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10/09/2012 02 Jail Issues C''' n f it :C 111 r 1116 ` , -. BUSINESS OF THE CITY COUNCIL YAKIMA, WASHINGTON AGENDA STATEMENT Item No. For Meeting of: October 9, 2012 ITEM TITLE: Discussion regarding Jail Issues. SUBMITTED BY: Tony O'Rourke, City Manager CONTACT PERSON/TELEPHONE: SUMMARY EXPLANATION: Presentation and discussion by Chief Rizzi and Captain Copeland (see attached information), and presentation and discussion by Yakima County Jail Operations Director Ed Campbell, Yakima County Financial Services Director Craig Warner, and Yakima County Court Administration Consultant Harold Delia (information to be provided at the meeting). Resolution Ordinance Other (specify) Contract: Mail to: Contract Term: Amount: Expiration Date: Insurance Required? No Funding Source: Phone: APPROVED FOR SUBMITTAL: &EL.._ City Manager STAFF RECOMMENDATION: BOARD /COMMISSION RECOMMENDATION: ATTACHMENTS: Click to download D summary Ei LCA report City of Yakima %= � 20 0 S. .3 Street Police Department Yakima, Washington 98901 ys� Dominic Rizzi, Chief of Police Telephone (509)575 -6200 Fax (509)575 -6007 nr To: City Manager Tony O'Rourke Chief Dominic Rizzi From: Captain Greg Copeland Date: October 2, 2012 RE: Summary of LCA Needs Assessment Report As you know, the City recently contracted with LCA architectural firm to provide the City of Yakima with information and analysis in support of our efforts to house the City's prisoners in the most efficient manner possible. The City Council requested to have the work done by LCA in a "phased" manner. The "Needs Assessment" report (attached) represents fulfillment of the first phase of the City's contract with LCA. Further work performed by LCA will take additional Council action. If the Council elects to move forward with LCA, the next step would involve preliminary design for facility expansion of the City's current jail. When that is completed and staffing levels for the expansion have been estimated, LCA will compare the costs of operating an expanded YPD facility to our existing contract with the County Jail and ultimately assist us in determining if we should expand our current jail or continue with the status quo. A few things to point out regarding the report: 1. We currently have a contract with the County Jail through the end of 2013. The contract calls for a flat rate (excluding medical costs, which are extra) of $2,200,000 per year for 110 beds. In the past, we would house inmates in lower valley jails (indicated on page 2 of the report). We no longer house inmates in the lower valley jails. 2. We pay housing costs only for misdemeanor and mixed misdemeanor /felony prisoners at the County Jail. We do not have to pay housing costs for felony prisoners; however, we do have to pay medical costs for the felony prisoners until they are convicted. 3. All of our female prisoners go to the County Jail, as we have no means to house them at the City Jail. 4. There is a marked disparity with regards to medical costs incurred at the City Jail vs. those much higher costs incurred at the County Jail. The most significant reason is this: The City is able to provide medical services by having a nurse (operating under orders from a Physician) visit the jail on a daily or almost daily basis. If an inmate has severe physical or mental issues, we normally send those inmates to the County as they are better prepared to deal with severe issues. The County utilizes a private contractor to provide medical services and incurs greater expense, at least in part due to the additional capabilities of the contractor. 