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03/27/2012 00 Strategic Priorities - Distributed at the Meeting "4y o f Yakima City Council Strategic Priorities Adopted March 2008 • Maintain and Improve Public Health and Safety • Efficiently Manage Public Resources and Ensure Fiscal Stability • Promote Economic Development and Diversification • Preserve and Enhance Yakima's Quality of Life • Provide Responsive Customer Service and Effective Communications CD 5 Cr • Build and Utilize Strategic Partnerships City of Yakima Administration Department + Human Resources •:• Wastewater + Water — Irrigation •:• Community Relations + Information Systems ❖ City Clerk's Office •o Purchasing Executive Staff — City Manager and Executive Secretary • Provide administrative support to Council and other departments • Budget development • Personnel issues • Collective Bargaining H uman Resources — 8 employees • Employment and Recruitment • Recruiting /advertising /screening applications • Interview process development and administration • Compensation /Classification • Wage /salary administration ■ Job descriptions, analyses, evaluations • Workers' Compensation and Safety Administration • Retirement System Benefits Administration • Maintain Personnel Records • Health Benefits Administration - Approximately $11 million annually • Collective Bargaining • Civil Service W astewater • Maintain and operate regional wastewater treatment facility serving Yakima, Union Gap, West Valley, Terrace Heights, and Moxee • Serve a population of nearly 120,000 with 335 miles of sanitary sewer pipe • Provide collection and treatment of sanitary wastewater and process wastewater • Protect the environment • Protect public heath and welfare • Assess and comply with regulatory agency requirements • Partner of the Regional Stormwater Policy Group with Yakima County, Union Gap and Sunnyside Water - Irrigation • Provide drinking water to 65,000 customers — 11,000 customers with irrigation water • 25 million gallons per day go through the Water Treatment Plant • Backup wells at Kissel, Kiwanis, and Gardner parks and Yakima Air Terminal • Implementing an automated meter reading program • Refurbishing the recycle lagoons at the Water Treatment Plan • Completed the refurbishment of the high priority project in the irrigation system C ommunity Re l employees • Core functions • YCTV — provide training and use of tv production equipment • Y -PAC — provides coverage of local government and public affairs events • Community Relations — serves as primary media liaison and spokesperson and provides communications assistance to City departments and divisions • Franchise Mgmt — provides oversight and administration of 10 telecom franchises and 1 cable franchise • Funding • No general fund tax dollars are used to support the division's services • Supported by dedicated revenue from cable franchise fees and a facilities and equipment grant by Charter Communications Information Systems • Division manager position merged with Public Safety Director in 2011 as budget reduction policy issue • Maintain all city computer systems and telecommunication systems • Respond to internal work order requests (65% are for public safety) • Provide oversight for 9 -1 -1 Communication Center • Public Safety Communication infrastructure nearing end of life — needs significant upgrading City Cl erk's Office — 3 employees • General duties • Maintain official city records • Prepare Council packets and various documents • Maintain Board and Commission applications • Respond to public disclosure requests • Administer oaths of office • Records Management • Digital archiving and accessibility of records on website • Budget - $476,422 • Legislation $149,526 • Records $326,896 C ity/County • Centralized purchasing for City /County at $7,500/$5,000 • Comply with statutes, laws, regulations, prevailing wage and insurance requirements • Limited public works projects for City at $35,000 and below • Implementation of Cayenta and E- Procurement • Affect over $40 million for City /County with over 100 City /County projects on To -Do List • Surplus — over 2,085 units and $326,010 in proceeds in 2011 for City /County Financial Services Department Budget FTEs Financial Services Division $1.4 M 14.0 Utility Customer Services Division $1.3 M 13.75 Core Responsibilities & Functions to Achieve Council Priorities Efficiently Manage Public Resources and Ensure Fiscal Stability ✓ Provide Responsive Customer Service & Effective Communications Accounting (Accts. Payable; Payroll; Revenue / Expenditure reporting, etc.) > Timely & Accurate Payment of Bills • Over 14,000 Checks processed annually • Over 2,000 vendors paid annually • 2,500 — 3,000 invoices processed monthly • Over 30 dept /divisions supported by 2 FTEs > Accounts Receivable Processing (Billing / Invoicing) & Delinquent Account Follow -up • Processed approx. 