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10/16/2012 19A Council General Information BUSINESS OF THE CITY COUNCIL YAKIMA, WASHINGTON AGENDA STATEMENT �� Item No. For Meeting of: October 16, 2012 ITEM TITLE: Council General Information SUBMITTED BY: CONTACT PERSON/TELEPHONE: SUMMARY EXPLANATION: 1. Thank you letter from Susan Kerns regarding Senior Repair Program 2. City Meeting Schedule for week of October 15 -22, 2012 3. Preliminary Future Activities Calendar as of October 15, 2012 4. Preliminary Council Agenda 5. 2012 Study Session Schedule 6. Association of Washington Cities Legislative information Resolution Ordinance Other (specify) Contract: Mail to: Contract Term: Amount: Expiration Date: Insurance Required? No Funding Source: Phone: APPROVED FOR SUBMITTAL: City Manager STAFF RECOMMENDATION: BOARD /COMMISSION RECOMMENDATION: ATTACHMENTS: Click to download ❑ info packet RECEIVED CITY OF YAKIMA (Q 4 2-0/2- OCT o 5 2012 OFFICE OF CITY COUNCIL City of Yakima Council Members: I would like to thank the City of Yakima for its recent work on my home at 1416 Roosevelt. The new paint job is a pleasure to look at every day. It had been 30 years since its last paint job and it was sorely needed. The additional work is greatly appreciated also. The new concrete steps are much safer and no longer considered a liability to the insurance company. I now have running water in my bathroom sink and kitchen sink. The use of the dumpster was a great assistance in finally cleaning out my garage. The help of this program was the only way my house would have been improved. I am low income and could not repair these items on my own. I hope the city continues to receive funding for seniors and disabled people. Without this help my house was uninsurable by all insurance companies. I now can get insurance. My street and neighborhood look much nicer with my beautiful new paintjob! Than[so much. Susan Kerns q ( t.00e-..-Aid * oLtk fl L A a C10 CITY MEETING SCHEDULE For October 15, 2012 — October 22, 2012 Please note: Meetings are subject to change Monday, October 15 10:00 a.m. City Council Media Briefing — Council Chambers 11:00 a.m. Bid Opening — Council Chambers Tuesday, October 16 10:00 a.m. County Commissioners Agenda Meeting — Council Chambers 5:30 p.m. City Council Executive Session — Council Chambers 6:00 p.m. City Council Meeting — Council Chambers Wednesday, October 17 12:00 p.m. PAL Board Meeting — PAL Center 3:30 p.m. Arts Commission Meeting — CED Conference Room Thursday, October 18 9:00 a.m. Hearing Examiner — Council Chambers Monday, October 22 12:00 p.m. Greenway Board Meeting — Greenway Visitors Center 12:00 p.m. Capitol Theatre Board Meeting — Capitol Theatre Office Of Mayor /City Councit Preliminary Future Activities Calendar Please Note: Meetings are subject to change :.p. w: . .,, 4 ", �. s`W Nfe``ttri`''�dca �, - .-, - ':Meetin` fly ;3` t t ni gi �. :.. : p .. :, , •.. ,. 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Oct. 15 10:00 a.m. City Council Media Briefing Scheduled Meeting Bristol Council Chambers Tue. Oct. 16 12:00 p.m. Miscellaneous Issues Scheduled Meeting Cawley, Adkison, TBD Ettl 5:30 p m City Council Executive Scheduled Meeting Council Council Chambers Session 6:00 p.m. City Council Meeting Scheduled Meeting Council Council Chambers Wed. Oct. 17 12:00 p m. PAL Board Meeting Board Meeting Coffey PAL Center 3.30 ..m. Arts Commission Scheduled Meetin. Adkison CED Conference Room Thur. Oct. 18 10:00 a.m. SIED Board Meetin• Board Meeting Coffey New Vision Office Sat. Oct. 20 8:30 a M. Welcome WA Science Scheduled Event Cawley Convention Center Teachers Mon. Oct. 22 12:00 p m. Greenway Board Meeting Board Meeting Ettl Greenway Visitors Center 00 p.m. Capitol Theatre Board Board Meeting Bristol Capitol Theatre Meetins Tue. Oct. 23 10:00 a.m. City Council Study Session Scheduled Meeting Council Council Chambers 12:00 p.m. Miscellaneous Issues Scheduled Meeting Cawley, Adkison, TBD Lover Wed. Oct. 24 5:30 p m. Historic Preservation Scheduled Meeting Bristol Council Chambers Commission Thur. Oct. 25 10:00 