5. There is also a marked difference in the average length of stay between the City jail and the County Jail. There are a couple of reasons for this. Many of our inmates have "mixed" misdemeanor and felony charges and we have to pay for the housing of these inmates. It typically takes much longer to resolve a felony case than it does a misdemeanor case, and the defense attorneys will usually want to obtain multiple resettings for the misdemeanor case as they hope to resolve all charges at once. Further (as noted above), we send prisoners with severe mental conditions to the County Jail. Often the Court will order these inmates to Eastern State Hospital for a psychiatric evaluation. There is usually a long wait for the evaluations and a prisoner can wait for months before they have an opportunity to go. 6. There is also a difference between the length of stay between the City Jail and the Toppenish and Sunnyside Jails. When we were using Lower Valley jails (through the end of 2011), we would send sentenced inmates to the Toppenish and Sunnyside Jails to complete their jail terms. Sentenced inmates have already been through the court process and do not usually have any more court appearances to make. By shifting these inmates to lower valley jails, we were able to keep City Jail beds available so that unsentenced inmates would be accessible to Municipal Court without long transports. The Wapato Jail was the least expensive of the lower valley jails and we used it to house a variety of inmates. It is also much closer to Yakima than the other jails, so transport issues were not as significant. NEEDS ASSESSMENT FOR Yakima City Detention Facility LCA ARCHITECTS LCA A_- " in association with stallalialalla ROCKY MOUNTAIN CORRECTIONS FINAL DRAFT September 17, 2012 PHASE 1 SERVICES LCA Architects and Rocky Mountain Corrections were contracted to conduct a feasibility study for a jail expansion of the Yakima City Detention Facility PRE - PLANNING WORKSHOP We conducted a project initiation meeting with key stakeholders to develop an under- standing of relevant issues, to gather information and to help us become more familiar with your current situation and your primary objectives and investigate city population growth projections through a number of different sources and collect past information on jail operations This will ensure that we get a full understanding of the kind of growth expected, and the demographics NEEDS ASSESSMENT We worked together with department heads and line staff (transition team) to develop criminal justice system scenarios using present and future average length of stays, present and future jail admissions, admission rates, peaking factors and classifications and build a forecasting model for the Jail that will give projected bed need estimates for the next twenty years We also did a cost analysis of housing your inmates in other jurisdictions compared to housing inmates in your facility This analysis has identified issues that will need special attention in the next phase of our study 1 JAIL COST ANALYSIS The historical inmate population statistics along with the cost analysis and budget impact to the City ofYakima show a significant increase that may not be sustainable in the future if it continues to grow at the same rate as it has the past 8 years The analysis shows that the City ofYakima Detention Facility runs a very efficient operation, but contracting inmates out to other jurisdictions is very costly From 2004 to 2011 the City misdemeanor jail population grew by 48 %, but the overall jail cost grew by 90% During this same time period, the Yakima City Jail budget grew by only 23% This shows that you can control your own cost if you have an adequate facility and lose that control when housing your inmates to outside facilities Year Yakima Wapato Toppenish Sunnyside Yakima City Total Jail County Jail Budget Expenditures 2004 $766,474 $65,826 $21,910 $12,250 $1,034,897 1,901,013 2005 $984,095 $23,851 $14,623 $0 � I $1,101,200 2,123,771 2006 $1,255,852 $31,488 $16,687 $15,26 I$2,489,280 2007 $1,535,896 $86,885 $41,281 $42,605 $1,231,05([ $2,937,718 2008 $1,541,813 $216,267 $59,497 $64,203 11,274,1821 1$3,155,964 2009 $1,950,819 $239,753 $139,321 $123,005 L1,350,247 ][ $3,803,147 2010 $1,367,006 $248,612 $59,044 ir6,788 ji ,323,897 3,OO5,349 2011 $2,035,581 $238,592 $72,788 11 $13,914 J � $1,277,551 D3,624,513 YAKIMA COUNTY /CITY COST ANALYSIS This next chart shows a side by side comparison of housing cost at the Yakima City Jail compared to the Yakima County Jail The statistics show that the cost is significantly higher to hold an inmate at the county jail compared to the city Breaking these costs down further shows it is the medical cost charged by the county that is driving up the cost per day This needs extensive study, because in the past five years it has cost the City an additional $1,000,000 in medical costs to house its prisoners in the County Detention Facility YAKIMA CITY Year Bookings City Misdemeanor Medical cost Total City Cost Jail Days 2007 3072 23,948 1.$72,761_ $1,231,077 2008 3340 24,773 A73, $1,274,182 2009 3283 25,644 AN$78,107 ii $1,350,521 2010 2964 23,487 .$79,299 AP $1,323,897 2011 2987 23,579 1111185,11M $1,277,551 YAKIMA COUNTY Bookings County Misdemeanor Medical cost r Total County Jail days Cost 2007 1786 23,410 $335,514 $1,535,896 2008 1562 22,601 $269,8741 $1,541,813 2009 1618 25,947 $348,916111 $1,950,819 2010 1087 15,780 $277,851 $1,367,006 2011 1114 19,083 $247,295 $2,035,581 AVERAGE LENGTH OF STAY The average length of stay (ALS) is another critical factor in determining the amount of beds that you may need in the future It is interesting that the Yakima city jail average length of stay is very consistent at 7 5 days per inmate, where the contract facilities are double that amount ranging from 9 to 17 average length of stay Analyzing the ALS differences show a few possible reasons Yakima City Detention Facility lacks proper classification beds, so they must send inmates that have more of a serious charge to the County Jail along with mental holds, both these types of inmates have a longer length of stay ■ Another factor could be that some inmates charged as felons may also have a misdemeanor charge as well, which will have a longer sentence Because of the wide range in length of stay, I have proposed three different Justice Models for your review 25 20 15 - - 11111.11-171.- -12010 ■ 2007 2008 2009 10 7 2011 5 0 Yakima City Yakima County \Napato Toppenish Sunnyside 4 INMATE BOOKINGS Yakima City followed a national trend during the years of 2004 to 2009 of incarceration growth before a slowdown in growth starting in 2010 Many areas have started to see that growth increase again in the final quarter of 2011 and continuing into 2012 So far in 2012, Yakima City has not experienced that growth and is continuing to stay in the line with 2011 numbers Once again, these numbers are taken into consideration in building our Justice Models for the future in Yakima 5,000 5,575 5,536 5,043 4,658 4,748 4,000 3,000 2,000 1,000 0 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 5 TOTAL INMATE DAYS This chart shows the amount of inmates charged with a misdemeanor and incarcerated by the City of Yakima By dividing these numbers by 365 days in a year you have your average daily population For the most part, you average 150 inmates a day but spiked to 174 inmates a day in 2009 The City detention facility will average between 23,000 to 25,000 inmate days a year So, for budgetary purposes, everything above 25,000 inmate days, the city will be charged a daily rate plus medical to the county As you look to the future with the Justice Models, you can predict what lies ahead for incarceration cost 70,000 60,000 63,690 50,000 52,828 55,444 54,932 ■ 46,534 