3,200 invoices totaling $4,941,908 receivables by 1 FTE (Ex: DYBID, Public Safety Services, Fire dispatch services, Gambling taxes, etc.) > Grant Accounting: Compliance, Reimbursements, Reporting • Financial management for approx. 50 grants — Over $22 million ➢ Cash / Banking Transactions: handling / reconciliation • $360,000 average daily deposit • Total revenue from external sources $135 million — includes utility, satellites Accounting (cont.) (Accts. Payable; Payroll; Revenue / Expenditure reporting, etc.) Maintain General Ledger: ensure proper record keeping for all funds and transactions • Approx. 75 funds; Over 500 revenue accounts & 3,300 expenditure accounts >Administer Payroll and all related tax, retirement records • 790 Average monthly paid employees / 10, 128 Annual Payroll Warrants issued — 1.5 FTEs >Comply with numerous regulatory bodies (GAAP, GASB, IRS ...) • Training & Continued Education requires a minimum 40 hrs annually to maintain CPA status — 4 CPA's Internal Controls / Internal Auditing > Financial Policies & Procedures: Establish, Monitor, Update > Internal Control Procedure: Establish, Monitor, Update > Risk assessments — review processes, practices, insurance coverages, etc. > Assist all Divisions re: internal control risks / procedures > Assist federal, state and other regulatory auditors (Audits of Financial Statements; Benefits; Ins.; etc.) • Follow -up on Audit recommendations Financial Reporting > Produce the Annual Financial Report (CAFR) > Quarterly reports to Council > Prepare / Submit Numerous Regulatory Reports Treasury & Financial Analysis ➢ Debt Issuance & Administration & Disclosure Requirements • Bonds, Bank Loans, Lease Agreements, Line of Credit, HUD Loans ➢ Cash & Investment Portfolio Management • Maximize earnings while maintaining sufficient liquidity and security of principal ➢ Research internal / external financial, legislative, purchasing, (etc., etc.) proposals ➢ Monitor & Analyze City's revenues, expenditures, financial programs, etc. and recommend efficiency / effectiveness and /or cost saving improvements c Budgeting ➢ Forecast Revenues & Expenditures L ➢ Annual Operating & Operating Budgets: develop, maintain, monitor & adjust as needed Challenges for 2012 ➢ Transitional issues — Both Citywide and in Finance • New City Manager • New Police Chief • Allocation of additional duties to Finance staff ➢ Refund a Revenue Bond issue for significant savings ➢ Cayenta Software implementation — 2 finance staff on "core" team ➢ Direct deposit implementation ➢ Implement GASB pronouncements — (fund balance classification) ➢ New Banking Industry Regulations Utility Customer Service > Business Office Support Services - • Water Utility • Wastewater Utility • Refuse Utility • Irrigation Utility • Stormwater • Dog License • Bus Passes • City Clerk (limited hours) > Prepare, maintain and distribute timely & accurate billings / records • Process 186,000 billings annually • Service 91,000 customers • Answer 110,000 calls annually > Provide Excellent Customer Service Challenges for 2012 ➢ Meter Reading & Field Services • Field specialist moved to Water dept. • Discontinue accepting payments in the field • Improve field notices for customers ➢ Study & revise cost saving mailing options • Streamlining customer account notices • Outsourcing printing /stuffing /mailing Utility bills ➢ Improve Customer Service • Improve internal communications, accountability & ownership • Cross training of Customer Service Representative's duties • Additional AWWA Customer Service Training (American Water Works Association) City of Yakima 11 404 iklettl ot , pk:kt , i I( 0 ) ((ri d , 1 Jeff Cutter, City Attorney Prosecution Division __ Civil Division Patricia Martinez, Office Manager Bev Bush, Front Desk/Legal Assistant Breadth of Issues Facing Legal Department City