a.m. Yakima Regional Public Scheduled Meeting Bristol Convention Center Facilities District Sat. Oct. 27 9:00 a.m. Soro•timist Welcome Scheduled Event Cawley Hilton Mon. Oct. 29 6:00 p.m. Welcome WA Service Scheduled Event Cawley Convention Center Cor•s Tue. Oct. 30 10.00 a m. City Council Study Session Scheduled Meeting Council Council Chambers - 00 p.m. Miscellaneous Issues Scheduled Meeting Adkison, Cawley, TBD Coffe Thur. Nov. 1 4 p m. GFI Steering Committee Scheduled Meeting Coffey, Adkison, CWCMH Meeting Ettl 6.00 p.m. Regional Fire Authority Scheduled Meeting Cawley, Coffey, Station 95 Adkison Fri. Nov. 2 8.00 a.m. Sister City Meeting Scheduled Meeting Adkison CED Conference Room Mon. Nov. 5 10:00 a.m. City Council Media Briefing Scheduled Meeting Cawley Council Chambers Tue. Nov. 6 12:00 p.m. Miscellaneous Issues Scheduled Meeting Cawley TBD 5 p.m (T) City Council Executive Scheduled Meeting Council Council Chambers Session 6:00 p.m. City Council Meeting Scheduled Meeting Council Council Chambers Thur. Nov. 8 1.00 p.m. Harman Center Board Board Meeting Adkison Harman Center Meeting 1 30 p.m. Yakima Regional Clean Air Scheduled Meeting Lover Council Chambers Meeting 2:00 p.m. GFI Executive Committee Scheduled Meeting Ettl, Coffey, Mayor's Office Meeti Adkison PRELIMINARY FUTURE COUNCIL AGENDA October 23 10:00 a.m. City Council Study Session — Council Chambers October 30 10:00 a.m. City Council Study Session — Council Chambers November 6 (T) 5:00 p.m. Executive Session — Council Chambers 6:00 p.m. Business Meeting — Council Chambers • American Indian Heritage Month proclamation • Recognize retiring City employee Rick Schuknecht • Fire Department Commendation Recognition Award • Recognize LDS Volunteer Group • Resolution adopting the proposed 2013 Annual Action Plan • A Resolution Authorizing an Agreement with Yakima County, through the Office of Aging and Long Term Care (ALTC) for the City of Yakima Day Break Adult Day Care and Respite Services Program at the Harman Center • A Resolution Authorizing an Agreement with Yakima County, through the Office of Aging and Long Term Care (ALTC) for the Geriatric Preventative Foot Care Services Program • Resolution amending the Wastewater Division's contract with Pharmer Engineering • 3rd Quarter engineering report • Consideration of Resolution authorizing annual renewal of the City Manager's authority to settle any claims against or by the City of Yakima in an amount of $100,000 or Tess, and to execute all documents necessary to the resolution or settlement of such claims 10/10/2012 5,18 PM • YV -Tech agreement that allows them to use certain areas of Station 95 • Resolution naming Apple Valley Kiwanis Skate Park in Memory of Ron Bonlender 7:00 p.m. Public Hearings — Council Chambers 10/10/2012 5•18 PM 2012 STUDY SESSION SCHEDULE Council Chambers 10:00 a.m. • October 23 Strategic priorities 2013 budget Water rates for 2013 October 30 Trek Yakima Metropolitan Parks District Downtown development standards November 13 Gang Free Initiative TBD North 1 Street and signage issues 10/10/2012 517 PM c °t ; orbe r ; 2 0 1 2 P , { I ASSOCIATION OF WASHINGTON Liquor privatization im acts p • On June 1, 2012, private retailers began selling liquor as Respondents indicate that they need additional police, a result of the passage of Initiative 1183. Though some more technical assistance to deal with the impacts of citizens are pleased to shop at grocery or convenience privatization, and increased involvement in licensing store and purchase distilled spirits, others have concerns decisions. Survey results show cities are still working with of the impacts on public safety and underage drinking. LCB, but need more support. Additionally, many stores under 10,000 square feet were grandfathered in and allowed to sell liquor, increasing the Compliance checks density of availability. LCB reported no significant changes in the rate of compliance with private retailers as compared to Even before the initiative was approved by voters, some the previous system of state -owned stores. However, expressed