40,000 ' 30,000 20,000 10,000 0 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 MISDEMEANOR ADMISSION RATE The Historical Admission Rates shows us what percentage of the city population gets ar- rested and charged with a misdemeanor only As you can see by the graph about 6% of the city population gets arrested on misdemeanor charges, which we will use in project- ing your future needs As your city population grows what incarceration rate you use to predict the future is critical in determining your future bed needs As you study this chart, you do not want to ignore the high admission rates of 2008 and 2009, but you do not want to base your future predictions on 2 very high years In the Justice Models submit- ted for review, I have used a low admission rate and medium admission rate with a 2% growth every 5 years to predict the future bed needs This somewhat conservative ap- proach keeps from overbuilding your detention facility 7 00% 1 6 00% 6.46% 6.24% ° 16.01% ■ 5 00 /0 ■ ■ ■5.11 %■5.16% 4 00% 3 00 2 00% 1 00/0 0 00% 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 7 MALE /FEMALE INMATE DAYS This chart breaks down the gender of inmates that come into your system Knowing the average length of stay, we can predict the amount of beds needed for the future which will assist the Architect in the next phase of the study in the preliminary design of the detention facility 5,000 4,500 4,256 4 460 3,972 4,000 3,660 3,725 3,500 3,000 2,500 2,000 1,500 1,319 1,071 1,076 998 1,023 1,000 500 i n 0 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Male Inmate Bookings Female Inmate Bookings JUSTICE MODELS Three Justice Models have been developed to assist in looking into the future of what lies ahead for the City ofYakima as far as Incarceration numbers Cost of housing Budget impact How many beds needed over the next 20 years if it is decided to expand the city detention facility The following Justice Models are for Misdemeanor charges only 9 JUSTICE MODEL ONE Based on Average Admission Rate for 2007 to 2011 Admission Rate Increase .002 Cap - 20% In Justice Model One, a conservative approach was taken with the admission rate of 58 %, average length of stay of 10, and a population growth of 1% a year until 2020 and a 2% growth a year until 2030 The CAP rate is classification and peaking factor, which means that you need at least 6 levels of classification, the most obvi- ous being male and female separation, high risk /low risk and medical beds Never is each classification full, so you may be at capacity at 85% The peaking factor is during certain times of the year your inmate population spikes, in agricultural counties it could be from the increase in the work force during the summer months This model shows a total of 55,512 prisoner days or an average of 152 a day by 2015 and growing to an average of 185 inmates a day by 2020 The past statistic shows that you have already been averaging 150 inmates a day since 2008, so this model would be no growth over the next three years For this model to work, the city would have to be in complete control over all of its inmates and implement strategies to insure an average length of stay of 10 days stay 2015 2020 Admission Rate 058 Admission Rate 060 Population 95,712 Population 100,900 Bookings 5,551 Bookings 6,054 ALS 10 ALS 10 Beds 152 Beds 166 CAP 30 CAP 33 Total Beds 182 Total Beds 199 Rental Beds 82 Rental Beds 96 Prisoner Days 55,512 Prisoner Days 67,392 2025 2030 Admission Rate 062 Admission Rate 064 Population 108,657 Population 117,096 Bookings 6,739 Bookings 7,494 ALS 10 ALS 10 Beds 185 Beds 205 CAP 37 CAP 41 Total Beds 222 Total Beds 246 Rental Beds 115 Rental Beds 135 10 Prisoner Days 67,392 Prisoner Days 74,941 JUSTICE MODEL TWO Based on Average Admission Rate for 2007 to 2011 Average Length of Stay