Liability Construction Law Contracts Corrections Law Public Disclosure Use of Public Rights -of -Way Land Use Litigation Federal Grant Programs Real Estate Transactions Railroad Rights -of -Way Employment Law Franchises Health & Safety Codes Airport and Aviation Law State Legislation Landlord /Tenant Water Law Taxation Utility Law Municipal Bonds Probate Economic Development Environmental Cleanup Services Tahoma Cemetery Search and Seizure Warrants Mandates *Public Disclosure Act •Growth Management Act *Subdivisions *Zoning *Environmental Review *Toxic Cleanup *Clean Air Act *Clean Water Act *Clean Drinking Water Act *Storm Water *Open Public Meetings Act • ELBA • HIPAA *Interest Arbitration *Driving Under the Influence (DUI) • Domestic Violence *Traffic Violations PROSECUTION DIVISION 11111 1 Cynthia Martinez, Supervisor • Prosecution: • Civil Forfeiture • Brooke Goosman •Bronson Faul • Wendy Winfield Maggie Mendoza, • JeffSchaap Legal Assistant Karen Ellis, Legal Assistant Colleen Brezo, Legal Assistant Cindy Thomas -Njai, Legal Assistant Temporary Legal Assistant CIVIL DIVISION I eft C tier. General Municipal and Pub 'ontracting elen Harvey: City Liability, Claims and ivil Litigation im Mitchell: Employment Law Mark Kunkler: Land Use and Planning Tonia Ramirez, Legal Assistant Brandi Bradford, Legal Assistant Pr secution Division b Hea and Safety Prosec ted 5,142 cases in 2011 DUI, Domestic Violence, Code Violations, theft • Appeared at 9,381 hearings in Municipal Court Contested Infraction Hearings • Subpoena witnesses, hearings and appeals ,.. • Vehicle and Animal impound hearings Civil Forfeiture • Advise Police and City Depts. • Public Records Act- Police Records Public Health & Safety/Resource Management Civil Division ! Ills i f \ / \ 1 a • Legal Rep entation • Public Obligations • Litigation, Claims, and City Liability • Employment Law • Contracts and Competitive Bidding Land Use and Planning iii +er low CITY OF YAKIMA MUNICIPAL COURT Prepared for the City Council Study Session on March 27, 2012 concerning Council's Strategic Priorities Ai MISSION STATEMENT . The Yakima Municipal Court is committed to the highest standard of conduct to preserve the integrity and independence of the judiciary. We strive to protect the dignity of and respect for all we serve. ORGANIZATIONAL CHART - MUNICIPAL COURT 2012 JUDGES Susan J. Woodard, Presidin Kelley C. Olwell maleouppoinmilimmtmemwmppug Court Services Manager Kevin G. Eilmes Linda S. Hagen /2 Time Court Commissioner 8.00 - -- Municipal Court Clerks .60 Permanent Part Time Clerk MUNICIPAL COURT JURISDICTION • Offenses Committed Within the City Limits Criminal and Traffic Misdemeanors and Gross Misdemeanors • Civil Traffic Infractions • Civil Non Traffic Infractions • Animal Control • Parking ▪ Juvenile Curfew /Tobacco Violations • Other Civil Hearings • Vehicle Impound • Animal Impound 2010 CASELOAD 15,171 Criminal — 2,649 Criminal Traffic — 2,695 including DUI violations Infractions — 9,778 including parking violations Other Civil cases — 5 vehicle /animal impound i ll STATE MANDATES • Court Certified Interpreters for non - English speaking or hearing impaired defendants. • Compensation and mileage for witnesses and jurors. ($10.00 per day and 55.5 cents per mile) • Legal representation for indigent persons. (85% of YMC defendants qualify for public defender) • Mandatory minimum sentencing for certain offenses. SENTENCING ALTERNATIVES TO JAIL Day Detention • Electronic Home Monitoring — eligibility criteria set by state law • Community Restitution • Ongoing collaboration for programs and services with Yakima County Probation STAFF TO JUDGE RATIO MUNICPIAL COURT ,1 36 COMPARISON BASED ON 2010 CASELOAD REPORT Total Total Municipal Staff to Filings Judicial Court Judicial Officers Clerks Officer Ratio Yakima 15,171 2.50 8.50 3.40 Bellingham 12,462 2.00 14.00 7.00 Kent 20,464 2.00 12.00 6.00 Renton 20,341 1.00 14.00 14.00 QUESTIONS? Public Works Department 150.8 Total FTEs This diverse department provides direct, essential and quality of life services that citizens cannot perform as individuals. Public Works and The City Council's Strategic Priorities Public Efficiency/ Economic Quality of Customer Strategic Top Three 1 Health & Fiscal Development Life Service Partnerships Choices Safety Stability Streets & Traffic 1 (Maintenance 1 I ($4.96 V Challenges) V