concerns about increased alcohol consumption compliance rates do not reflect the issue of theft and by adults and minors and what public safety impacts would increases in consumption. The Department of Revenue arise. reported an increase in liquor sales stating that a total of Although it is too early to fully evaluate the public safety 10.6 million liters of spirits were purchased during May, impacts of liquor privatization, AWC recently asked June and July of 2012, compared to 9.5 million liters for ors and police chiefs what they are seeing in their the same period in 2011. communities. Here is what they said. The main concern reported by cities is theft of liquor. Websites exist that detail how to avoid getting caught by Police chiefs disassembling the sensory devices attached to the bottles • 63% report an increase in liquor theft and advocate running from the store because of many • 30% report an increase in alcohol related crimes near stores' "no pursuit policy ". grocery stores • 25% said they need more support from the Liquor Are more, smaller stores still possible? Control Board (LCB) for enforcement The liquor control board is in the process of examining the 40% said they needed more officers for liquor increased density of liquor stores and in the rule - making • enforcement and alcohol related crimes process for defining a "trade area" as required in the initiative. LCB is also considering new rules to allow home Mayors & city managers delivery of liquor. In response to a survey question regarding the biggest public safety challenge the city faces with privatization What cities need: • of liquor, the main concern is theft from stores, both Restore diverted liquor taxes and reinstate the reported and unreported. Others echoed that the historical local share of excess liquor revenue reduction of revenue sharing by the state directly impacts • Address concern about changes in public safety costs the city's ability to fund law enforcement. Reports of including prevention and enforcement organized thefts of liquor from stores in addition to • Set rulemaking for displays and placement of liquor in •rage patrons stealing liquor have become regular stores L„,-mes in police reports. '�i Association of Washington Cities • 1076 Franklin St SE, Olympia,WA 98501 • awcnet.org O c t o b e r 2 0 1 2 AWC's 2013 preliminary major priorities _ASSOCIATION_ Fiscal sustainability economic 0 WAS I N GTO N CiTiES development service provision Ensure fiscal sustainability and Enhance service provision flexibility • Allow cities to be more flexible and • Restore diverted liquor revenue and retain responsive to fiscal challenges, such as existing state - shared city revenues during managing personnel costs. these fiscally challenging times. • Fund critical mandates like municipal • Preserve current local revenue authorities stormwater and refrain from adding any like local business licensing taxes and seek new unfunded or underfunded mandates. to develop new options. • Strengthen public records efforts by curbing abusive requests. Foster and invest in infrastructure and economic Details about how cities want these addressed development are being worked out over the remainder of 2012, after which priorities will be affirmed and • Collaborate with the state to increase advanced. multi -modal transportation funding and expand sustainable revenue options. • Authorize tax increment financing and ' • AWC contact fine -tune other tools that help foster job Dave Williams creation and retention in cities. "Director of State : Federal Relations • Keep funding for critical infrastructure davew @awcnet.org ' ' programs like the Public Works Trust Fund (360) 753 4137 and don't divert capital investment dollars to the general fund. Association of Washington Cities • 1.076 Franklin St.SE, Olympia,WA 9850 • awcnet.org i S e pt �e m b e �r 2 0 1 2 ITN AWC's ASSOCIATION 2013 reform agenda OF WASHINGTON c i-� i E s- to i n g shape 1 Cities need budget relief Below is a list of just some of the cost-savings/reform g g As cities and towns across the state