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07/17/2012 13A Council General Information • ‘,,-'.„- -, ,7f, 4. --,, , ft i-,:f.„: 1 BUSINESS OF THE CITY COUNCIL YAKIMA, WASHINGTON AGENDA STATEMENT ,. Item No. i --s P For Meeting of: July 17, 2012 ITEM TITLE: Council General Information SUBMITTED BY: CONTACT PERSON /TELEPHONE: SUMMARY EXPLANATION: 1. 7/12/12 Weekly Issues Report 2. Community Review Board Agenda for 7/18/12 3. City Meeting Schedule for week of July 16 through 23, 2012 • 4. Preliminary Future Activities Calendar as of July 16, 2012 5. Preliminary Council Agenda 6. Newspaper /Magazine /Internet Articles: * "1 -502: Marijuana Initiative," awcnet.org, May 2012 * "Mayor Cuts Workers' Pay to Minimum Wage," WSJ.com, July 9, 2012 Resolution Ordinance Other (specify) Contract: Mail to: Contract Term: Amount: Expiration Date: Insurance Required? No Funding Source: Phone: APPROVED FOR City Manager SUBMITTAL: STAFF RECOMMENDATION: BOARD /COMMISSION RECOMMENDATION: ATTACHMENTS: 111 Click to download ❑ info packet MEMORANDUM July 12, 2012 TO: The Honorable Mayor and City Council Members FROM: Tony O'Rourke, City Manager SUBJECT: Weekly Issues Report • CITY COUNCIL MEETING NEXT WEEK: The City Council meeting next Tuesday, July 17, will begin at 6:00 p.m. There will not be an Executive Session prior to the Council meeting. • REGIONAL FIRE AUTHORITY: This Committee (Cawley, Adkison, and Coffey) will be meeting on Wednesday, July 18 at 6:00 p.m. at Fire Station 95. • NEW EMAIL SERVICE: Information Technology Services installed the new email server. A couple months ago the City acquired the yakimawa.gov domain. The website is operational but now the new email format can be used ( Firstname .lastname(c�yakimawa.gov). For example. tony.orourke(a�yakimawa.gov. Your old email address will continue to work as well. If you notice any problems with either email address please let us know as soon as possible. • WATER DIVISION UPDATE: The Water and Irrigation Division has started the annual fire hydrant painting. The goal is to paint 600 to 700 hydrants this year. • OUT OF OFFICE: I will be out of the office the afternoon of Wednesday, July 18 to pick up my daughter from SeaTac Airport. If you need to get in contact with me please call my cell phone or Cally. She will be in contact with me throughout the afternoon. COMMUNITY REVIEW BOARD MEETING AGENDA July 18, 2012 5:30 p.m. - Council Chambers - City Hall I. CALL TO ORDER II. ROLL CALL C.R.B. Members Staff Gregory Bohn Joe Caruso Ben Shoval Bob Mason Judy Pozarich Phyllis Musgrove Mei -Lynne Statler Richard Marcley III. APPROVAL OF MINUTES A. Approval of the minutes from the June 20, 2012 meeting IV. HEARINGS — CODE COMPLIANCE CASES A. None V. HEARINGS — RIGHT -OF -WAY USE PERMITS (FENCE) A. None VI. CODE ADMINISTRATION MANAGER'S STATUS REPORT A. Code Compliance Statistics for the month of June, 2012 VII. NEW BUSINESS A. None VIII. OLD BUSINESS A. None IX. , ADJOURNMENT CITY MEETING SCHEDULE For July 16, 2012 — July 23, 2012 Please note: Meetings are subject to change Monday, July 16 10:00 a.m. City Council Media Briefing — Council Chambers 3:00 p.m. Bid Opening — Council Chambers Tuesday, July 17 10:00 a.m. County Commissioners Agenda Meeting — Council Chambers 6:00 p.m. City Council Meeting — Council Chambers Wednesday, July 18 12:00 p.m. PAL Board Meeting — PAL Center 3:30 p.m. Arts Commission Meeting — CED Conference Room 5:30 p.m. Community Review Board — Council Chambers 6:00 p.m. Regional Fire Authority Meeting — Station 95 Thursday, July 19 9:00 a.m. County Hearing Examiner — Council Chambers 10:00 a.m. SIED Board Meeting — New Vision 11:30 a.m. Sports Commission Meeting — Yakima County Stadium Monday, July 23 12:00 p.m. Greenway Board Meeting — Greenway Visitors Center Office Of Mayor /City Council Preliminary Future Activities Calendar Please Note: Meetings are subject to change • _ - , �. -... , w. "� °cc ° >'. w r �. - Fe:r � _ �; y . ... ^ r; �kac•�; , °Or aiiz�ation'. �� v :�= :iUleetii�� ;iir ; ,,. se:�,�' . . < ,F?aitici °arits�:;• � ; =�: .:,. .9 ,, ,.:�.. 9' .WQ � � NfeetirigE''Lncation'_: z� , »'4 1 wF. D: ". •. '�i 5 •t. :: 4:sw,i . N4, ..b ,arise. i,r adJ.°, R;,. ,� N V `. rN.., .� ; ""`:' ja +d 3 :, rot7n: � �F + ? . .: ytl ti� p .. '!:i � ' * c �'. n. ,✓' t;C ;. �„� YC ..