group. The City has utilized the LIFT program and local resources to support preliminary engineering and design, environmental review, geotechnical investigation, traffic analysis, utility planning and site planning. In 2019, the City was finally able to acquire right-of-way for the new road corridors on the site from the ownership group. In 2020, the City began remediation of the former landfill under the road prism to allow road construction. Road construction should begin in 2022 and continue in a phased approach through 2024. Meanwhile, Yakima County is actively working on its road construction in Terrace Heights. WSDOT has begun the preliminary engineering for the interchange modifications, which are funded by the Washington State Legislature and targeted for construction in approximately 2025. In 2022-2023 the City should focus on: • A financial strategy for completing the City street and infrastructure project as well as support our partners in a successful construction strategy to stay on time and on budget. • Environmental review under NEPA is expected in late 2021 or early 2022, which will create the opportunity for road development. • Environmental investigation of the remaining 15 acres of the landfill will also occur. • Continued partnership with DOE on landfill remediation • Continuing inter-agency cooperation with Yakima County and WSDOT to completion of roadway network • Engage the ownership group to ensure long-range plans for compatibility • Community involvement regarding neighborhood improvements The Mill Site Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) project is currently underway to clear out woody debris and municipal solid waste and will be completed by June 2021. The estimated cost is $13.1 million. This will provide for the extension of Bravo Company Blvd., which will ultimately tie into the proposed East-West Corridor and into H St. These are the figures that were presented on March 23rd to Council in the Mill Site Development update Resources – secured • State Ecology grant $8.7M • County SIED grant $1.5 • Utility Funds matching for LIFT funds up to $2 M • LIFT – up to $3.5M • LIFT Matching $1 million/yr to 2036 Resources – potential • Senator Murray request $19.8M • EDA Public Works Grant $4.5 • INFRA grant 25 • TIB • ARPA (pending eligibility guidelines) 7. Homelessness/Affordable Housing The Council has implemented a number of key initiatives related to Affordable Housing since 2019. On February 12, 2019, the City Council had a study session on Affordable Housing. Staff presented a white paper with background data and policy options for consideration. The City Council endorsed all policy options presented during that study session. In short, the Council gave broad support to encouraging new construction, creating a more flexible regulatory environment, identifying and reducing barriers, streamlining permitting process, encouraging retention of existing housing units, and other strategies. The Washington State Legislature in 2019 approved an array of bills and programs to encourage Affordable Housing. The City of Yakima took advantage of HB 1406, which diverts a portion of the state sales tax to municipal government for housing; HB 1923 funded a Housing Action Plan and resulted in broad updates being adopted to the City’s zoning, subdivision and environmental requirements. The Housing Action Plan, funded under HB 1923, will be presented to City Council in May 2021 and includes a series of recommendations. The City receives Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) and HOME funds from HUD. Each year, the City Council approves a funding plan to allocate resources that support new construction of low-to-moderate income housing units (such as the Armory project and Bicycle Apartments) as well as home repairs for senior and disabled residents. The City of Yakima created a new inter-department program called “Clean City”, which provides outreach, refuse response, graffiti paint out, code enforcement, legal and police department involvement in matters related to homeless encampments, and other issues. This program is funded from a franchise fee applied to the commercial waste system in Yakima (Yakima Waste). The Yakima Homeless Coalition was moved from the Yakima Valley Conference of Governments (YVCOG) to Yakima County in 2019. The coalition was reorganized and has developed a professional approach to addressing homeless issues and funding in Yakima County. The City continues to support Camp Hope, which is located on City-owned property adjacent to the wastewater treatment plant. Camp Hope provides approximately 200 beds to homeless people in a supervised dormitory setting. 8. Airport Expansion Business Development: The Yakima Air Terminal-McAllister Field continues to expand business development opportunities by working closely with private developers. In 2015, the Airport Master Plan identified the need for additional hangar space on airport property in order to meet increasing aircraft storage demands. In 2020, the airport worked with McCormick Air Center to develop eight additional T-hangars. The project was completed in the fall of 2020. 