continue to face significant ideas we are exploring: budget challenges AWC is working to identify ways the state • Further delay the deadline or modify the mandate for legislature might be able to help lessen those challenges. Beyond conversion of local government fleets to alternative fuel working to maintain and restore state shared revenues we will vehicles (current deadline is 2018). also pursue cost savings and efficiency measures that could • Put in place new guidelines for binding interest arbitration help cities balance their budgets now and into the future.We • Eliminate "Buildable Lands" reporting requirements (currently are continually seeking ideas from our members and we have required of cities in in King, Pierce, Snohomish, Kitsap, recently shared some of those ideas with the Governor's staff Thurston and Clark counties) upon their request. - • Reaffirm local authority to set standards for public defenders Over the coming weeks we intend to collect more new ideas, (requires the legislature to clarify a recent Supreme Court refine old ones and work with our Legislative Committee and rule) Board of Directors to identify a list of items that we can translate • Liability reform - Limit joint liability for public entities, into a bill or bills for the legislature to consider. We'll also partner especially in the context of proposed expanded wrongful with the Association of Counties on these efforts as we have in death claimants and damages.Work to amend the law so that 1 -e past. juries know if a person involved in an injury accident was e expect the bill(s) to generate discussion among legislators wearing a seatbelt. and other interests and we will continue to stress that many of • Amend the frequency of required financial audits for cities the "easy" things like delaying various mandates, have already and towns with records of clean audits (Legislation may not been done. Our successful 201 1 efforts (SSB 661 1) resulted in a be required, could be done by the state auditor. Current number of mandate delays. auditor and both candidates have expressed support for this In 2012, we focused less on mandates and more on efforts idea) to protect existing revenues and seek authorization for new • Amend or eliminate requirement for cities to send pavement ones.While less successful than in 201 I, we were able to find condition reports to WSDOT agreement (E2SSB 6406) on several reforms dealing with • Amend or eliminate requirement for cities to submit hotel/ the State Environmental Policy Act and Municipal Stormwater motel tax expenditure reports to Department of Commerce. Permits. To view a complete list of mandates or potentially Talk to legislators unnecessary reports under consideration at AWC, please Moving into 2013 every idea is likely to be opposed by numerous go to www.awcnet.org /portals /0 /documents /legislative/ interests but it's incumbent upon legislators to seriously consider ofmmartybrownunfundedmandatelist .pdf. ways they can help local governments save money now.As you talk to legislators and candidates remind them that the state has Share your ideas been cutting revenues to cities at the same time that we have If you have additional ideas that you would like AWC to consider been hit hard by the downturn in the economy.We need their please send them to DaveCatterson at davec @awcnet.org. help in finding ways to cut our costs so that we can manage ' own budgets more effectively and be in a better position to tribute to the ongoing recovery of the economy in our state. - ■ ._ Association of Washington Cities • 1076 Franklin St SE, Olympia,WA 98501 • awcnet.org . October 2 01 2 AssO,clA-rl S trengthenin g : t -- - .- -- OF GT WASHINON C f l r i .E -- - Rec or d s Act ;� u r - L l .: �.` Jit . �. yes Cities support transparent government and continue to seek the best ways to use $t Q1` , • ? ; _ #, . 