of 11 Cap -20% Justice Model Two has the average admissions rate of 6% with an average length of stay of 11, which depicts your historical ALS over the past 5 years Under model 2, you can expect an average daily population of 173, which is Just below your 2009 level and growing to an average of 188 by 2020 Feedback from the Yakima City jail staff feel that this model best predicts the future for planning purposes 2015 2020 Admission Rate 060 Admission Rate 062 Population 95,7121 Population 100,900 Bookings • 43 Bookings 6,25 ALS 11 - I ALS 11 Beds 173 A Beds 188 CAP 35 CAP 38 Total Beds 208 Total Beds 226 . Rental Beds 103 II Rental Beds 118A Prisoner Days 63,173. Prisoner Days 68,814 2025 i ll 2030 Admission Rate 064 Admission Rate 066 Population 108,657 Population 117,096 Bookings 6,957 Bookings 7,728 i ll ALS 11 ALS 11 1 Beds 210 Beds 233A CAP 42 CAP 47 MI Total Beds 252 Total Beds 280 Rental Beds 140 Rental Beds 163 Prisoner Days 76,527 Prisoner Days 85,011 11 JUSTICE MODEL THREE Based on Historical ALS Data Yakima County Average Length of Stay of 14 Justice Model Three has the average admissions rate of 6 %, but uses the average length of stay of 14, which is what is currently occurring in the County Detention Facility This model can best be used to predict what lies ahead for budget purposes if everything stays as is since 2007 Model 3 shows 80,402 prisoner days by 2015 and growing to 87,581 by 2020 Knowing that your detention facility is full at 25,000 prisoner days, you can expect to pay for 50,000 plus prisoner days by 2015 As we study the cost analysis, the city paid over $2,000,000 for 19,000 prisoner days in 2011, and could be looking at twice that amount over the next 5 years 2015 2020 Admission Rate 060 Admission Rate 062 1 Population 95,712 Population 100,900 Bookings 5,743 Bookings 6,246 ALS 14 ALS 14 III Beds 220 Beds 240 J. CAP 44 CAP 48= Total Beds 264 1 Total Beds 288 Rental Beds 150 1 Rental Beds 170 Prisoner Days 80,402 Prisoner Days _ 87,581 2025 III 2030 Admission Rate 064 MI Admission Rate 066 Population 108,657' Population 117,096 Bookings 6,954 Bookings 7,728 mi l ALS �1111. ALS 14 Beds 267 1 Beds 296 CAP CAP 59 _MINIM Total Beds WI= Total Beds 355 Rental Beds Rental Beds 226 Prisoner Days 97,ign Prisoner Days 108,196 12 YAKIMA CITY FELONY INMATES This chart shows the amount of Felony inmates charged by the City that are being held by the County There is also a category named mixed, which are City inmates that are charged with a felony, but also have a misdemeanor charge attached as well Because of the misdemeanor charge, the County is charging the city a daily rate for these inmates We recommend that this category of inmate needs additional study to determine who is actually responsible for the housing cost and what policies can be put into place to reduce these costs to the city Year Felons Mixed Felons & Total Inmates Held Misdemeanors 2007 119 a day 42 a day 161 a day 2008 121 a day 37 a day 158 a day 2009 107 a day 36 a day 143 a day 2010 149 a day 21 a day 170 a day 2011 164 a day 31 a day 195 a day 13 TOTAL MISDEMEANORS HELD BY JURISDICTION We broke down by each year the amount of misdemeanors being held in the different jurisdictions for the city The first total category shows the average daily population for inmates charged with a misdemeanor only The mixed category shows the amount of inmates held daily that are charged with a felony and misdemeanor Since the county is charging the city for this category of inmate, they should be included in the total bed count for planning purposes of a new jail Year City Jail County Jail Other Jails Total Mixed Mixed Total 2007 66 64 12 142 42 _MEd 2008 68 1 -_ I 23 15 2009 [ 31 172 36 2081 2010 64 1 [ 18 125 21 146 7 2011 69 j -_ [ 17 138 31 169 14 HOW DOES YAKIMA COMPARE WITH