26 Additionally, the airport worked closely with McCormick Air Center to assist in the relocation of the Department of Natural Resources – Aviation Division to the Yakima Airport. This opportunity allowed three UH-1H Huey helicopters to be based in the Yakima Valley in order to quickly respond to wildfires. In 2021, the DNR will expand its presence at the airport by temporarily relocating four additional aircraft with supporting air/ground crews, which will bring approximately 60 employees to support operations. Finally, the airport worked with Cub Crafters to secure an additional aircraft manufacturing facility in order to meet current customer demands. Cub Crafters has since relocated its aircraft completion center to the new facility where customers work with Cub Crafters employees during the final assembly stages. Capital Improvements: Recently, Yakima Air Terminal-McAllister Field implemented various capital improvement projects to address aging infrastructure. In 2020, the airport rehabilitated its primary runway (9/27). The asphalt was crack and fog sealed, runway edge lights were replaced, and visual navigation aids and airfield markings were updated. Total cost for the project was $1.4 million, 100% of which was paid through a grant. Additionally, the airport worked closely with the Yakima Fire Department and the Federal Aviation Administration in order to replace the airport’s Aircraft Rescue and Fire Fighting apparatus (ARFF). This new fire apparatus was delivered in 2021 and has the capacity to accommodate Boeing 737-type aircraft. Total cost for the project was $1 million, of which 90% was paid through a grant from the FAA and the remaining 10% was paid from the airport’s passenger facility charge program. Commercial Air Service: Air service development continues to be a high priority within the Yakima Valley. Although the COVID-19 pandemic has caused many airlines to dramatically reduce flight schedules, the transportation industry is beginning to witness a rebound in passenger activities. With the anticipation of air travel returning to pre-COVID-19 levels in the next two years, the City of Yakima launched a survey focused on collecting information from businesses and passengers. Through close partnership with Yakima County Development Association, the Greater Yakima Valley Chamber of Commerce, and Yakima Valley Tourism, the survey yielded responses from over 205 businesses with over 12,000 employees and indicated a strong desire for additional air service. As the airport finalizes this data, it will work closely in developing public-private partnerships in order to attract additional airlines or destinations in the Yakima Valley. 9. City Facilities (pools and community centers) Proposed MLK Jr. Outdoor Pool – In 2018, a feasibility study was conducted by Counsilman-Hunsaker for an outdoor community swimming pool at Martin Luther King, Jr. Park. With input from the Community Swimming Pool Ad Hoc Committee, the City Council determined that the best location of the pool would be at Martin Luther King, Jr. Park. In order for the City to proceed with the proposed project and be eligible for any possible grant funding for the outdoor swimming pool, a defined scope of work would first need to be developed consisting of actual designs with estimated operational and 27 construction costs. Counsilman–Hunsaker, a leading expert in pool evaluations and designs, identified three possible schematic designs for the community outdoor pool, provided estimated costs to construct each of the designs and estimated operational costs for each pool. Construction costs ranged from $7.4 million to $11.3 million and operating expenses from $310,000 to $428,000 per year. Assessment of both Franklin and Lions pools were completed by KDA Architects. City Council gave staff a directive to conduct the assessments for significant upgrades, including upgrades similar to the new YMCA indoor pool. KDA Architects is to present three plans: 1) Upgrade current facilities without expanding footprint 2) Upgrade/Expand facilities footprint (medium level) 3) Significantly upgrade/expand facilities - possible new facilities to become “gems of the City” that the community can be proud of Funding was to be pursued through state funding/grants, service clubs, and private donors. KDA was in the process of conducting assessments of both the Henry Beauchamp Community Center and the Washington Fruit Community Center. City Council gave staff the directive to conduct assessments to determine upgrades and needs for future growth for 20 to 30 years. KDA Architects is to present three plans: 1) Upgrade current facilities without expanding footprint 2) Upgrade/Expand facilities footprint (medium level) 3) Significantly upgrade/expand facilities - possible new facilities to become “gems of the City” that the community can be proud of Funding was to be pursued through state funding/grants, service clubs, and private donors. However, the COVID-19 crisis hit in March of 2020 and has delayed the ability to hold public meetings to gain valuable input from the community. As soon as COVID restrictions are lifted, staff and KDA will schedule public meetings at both community centers. 10. Downtown Destination To assist in the accomplishment of this goal, the Yakima City Council, at a 7/30/2019 City Council study session regarding the Downtown Master Plan, requested that the Downtown Plan Implementation Committee of 2013 be reconvened. It was agreed that the committee should be broadened to become more diverse than in 2013. An organizational meeting was held on November 19, 2019. The group agreed to continue meeting and to help reassess projects or portions of the downtown plan that may be viable. The first meeting was held on December 2, 2019. A total of 20 downtown representatives attended, along with Councilmember Brad Hill and several city staff members. The group elected Andrew Holt as the facilitator. The group formed a series of subcommittees to study various topics including: 28 • Alleyways/Art • Safety • Traffic Flow • Incentives • Co-op/ Market • Retail Market Study The group continued to meet, with Council member Brad Hill and /or Patricia Byers in attendance at various meetings (January 13, 2020, February 10, 2020, and March 19, 2020) and held various subcommittee meetings. Largely due to COVID restrictions, the group has not met since March 2020. Downtown Association of Yakima (DAY) continues to be a vital component. COVID restrictions have severely hampered engagement and economic recovery during the last year. 29