1', s� , ,, limited resources to meet this commitment. The vast majority of requesters make r 7 - r,� \tit 7t }`, 1f ,J A ,1 al q , " A,t,. narrow, focused requests or are willing to work with agencies to get the exact z , F ;f ,( `` F: K- , � ., } ,,fry ra n information they need. There are, however, a rowin number of requesters who rs`'h -'� rfrr �{ r `" ''c "` / ' , "` ' �'' ( T64 �,u 1631{ 1'iul^�C l , fhl 0 , I 1)Y 5' .'r ' t ' At'' , ul 'r },, A fr '"'� '� • monopolize resources with broad, voluminous or harassing requests that do not ,, r , ., xr :; w 1 provide a public benefit proportionate to the costs to the public to fulfil these �, r �,('f r� ` ` ' l - ' t ' ' ' ' ` ' , f P P P P p , 4 k ' , € x 4 « 4' t �, ir� -r 4 opportunities strengthen �) ^) fFd y J 1 7 l „ 1ti� { r JH I CI l ` a . requests. We must reduce the o ortunities for abuses in order to stren t hen U i access to public records for citizens. , 6 1f4 i` � , '1 L.1''It *' {�I: :1'0,10%44 7 '':'., -4, r1, - , I (Da : G, `Ikic I viv,3F4 q�b } rlY �i`4la l' s'7 , i r t 7 „i i$ dl� r , bul r f � ( 4I.l ) .'S s v,„'s ! What cities need y i ' r 4 ; "2 + ! { 7 r � , `: z1C ' ' `,, ivi a C pfl -I ,q-,, •. t TV g 1? r 1, ,1 The Public Records Act provi strong protections for public access to records `0, , x , 1 .1 T X �i'`t � L, I ,, y and penalties for agencies and officials who fail comply. Unfortunately, the law l':-.4.06:1 f ri , ` ` ,' � - yl,, 2 s ` JI 4 z - lacks similar provisions to protect the public from those who use the law for r { r r'' ,' 1 ,- '' } ' financial) motivated punitive or retributive requests. Cities are working hard to ` � ' ` 4'' r 1 `r`1�A- ,i " Y , P 4 g � ' ,'"",f.,`„4 r � �>r I - , � , comply with the law but need tools to protect essential services from those who I ' ti ' ,� l `t � T ,x ,1",0 z P� 'r' � r.- r ,ryc � i , YI I� r S I r n r r �� � 1 u cl I (r,1� iir `����1 l' use records requests to drain government resources. Cities need: i f , � ,� � ., '0 .�`, 4t -r ,, a�, � , r A mechanism to address financially motivated, punitive, or retributive V 7. ? ,�,� i t 4a 1, F Currently �1J requests � + �+ requestors have no obligation to cooperate with an agency or clarify y'' � - t � , Y 4 g P g cY Y H , � f � � , � � � �� , or narrow a request. Agencies have the full responsibility to comply, even when V-,,,,,,„-ti, ` � °fir x l �r r � "� �i r ;a 4 4 �4;` ' , %- ,Jf t t. i ;. Z Icfri4l i k1? F 4, r faced with the types of requests illustrated here. Allowing agencies to seek a ;- ' -- iv. .1 �, �r U , , t " £a- w u„ civil injunction in Superior Court would permit the circumstances - including the i , ki ,7 - :ya, ' I �, ,l W x fl '` l3 r x3's k., , +ar k # ,7 a�alY�^Y a � y „c 'W€ 3y� �'Ft�S?� y yM � l a , } ` µ aM'�� public interest -- to be considered by a judge. This tool would provide a necessary ; (sir), i , ,4 4 7 > 11 =hp , r r backstop against truly abusive requestors. s „. ". ,fi , ,.r s r ; ' . ,,x ,.0 ,a h ∎ Ix ,r 4 S , k { h l l p dr rbi,u 3 n V 1 a A +� 1 d ' , 3 A, 1 ra ''...,,sV,4 � q ` y- 7 C(Y .f rY i„ M1 t I pl� � l'�Ir ' S' z A way to protect essential services � {m ,�,, 4 � ��>t , , � r,-� , �� 1 � � a m �, , � p ��� ry � ? � .. t`�r1 "ricl�� n7,)�' " t R'el r ° € `" dJ �' The Public Records Act allows agencies to adopt and enforce reasonable �3 �y :� rules and regulations... to prevent excessive interference with other essential f ri t`Sr'`Y ` % { ` ,' °' 3 { , ' s r '11 n "reasonable" t � �i�'-'; 11Pl rbf Fi � i;' CI R , A ¢vi , functions... However, reasonable is undefined, and cities need better guidance .�� �f � �, �,� A � , rr � � � �,• . on what they may do to protect essential services and stilt comply with the intent �P , sr '�'`'`,fi> t 7 ''�" ' 'n' - ` l " 1 4 ` - of the law. State law should be changed to specifically allow agencies to adopt a ,V t , , 55 policy limiting the number of hours devoted to public records requests to prevent 1-v,,„--,-,-., 7 r r , i . 71 ° , , ' 1` 4,, , ` t' .., „ .„ , r ` ,.h, c ti ` 4q Fp I r, I 4 �, � r ' 1 iji,r -' - ,11 ,,i a 4 t� ,, ' ,, (I ' L! 1 s) ' ] ,-, r 0 a excessive interference with other essential functions. This change would be , P , 1 l �� ,. r i r �4= �1 �{�' ' r + r l �,,, ' l, ry ` r �� �W""'a 3t �� 7�ar4a especially helpful to small jurisdictions with very limited budgets and staff. ',- ir t� °�` �' 1� t r'wa ,�; ,�, S w, .