V Million) Parks & Recreation (Funding _ I I I ($4.1 Priorities) V V V Million) Transit (Capital 1 1 I ($7.7 Program) V V `i Million) Refuse ($5.4 4 4 4 Million) Equipment Rental J J . J ($5.47 Million) Streets & Traffic 35 Total FTEs • Maintains over 380 center linemiles/82Olane miles of city streets and 44 miles of alleys • • 107 traffic signals, 40 r Nig school zone flashers & 5,000+ street lights • Over 25,000 signs to �" -- -`— - maintain Streets & Traffic Responsible for: — operating a safe and efficient road network for the benefit of Yakima's citizens, businesses and visitors. — preserving $550 Million in street infrastructure and $50 Million in traffic control devices. Streets & Traffic • Budgets prior to 2010 allowed for a 12- _ year cycle of preventive maintenance fus" for all streets s R 1v a' 4* t •"*"" """ • 2011— No chip sealing. Major repairs to selected streets segments. Preventive street maintenance reduced to patching and crack sealing. • Initiated a pavement maintenance program to better track & forecast street conditions M - • Annually sweep up 15,000 tons of material Parks & Recreation 20.3 Total FTEs Responsible for maintaining: • 353 acres of parkland for soccer, softball • t �� ' and general use at 33 different locations throughout the city, • a 12 -court tennis campus, • 16 playgrounds, • a year -round indoor pool, • an outdoor summer pool, y' • a nine -hole golf course, • a 16,000 square foot senior center, • 12 restrooms • 4.3 miles of pathway , and • Naches Blvd & Walter Ortman Parkway Par & Recreation Current Park Projects • Kiwanis Park Development • Randall Park Improvements ' • - and Bridge Replacement I 6' • Franklin Pool party area • 2012 — 2017 Parks & Recreation Comprehensive Plan — to be completed in April 2012 • Franklin Park Picnic Shelter • Walter Ortman Parkway — Canal Pathway extension Par & Recreation The Gateway Complex celebrates its seventh anniversary this year. More than 22 tournaments were held in the 2011 season — 5 of the tournaments were sponsored by Parks and Recreation, 17 were sponsored by outside agencies. The Gateway Complex is -- ` booked for tournaments 32 out of 34 1. possible weekends available during March 1— October 16 already in 2012. Approximately more than half of the tournament teams come from out of town bringing their family and friends with them. More than 3,000 local individuals /players signed up for Parks and Recreation leagues which support nearly 85% of direct program costs. Children In Parks & Recreation , , ,., ‘ f ,° , For more than a decade, city parks have r . g Iti.' hosted free summer playgrounds for ; ,, " IA' 14; :',‘" . A' t r . k Yakima youth to provide a safe and healthy ** - r i place to play. T‘ IL Alliv I V Pic 2 it e `', A Last year, Kissel Park was the location for the free Summer Program. The free after- s. 4 • -r . school program called "Beyond the Bell" �, provided over 4,500 children with ■ ( 40 homework help and recreation A P. . - I t. opportunities at Roosevelt Elementary. p .., y ` r 4:1, These two programs are approximately , ,,, ._ ,,,.. - $100,000 with no user revenue collected. Parks & Recreation Division Collaborations /Partnerships • Yakima Area Arboretum • Yakima School District • Hispanic Chamber of Commerce (Cinco de Mayo Festival) • West Valley School District • Allied Arts of Yakima Valley • Yakima Valley Sports Commission • Yakima Greenway Foundation (Kiddin' Around) • Yakima Youth Soccer Association • Yakima National Little League • Rotary, Kiwanis and Lions Clubs • Washington Interscholastic Activities Association Tahoma Cemetery 2 Total FTEs w *, a* ; he City of Yakima operates one of :.. ' ..41 ,_ " . I - '^: the few municipally owned { ` O L > cemeteries in the state. Tahoma is the resting place of many of '`` -- i <,-T : = Yakima's founding families and .` r , . I t is listed on the State Historic K Register. '41:. . 4..--r pn' . . ' .