�V•;r r • ., :•F. { ",e t�'' f•:µ:" y M1'�rM1 .a ., .e •S. .,+E&•;gi , •.K 4 6 ' 1 .3. X C. Mon. July 16 10:00 a.m City Council Media Briefing Scheduled Meeting Bristol Council Chambers Tue. July 17 12:00 p.m. Miscellaneous Issues Scheduled Meeting Cawley, Adkison, TBD Lover 6 • m Cit Council Meetin• Scheduled Meetin• Council Council Chambers Wed. July 18 12:00 p.m. PAL Board Meeting Board Meeting Coffey PAL Center 3 p.m. Arts Commission Scheduled Meeting Adkison CED Conference Room 6:00 p.m. Regional Fire Authority Scheduled Meeting Cawley, Adkison, Station 95 Coffe Thur. July 19 10.00 a.m SIED Board Meeting Board Meeting Coffey New Vision Office 11:30 a.m. Yakima Sports Commission Scheduled Meeting Ettl Yakima County Stadium Meetin• Fri. July 20 6:00 p m Welcome Beta Sigmi Phi Scheduled Meeting Cawley Convention Center Convention 12 •.m. Greenwa Board Meetin• Board Meetin• Ettl Greenwa Visitors Center Tue. July 24 10:00 a m. Council Study Session - Scheduled Meeting Council Council Chambers Metropolitan Parks District 12.00 p m Miscellaneous Issues Scheduled Meeting Cawley, Adkison, TBD Bristol Wed. July 25 12:00 p.m. Yakima Valley Visitors & Board Meeting Adkison Red Lion Convention Bureau Board Meeting 5:30 p.m Historic Preservation Scheduled Meeting Bristol Council Chambers Commission Thur. July 26 7 a.m Airport Board Meeting Board Meeting Adkison Airport Conference Room 10.00 a.m. Yakima Regional Public Scheduled Meeting Bristol Convention Center Facilities District 1 30 p.m. Yakima County EMS & Scheduled Meeting Lover Toppenish Community Trauma Meetin• Hos•ital Sun. July 29 m. Yakima Training Center Scheduled Event - Yakima Training Center Dedication Ceremon Tue. July 31 12:00 p m. Miscellaneous Issues Scheduled Meeting Cawley, Adkison, TBD Coffe Thur. Aug. 2 9:00 a.m. Joint Admin & 911 Scheduled Meeting Lover Toppenish Fire Station 9 Operations Meeting 6:00 p.m. Yakima Regional Fire Scheduled Meeting Cawley, Coffey, TBD Authority Adkison Fri. Aug. 3 _12o a m. Sister Cit Meetin Scheduled Meeting Adkison CED Conference Room WaSASCZ PRELIMINARY FUTURE COUNCIL AGENDA July 24 10:00 a.m. City Council Study Session — Council Chambers • Metropolitan Park Districts August 7 1:00 p.m. (T) Executive Session — Council Chambers 2:00 p.m. Business Meeting — Council Chambers • Presentation of the DYBID Quarterly report • Consideration of professional services engineering agreement for North First Street improvement project • Resolution authorizing the City manager to execute a contract with Kennedy Jenks, Consultant Engineers, for design of a new grease receiving station at the City's Wastewater Treatment Plan (Schafter) • Resolution authorizing a sole source procurement between the City of Yakima and Enaqua for the purchase of ultraviolet (UV) replacement lamps designed for the Wastewater Division's Enaqua UV disinfection system. (Schafer) 7/11/2012 4.22 PM 1 Ml ay ASso °ciATION' 1- 502 : O FP WASHIN C "I Marijuana - Initiative In November, Washington State voters will decide the fate Cities and counties must be notified of any applicants of Initiative 502, which legalizies marijuana use. in their jurisdiction and may object under a process similar to liquor license objections. No licenses would What would the initiative do? be approved for locations within 1,000 feet of schools, If approved, the initiative legalizes marijuana use, with playgrounds, recreation centers, day cares, parks, transit limits, for people over 21. Private stores, producers, centers, libraries, and arcades. and processors would be licensed to sell marijuana. The Washington State Liquor Control Board (LCB) would Would the initiative impose taxes on regulate and tax marijuana. marijuana? Yes. At each transaction point (producer to processor, Who could sell marijuana? processor to retailer, and retailer to consumer) a 25% The initiative provides for licensed retail locations. excise tax would be levied. Local and state sales tax Marijuana stores could only sell marijuana, marijuana would also be levied on retail sales. infused products, and paraphernalia. The excise taxes would be placed in a dedicated marijuana Stores would be allowed to sell an individual one ounce fund and would primarily be distributed to the state's seable