- I,,f , r P,; , (11 ;, I S M ,3 f �,r'r,17,,n.'y1a/ r �t }J 15 •( . i , fh 10 0 ` fir § - b, a1 «s.T^ q aY s � ' , .9„ y t +^ ' or , e , t €'..4i Authority to stop subsidizing requests made for commercial purposes s,;1 F4 t) � , , � � ' G J� , 7' i u� ' f rI ��F :� e,.. . ,, 2 ? Some jurisdictions are seeing a rise in requests made for commercial purposes, VA'At 7 , 3,0 ���ua3� 5 ” , 4 �)rr'd .11W c & particularly from out of state companies. These companies are being subsidized „ , f , cr ' , ' ! , 1 14 , by Washington taxpayers when the get information at no cost and use it to make - 1, ,,% y,04,.., s , Q a l� ,, ' Y g they g ~no r F r f-1 t �. a profit. With our limited resources, cities need to be able to recoup some of the ,,4 t' r 1 ,Ir0;colr. � �w � I � + costs for providing this service to commercial requestors. c� .,;�r,, ,, ,,4 ' "A f � � , , ' ,H AWC contacts ziCandiceBocl , candiceb @awcnet.org. Serena Dotty, serenadCyawcnet : org r Legislative &; Poticy'Advocate.. Legislative -6 Pol cy- Analyst Association ofWashington Cities • 1076 Franklin St SE, Olympia, WA 98501 • awcnet.org S e� .t- o m b a r 2-'0,1 � 2 ASSOCIATION ' OF ' °, WA SH I N,GTU;N C T i ., S LodgingTax Background ,; > ; t In 2007, the Legislature granted new uses for hotel - motel, or lodging, What is t h e l odging tax? tax revenue, including: The todgtngtax, also known as the Funding the operation of special events and /or festivals designed local hotel motet tax, is appltetl to to attract tourists (as opposed to "marketing "); and charges for lodging a t hotels, motels, • private campground RV parks, a • Funding the operatio and capital expenditures of tourism- similar _. acilities for stays less than related facilities owned by non -profit organizations. one month All cities and counties ; The legislation contained a sunset (or expiration) date of June 30, that levy'the fax have adop`ted 2013. Unless the Legislature extends or removes the sunset, the maximum rate of 2 .The tax is expanded uses listed above are scheduled to expire on that date. credited agains the state retail sales tax Cities a may also Levy 1 2012 Legislation Likely an additional 2% lodging sales t AWC has heard from many cities across the state that strongly r' Approximately 150 cities levy the support these expanded uses and have taken advantage of the basic 'Lodging, tax and 110 levy the flexibility. During the 2012 legislative session, AWC supported a additional tax Combined, these taxes bill that extended the expiration date to December 31, 2014 and generated approximately $36 million modified some of the reporting requirements. The bill was met with =. for cities in 2011 . strong opposition from the hotel industry and failed. Similar legislation likely will be introduced in the 2013 legislative session. 2013 Expenditures Unless the legislature changes or removes the June 30 expiration AWC contacts date, cities may not be able to make awards for these expanded uses r Victori L a incoln ' ` n after June 30, 2013. We've heard that some cities are considering expending money for these uses before the June 30 deadline even Legislative & _t Policy A dvocate though the event occurs after that date —and others may make • vtctorialCawcnet org n awards contingent on a legislative change. We strongly encourage you ' , ,-„,:,..,..i.:7,•:,,,,,,,, , ` ' to discuss these options with legal counsel before moving forward. We Need Your Help Serena Dotty $ L & P o l icy Analy Cities again are likely to face opposition in removing or extending the sunset date. If flexibility in using this revenue is important to your ,. serenad®awcnet org r , city, please share local examples with your Legislators. Association of Washington Ci • 1076 Franklin St SE, Olympia,WA ',..,,.