NATIONAL INCARCERATION RATES? The 2011 statistics show nationally, jails incarcerated 236 inmates per 100,000 population Nationally 61% of inmates were not convicted, but in jail awaiting court action and 39% of inmates were sentenced offenders In 2011,Yakima City had 364 inmates incarcerated with a population of 91,930 which is over 54% higher than the national average The 364 inmates included felons, mixed, which is inmates charged with a felony and misdemeanor and misdemeanor only charges In the State of Washington the crime rate for 2010 was 25% higher than the national average Property crimes accounted for 92% of the crime rate which is about 30% higher than the national average National Yakima City 236 !► 364 per 100,000 per 91,930 Yakima City: 54 A higher than the national average 15 SUMMARY & RECOMMENDATIONS We added a cost analysis of housing your inmates in other jail facilities in phase 1 of this study to better understand the entire correctional needs for the city This analysis brought forward the need for immediate attention to the cost being charged to the city for medical services for its inmates As outlined in the cost analysis chart the city has paid an extra million dollars in medical cost to the county over the past 5 years and can expect that figure to climb with the inmate population projections It is our recommendation that we add to the second phase of the study a complete analysis of the medical services provided by the county, identify strategies to lower medical cost and put together a team to negotiate a contract for services At the same time, we recommend that the city adopt Justice Model 2 and move forward with programming layout and preliminary design for the facility expansion by providing graphic block "space diagrams" indicating various options for expansion Develop options as to the best approach to adding on to your existing facility and prepare an opinion of probably construction cost, including site development and associated soft cost, producing a total project budget An operational analysis needs to be completed for the expanded facility This will entail developing a staffing plan, operational cost estimates along with an operational pro -forma This pro -forma can be compared to your existing housing contract with the county to provide a direct comparison to outsourcing your inmates compared to housing your own inmates FINAL DOCUMENT PLAN At the conclusion of the study, we will also provide an analysis of options for capital fund- ing sources for the project We will present the summary report to the designated representatives of the Client clearly outlining "what to do next "and answering questions that may arise We will then provide copies of the final report for your use 16 Distributed at the he Meeting I C7' Department of Corrections _.. _____----.,_ 4 - ' Felonies by Agency Agency Inmates % WA Dept of Fish and Wildlife (DFW) 2 0.6 Grandview (GVP) 14 3.9 LEAD (LEAD) 4 1.1 Mabton (MAB) 1 0.3 Moxee (MOX) 3 0.8 Out of County (OOC) 7 1.9 Selah (SEL) 6 1.7 Sunnyside (SSD) 26 7.2 Toppenish (TOP) 10 2.8 Union Gap (UGP) 10 2.8 Wapato (WPP) 10 2.8 WA State Patrol (WSP) 12 3.3 Yakima Co Juvenile (YCJV) 4 1.1 Yakima Co Prosecutor (YCPA) 2 0.6 Yakima Co Sheriff (YCSO) 71 19.6 Yakima (YPD) 180 49.6 Zillah (ZPD) 1 0.3 363 100.0 I ..ormTv.w , -.. z . -.1...,-..,%,-*'.4t, "' '-,1;!",'",V ';'',-C,T-34t-4;',.:ViP:k4r1.,k4,'.-74'',Z,Niakt,110 ' ' ,-,, ,,,';:knigi-YeY.'i,n0;bt.L4610,„A.Ls ti '..'-,.;;,..,-,:4, 'ikekk ; ' , 1';CV.4;0$01 . trg . \ , , ,,,4 , 4 -!: ''''', ..!..1,..kow,:oviie.,..,•444,,eig.ittowAktg vi' : ' -t.i•,..-i lw ,7.4 . , • 0„, .twit•?. , .I.,,i,f,hip M - i:,,, • - ' .'''''',,' tPfl.4iltittiVIWW401.1U% s -4114.. . .,'''',4,,., , :k.'"41'-i''''.4 , . 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F a ",F • f ' t 4u A -ii{t- i k „,. �'# 0,i.