marijuana, 16 ounces of marijuana- infused Basic Health Plan, the state general fund, health - related act in solid form, or 72 ounces of marijuana- infused programs, and the LCB for administrative costs. Local p, oduct in liquid form. Stores may not allow on- premise governments would not get a share of the excise tax. consumption. Does the initiative address medical Stores would be prohibited from advertising or showing product that was visible from outside the store. marijuana? The initiative is silent on medical marijuana. However, Nobody under age 21 could enter marijuana stores, and 1 -502 would impact medical users as marijuana could be store owners and employees also must be over 21. purchased at retail stores, and state and local criminal penalties for possession and use are eliminated. Would there be rules for users? And what about federal law? Yes. In addition to being over 21, marijuana could not be opened or consumed in public. It would also establish a The initiative does not change federal law, and the presumptive standard for driving under the influence of federal government could continue to arrest marijuana marijuana - similar to standards for alcohol - but only producers, processors, retailers, and users. available as a blood test. AWC :contact ;Akg.i 'w ` Zt n How would marijuana be regulated? �xNti T The LCB would regulate and license marijuana producers, Candice Bock candtcebGawcnet org Le islative, Policy,Advocate processors, and retailers. The LCB would establish the���,� -� maximum number of retailers per county the maximum - Serena Dolly s�nadCawcnne r , � . amount of marijuana a retailer and producer could iLegt slattve &t Policy have on premises, how Et when marijuana could be N-0,4.x.i y'¢ transported, and product labeling requirements. The LCB could also establish rules about security requirements, AWC has not taken a position for or against this ballot initiative. AWC's role is to provide its members with educational materials that can be 'oyee training a supervision, and locations Et hours of shared with elected officials, staff and the community. In addition, l operations. please review the PDC's guidelines for elected and appointed officials' participation in ballot proposition activity. r Association of Washington Cities • 1076 Franklin St SE, Olympia, WA 98501 • awcnet.org /10/12 Mayor Cuts Workers' Pay to Minimum Wage - WSJ.com I Are you comfortable in your retirement? t ' , . If you have a $500,000 portfolio, download the guide for retirees by Forbes columnist 4 and money manager Ken Fisher's firm Ifs called 'The 15- Minute Retirement PEan." a i `` 'Iii iaJtiili. iivw ac ilOi Y kt; *4 FISHER INVESTMENTS"' ' TITS"' ��. L, n i r r` � M �1' mf �.sN4'1 P 'yl' � 3 K rFa .� ✓n` wv v. kL rhlr4 sY LN.� Dow Jones Reprints: This copy is for your personal, non - commercial use only To order presentation -ready copies for distribution to your colleagues, clients or customers, use the Order Reprints tool at the bottom of any article or visit www.djreprints.com TI LE See a a reprint in PDF format. Order a reprint of this article now r 1 ILE �9A'LL STREET ARM. WS.I.corn ECONOMY I July 9, 2012, 7:21 p.m ET Mayor Cuts Workers' Pay to Minimum Wage By KR IS MAH ER Unions representing city workers in Scranton, Pa., plan to ask a county judge to hold the mayor in contempt of court after he cut the pay of almost 400 municipal employees — including himself —to the state's minimum wage, saying the city can't pay the full salaries. ,,...4:4,„., i � t` ? ^ ' '` Mayor Chris Doherty, a Democrat, temporarily cut the wages ,, p 4 of police, firefighters and others to $'7.25 an hour Friday, • ` 1 ' r4i ,-,r,,4 ',,`,',,,:;.'1•: `' hours after a judge issued an injunction requested by three � � %,,k,,,, { ;q' unions that represent most of the workers. A lawsuit filed July - ' , .. , __ : , �,1 t'L F 2 in Lackawanna County Court on behalf of the unions argued 4 f , ' rkn P that cutting the salaries unilaterally would violate the workers' 7 . y' '' contracts under state laws governing public employees as well , e ,�,�) as federal law. I I Meanwhile, Scranton's business administrator said the city had The Scranton TimesTrinune /Associated Press just $5,000 in the bank last week after transferring enough Scranton City