•-, u'� � a,CNA98501 • awcnet.org Se. pct `em °'ber 2'012 Working effectively with your OATION . OF l egistator an vice versa! �kr As a local elected or appointed official, you're all about How do legislators know what your city needs or doesn't community service, fixing things, pulling the community want? You tell them. Repeat it and remain consistent together and moving forward. (nothing ensures failure like officials from the same city Your legislators are about the same things. disagreeing about your asks or positions on legislation). As much time and effort as you spend in your There is a role for everyone in working with your communities being elected officials, it's also part of your legislators. Don't assume that is just the job of the mayor job description to communicate with legislators - and or city manager. Mayors, councilmembers and city staff they need to hear from you. can all be helpful in communicating what's important to your city. Take some time to coordinate so that everyone Spend time communicating with legislators. They can can work together to take advantage of opportunities to impact you unintentionally if they don't know what is share your message with your legislators. going on in your city. When they are well informed, they can be very helpful! Lobbying 101 - helpful hints Frame your issues as stories that are Get to know and meet with your supported with data legislators when they're not in Olympia Legislators are usually generalists and need to remember That's when they have time. During a legislative session, a little about a lot of things. you may be lucky to get 15 minutes. At home, there's This upcoming session in particular will be difficult - time to dig into your subjects. their budget woes are significant. Programs and Legislators rarely turn down invitations to have coffee things you need may go away. Project funding will be • or lunch - especially during election season (every limited. two years for representatives /four years for senators) • Start collecting and share stories, impacts and lists Listen to what they care about as you share your of programs that are important to your community. interests. Legislators start making decisions about cuts and Consider regularly scheduled meetings, separately or priorities sooner than you may think! • as a delegation - preferably some of each. • Local stories stick in a legislator's mind and make good points during debates - both in private and on • You don't have to contribute to their campaigns - the House or Senate floor. they want to hear your issues. Sometime, you might consider hosting a gathering for coffee or in a meeting Communicate regularly with your space to help them hear from constituents. legislators during session • Even though the Legislature is partisan, make and • By phone or e-mail works well - especially if they or maintain contact with your legislators - regardless of their legislative aides know you. (Legislative aides are party. 85% of legislation passed is unanimous. Many of the gatekeepers for their bosses - knowing and being the solutions you need aren't partisan wedge issues. respectful of them can help you get and maintain • In areas where legislators represent multiple access to their bosses!) local governments, look for shared interests • Consider regularly scheduled conference calls with and perspectives with other jurisdictions and some or all of your legislators. Some cities do these on communicate those. a weekly or bi- weekly basis - frequently less than 'h hour and in the morning. • The more you make an effort to communicate, the more your legislators will seek your input and try to address your needs! continued Association of Washington Cities • 1076 Franklin St SE; Olympia,WA 98501 • awcnet.org Adopt a legislative package for your city Use your friends in your community It's a great way to tell your legislators, citizens and Success in Olympia often requires help from others or a businesses what's important to you! coalition. • Have the council adopt it - adds credibility and maybe Is there a chamber with a similar position? A • even gets some local press attention. community or labor group? Talk to them /they can • Keep it short (if more than a page, it might not get help. Pile on! looked at). Legislators keep track -of how many contacts they - -- -- • Adopt it before the legislative session begins, and get on a particular issue - pro and con. If you need explain it to your legislators and others in your something,- you and your friends need to remind community. Be ready to dearly what you want, them. Once isn't always enough. Keep the calls • why and who if anyone is opposed. coming.