- �t is s?, ) f CD � t Sl is v. 4 Ry gig ® • ^ E`u =`,� u't, 4%'',d�$ �, " >n,"'� . a Cil iR - CD n sx tgr €w 4 fa "z'' i � .s � ' n ` l a tr , i ,} . a € �' 'Ua fr"R �} " :,,,4,,&.,,k .ra+ {.�,a� qT, �+'ft ':' i L 4 X vy C I R , , i o k " /, C1J .,...,,„--1,.,,,p 1.:.r.iiiii,..i, i Attk CU r n t , i � L 3'.v 4 �' +4a7 _I S W x 4,g F , 4 11 3, G � I ,4F a k � x , y. „ / " d m x r a � { r, „ F� n 7 , a sh s 3� 7 9i' +a a) i ds d i 'tc r o-nm; a 1 F15,� s r tr t i .' c) ? a t � y d r �q 'd � e �,Wa , 4 ;: r fee) Distributed at We Meeting (0 • 'ill/ 2010 2013 Actual Projected Category Amount I Beds Amount I Beds Rate Bed Rentals: Federal $2,990,260 108.22 $1,696,538 55.00 $84.51 City of Yakima $1,087,993 35.74 $2,200,000 110.00 $54.79 Yakima County Cities $567,679 20.34 $251,485 10.60 $65.00 State DOC $4,746,424 157.47 $1,085,875 35.00 $85.00 Other Agencies $10,905,607 291.92 $0 0.00 Total Bed Rentals $20,297,963 613.69 $5,233,898 210.60 Yakima County General Fund $11,181,685 442.04 $13,376,022 447.00 $81.98 County Road $0 $2,878,200 Total Yakima County $11,181,685 442.04 $16,254,222 447.00 Grants $172,234 $75,000 Sales of Merchandise $346,312 $150,000 Housing /Monitoring of Prisoners $512,947 $400,000 Juvenile Meals $0 $140,000 Investment Interest $23,889 $0 Miscellaneous Revenue $192,743 $77,000 Other Miscellaneous Revenue: Inmate Telephone $503,629 $250,000 Medical Reimburse $1,300,259 $350,000 Total Other Miscellaneous Revenue $1,803,888 $600,000 Total Revenue $34,531,661 $22,930,120 10/9/2012 Page 1 Department of Corrections Expense 2010 2013 Actual Projected Category Amount Amount Salaries FTE - 251 $11,694,259 FTE - 154 $8,309,896 Benefits $5,165,457 $3,809,914 Supplies $1,256,007 $690,900 RX $567,598 $233,700 Operating Supplies $560,761 $348,250 Printing $62,453 $18,000 Other $65,195 $90,950 Other Services $11,035,946 $7,174,672 Medical $3,641,022 $1,925,845 Mental Health $459,898 $93,000 Food Service $1,940,181 $1,576,000 Indirect Cost $974,934 $686,401 Purchasing Service $33,321 $41,210 Technology Service $603,055 $552,139 GIS $0 $1,124 Facilities Service $2,217,844 $1,699,074 Liability Insurance $360,795 $149,678 Professional Services $242,674 $257,800 Communications $61,464 $49,441 Operating Rentals $298,717 $100,700 Capital Projects $110,026 $0 Other $92,015 $42,260 Debt $2,381,208 $2,692,833 RC $328,196 $273,570 YCCC $ 2,053,012 $1,913,625 Remodel $0 $505,638 Total Expense $31,532,877 $22,678,215 Beginning Balance $1,254,071 $58,312 Revenue $34,531,661 $22,930,120 Expense $31,532,877 $22,678,215 Ending Balance $4,252,855 $310,217 10/9/2012 Page 2 2013 Yakima County 2013 City of Yakima Projected Projected Category Amount Amount Rate Salaries FTE - 154 $8,309,896 FTE - 16 $857,000 Benefits $3,809,914 $411,893 Supplies $690,900 $34,521 RX $233,700 $5,250 Operating Supplies $348,250 $28,271 Printing $18,000 $1,000 Other $90,950 Other Services $7,174,672 $267,779 Medical $1,925,845 $69,750 Mental Health $93,000 ? Food Service $1,576,000 $138,029 Indirect Cost $686,401 ? Purchasing Service $41,210 ? Technology Service $552,139 ? GIS $1,124 ? Facilities Service $1,699,074 ? Liability Insurance $149,678 ? Professional Services $257,800 $60,000 Communications $49,441 ? Operating Rentals $100,700 ? Other $42,260 ? Debt $2,692,833 ? $0 Total Expense $22,678,215 $1,571,193 $57.40 10/9/2012 Page 3 Distributed at the Meeting /D °9 - /a— Price, Cally From: Copeland, Greg Sent: Tuesday, October 09, 2012 8 58 AM To: Rizzi, Dominic; O'Rourke, Tony Cc: Price, Cally Subject: LCA Costs Thus far we have paid LCA $15,000 for "Phase 1" of the study (Pre - Planning and Needs Assessment) "Phase 2" is another $35,000, broken down as follows Programming $10,000 Concept Design $10,000 Operational Analysis $10,000 Final Document Plan $5,000 1