Council members Frank Joyce, left, and Jack Loscorrbe at a July 5 hearing on the city's money to cover the city's payroll at $7.25 an hour, the state's — finances. and the nation's— minimum wage. Mayor Doherty has said that once the immediate crisis is over, workers will be paid their deferred pay. Mr. Doherty didn't respond to requests for comment Monday. The city's solicitor and business administrator also didn't return phone calls seeking comment. Thomas Jennings, a Philadelphia attorney representing the unions, said Monday he planned to file a motion Tuesday with the Lackawanna County Court asking the court to hold the mayor and city in contempt. Mr. Jennings said he also is preparing to file a lawsuit against the city in federal court, arguing that the city has violated the federal Fair Labor Standards Act by not paying full wages or overtime. The labor dispute is the latest turn in Scranton's protracted fiscal crisis. Like other municipalities, the blue - collar city of 75,000 in northeastern Pennsylvania has been hit by a shrinking tax base and rising costs for city workers' pay and benefits. In recent years, Scranton gained notoriety as the home of the fictional paper company in the TV show "The Office." Scranton is one of about 20 cities across Pennsylvania operating under a state law for fiscally distressed municipalities, known as Act 47. Others include Harrisburg, the state capital, and Pittsburgh. � The city's unions say they are caught in a political fight between the mayor and the city council over how to /10/12 Mayor Cuts Workers' Pay to Minimum Wage - WSJ.com cover a $16.8 million gap in the city's 2012 budget. Mr. Doherty proposed a 78% property -tax increase over three years, and an increase in garbage- collection fees. The city council rejected that plan and wanted the mayor to consider other revenue sources. Robert McGoff Jr., a city council member who has been supportive of the mayor, said the council has yet to offer any firm alternatives to the mayor's budget proposals. He said he would support trying to institute a 1% county -wide sales -tax increase, which would need state approval. Mr. McGoff said he thought cutting workers' pay was a "desperate measure" that was made to have funds to help maintain health and other benefits. "In the absence of any other solution, this seemed to be the best alternative," he said. Most city council members opposed the wage cut, said Pat Rogan, another council member. "Obviously it's a violation of all the [labor] contracts that the city has," he said. Mr. Rogan said he supports privatizing the city's garbage collection and sewer authority to raise revenue. Sam Vitris, 51, a city employee for 32 years, is a truck driver with the Scranton Department of Public Works. He had his pay cut 62% to $7.25 from $19.39 an hour. "Basically we're caught in the middle of it all," said Mr. Vitris, who is president of Local Lodge 2305 of the International Association of Machinists, which represents maintenance and other non - uniform workers. "We're hoping that this gets resolved quickly so people don't start losing their homes and get their credit ruined," he said. Others, however, trace some of Scranton's woes to a state law that says cities must follow contract terms set by an arbitrator regardless of the city's financial situation. The state Supreme Court ruled in the fall that Scranton had to pay $30 million in additional labor costs granted through arbitration. Negotiations between the city and the three unions in June cut that increase roughly $15 million. Rick Schuettler, deputy executive director of the Pennsylvania League of Cities, said he believes the state needs to cap the amount of labor cost increases granted through arbitration. "We're not suggesting that anybody's collective bargaining rights be taken away," he said, "but they need to have reasonable caps on them." Write to Kris Maher and kris.maher n wsj.com Copyright 2012 Dow Jones & Company, Inc. All Rights Reserved This copy is for your personal, non - commercial use only Distribution and use of this material are governed by our Subscriber Agreement and by copyright law. For non - personal use or to order multiple copies, please contact Dow Jones Reprints at 1- 800 -843 -0008 or visit w w w .djreprints,com