` >4 • If you want or need a capital project, include it along Finally...Always say thank you with your policy priorities. How often do you get thanked? Thank your legislators • Look at AWC's legislative package and priorities - whether or not you always agree with them. Consider (available in draft form by early October) and ways to recognize and publicize their successes for your consider copying it along with some local examples. community. • Remember - everything that's important takes time! There's nothing wrong with putting your priorities Cities conducting lobbying together and teeing it up for next time around. activities may need to report to Know which committee your legislators the PDC (and legislators in neighboring Cities and ''towns :that conduct lobbying activities either communities) serve on through -a contract lobbyist or directly with in -house If you need a project or a change,in a statute, it first goes staff or city council members need to report to the through a committee (if you need help understanding Public Disclosure Commission. Those that hire a contract committees and who's on them, contact AWC). lobbyist must file a report. If you have in -house staff or elected officials who spend more than four days a quarter • Your legislator or one from a nearby community can directly lobbying the legislature, you need to complete a be your champion. report. For more information on reporting requirements • Alternatively, your legislator can find a champion and how to file a report visit the PDC's website at www. for you if he or she doesn't serve on a particular pdc.wa.gov/ filers /page.aspx ?c1= 0Etc2= 137Etc3 =138 or committee. - review the PDC's Public Agency Lobbying handbook at www.pdc.wa.gov/ archive /filerassistance /manuals/ pdf /2009 /2010ManL5.pdf. Cities and towns that fail to comply with reporting requirements on lobbying activities may be subject to penalties from the PDC. • Association ofWashington Cities • 1076 Franklin St SE, Olympia, WA 98501 • awcnet:org • l 1 tEh ASSOCIATION BillTracker * OF " "ES No more sifting through hundreds of bills and 0 "t rN. committee reports to find � � Ci�i�s - +f : latiti state legislative information ��w that has the most impact on cities and towns. =w ..». -- ® g ;IlTracker 4 , 1gdi ...Am, � as Awc COISMUg •• B I ' 1702 IWY611e0 dewy 00 kw, 11...[r1.•w.. el impact lee eel leetlo•1 1411. r• l• • a.. What matters most to cities _r,• „ "' 1Oth fI I . If / 1MefYntt••M* Mb., Track bills aligned directly with • • ' �•� u.�.- w..•..e.... .w MI P4 f. 1a AWC legislative priorities and . + see our position on each. SuaneryJ•tWC Canmerlc, . .I.y N A'. .f • r. Language that's .w easy to understand .11 We'll translate legislative • I . - _ yrt"' jargon into more familiar city - r ., language. CITIES r • ' Real time updates _ ■ Get the exact status of the bill as it moves i w through the legislative process. ;r- o 1 I,(1* , S J'1.1'••,liler . t.i r•1;∎•. . 4.1 l Iw. I I. .111.. 41e 1, In -depth insight and analysis ”' °t 1 Q 1 'fl , 1. "-- 7 'Ca , ; . Commentary from AWC lobbyists and analysts f it. %In ' "' • that helps you better understand the bill's true 0 "'t Y " ".''• .., ' g,..-31,4; '271 „ fvw �•rv... . 0 , l.lYl.iv� •.tll� • ,—,t� . . I.eww 6.1 . 1i1: y,w meaning and real impacts. ,. 1.... 0Z...h. .:.....•.l.i., 'I..n 1w,. MO. �� •11• µ Wn 41•I.ri• .1••l •. .. L. •.n l. J ll.• r in ! Join the conversation 1 " Y - ' ,.•t°°AI ""tl, 4 ll 0 UM 1 Vtu. 0'N b -r:vrt • gin Send your own insights, concerns, or questions '•✓'NVl1 <t l eu w. Y.•tl•r PI•to, In u,•• I,1 t• 1•r. •.< , ,•u1 nt- CV,•. .11, directly to our legislative team. AimlimmignomPft i Association ofWashington Cities • 1076 Franklin St SE • Olympia,WA 98501 • www.awcnet.org