-,, - i„, ` vi. A our years ago the cemetery was — t T., _ expanded by 9 acres, providing an additional 9,000 new grave sites. Yakima Transit 52 Total FTEs Yakima Transit (YT) ridership exceeded 1.62 Million (highest ever) passengers in 2011. The breakdown for the system is as follows: Bus: 1,434,000 (fares, sales tax, federal support ~.' : _ Dial -A -Ride: ,000 (privatized) il l i r Va npoo l: 107,000 (self- funded) 83 - I Re 20.5 Total FTEs - Automated refuse and yard waste collection provide a safe and efficient method of service delivery as well as improving the appearance of our community. - In 2011 approximately 26,300 tons of refuse, 185 tons of leaves and 3,460 tons of yard debris were collected by the Refuse Division from nearly 24,000 accounts. - The Solid Waste Code Compliance Officer enforces refuse ordinances concerning scattered debris, illegal dumping, abandoned shopping cart, overfilled refuse containers, etc. - During 2011, 100 shopping carts were removed from public streets and alleys; nearly 2,000 illegally dumped tires were removed; and 20 tons of illegally dumped debris were cleaned up by the City. 09 S NACHES AVENUE • S r w � 14.1‘ Equipment Re nta 12 Total FTEs - Responsible for specification, acquisition, and maintenance of vehicles and rolling stock equipment for the City of Yakima operating divisions, excluding Police and Fire Departments. - The Equipment Rental Division is responsible for more than 540 pieces of equipment providing the diverse services required by the citizens of Yakima. - Replacement value of this fleet exceeds $18 million. - The critical responsibility of the Equipment Rental Division is maintaining this diverse fleet in a continuous state of readiness with safety of the citizenry and staff as a primary objective. - The revenues for Equipment Rental comes from the City's various user divisions, both enterprise and general fund. - The staff contingent consists of six maintenance technicians with repair and maintenance responsibilities and two fleet maintenance attendants responsible for safety inspections and lubrication services. This staffing level has remained unchanged for more than six years while the fleet has increased in size by 25% over the same period. - Equipment Rental's hourly shop rate has been maintained at a level below private maintenance and repair shops in the local area for many years, in great measure due to incorporation of the afternoon maintenance shift in 2005. "kW 111 I 'r:. r Ya ima Police Department _ • Greg Copeland, o ,�, Interim Chief \ ,, :, , , 4 , / ,,,,-, lk,„ - 4 ,,,,,, , Ai. r 441 la , '' Isive__ c 4 '.POLIC1 \ .1 34;4 52AA),61,43, 5 1886 o Aice n � . Statistical •� - ; /f R O verview �'* • 145 Commissioned Officers • 170 Total Staff • 58,720 Calls (2010) • 1.59 Officers per Thousand Population • 2,236 Traffic Collisions (2010) • 7,273 Total Part I Crime (2010) • 4,745 Total Arrests (2010) Major Components • Administrative Division, Capt. Greg Copeland • Patrol Division, Capt. Jeff Schneider • Detective Division, Capt. Rod Light • Special Operations Division, Capt. Rod Light • Services Division, Sheri Murphy A.q.,, 7 :4; 1 1 ‘ AOLIG� Ad ministrative Division • Internal Investigations, Lt. Nolan Wentz • Personnel • Timekeeping • Administrative Assistant • Budget Management • , •.. E • • 1+x h � �k�' ��R : 1T1 ;11 1�4+ P atrol Division Capt. Jeff Schneider • Three Lieutenants, Nine Sergeants • 80 Officers • 24/7 Street Patrol & Call Response • K 9 Unit, 3 Patrol Dogs, 2 Narcotics Dogs • Traffic Enforcement • SWAT Tactical & Negotiations • Police Reserves • Patrol Officer Distribution: — City Divided Into Nine Patrol Beats — Four Overlapping Shifts per Day; A, B, C, D, Squads Shift Hours: A 0630 -1710, B 0950 -2030, C 1700 -0340, D 2020 -0700 To Pik r . ' -* . pp' ki 'b,e. ..k. 0 s ( --44, 41 . - „, A // p .✓ `t , , , , 1 , . : f (., .,,, t ., .. .,,,, , _ _ i, ., . . ,. , ., . , -- f\, • 1 4111 - -0 - 0 " ' u. / see ! \ 4.1t; / OW W ' S. ' S. • ' .. ._ ..— ., { I Patrol Staffing • Officers 10hr 40 min Shifts; 5 days on 4 off • Minimum Staffing: - 0630 -0950 Four Officers, One Sergeant — 0950 -0340 Eight Officers, One Sergeant — 0340 -0630 Six Officers, One Sergeant 4.,. SI. pi ,- , � s k Ili ., as : ,_ . t , , . it: , , I ti f -- ,I A II i I . . . . SWAT - Tactical & Negotiation Unit • High Risk, High Threat Situations • On Call Region Wide Response • High Level of Capability q, J I ' MAIM ■ • 7 • ,40.44 vat -F3 • Traf Opera — One Sergeant, Four Motorcycle Officers — Accident Investigation — Technical Accident Reconstruction — Targeted Traffic Enforcement — Parades, Street Closures, Special Events ... _ 1 r. r ° . r - fir :: , 4 ,. , ' ` o f �"- `^' 1 , s •.._ 4. . ` �A \ ^ w . ~ ( � BUS _ .. 1 _ 1 ,. •( ' � 1 11!41114 ■ 1111 111 11111 .71!' A lu +I!.111{pl; � q'` J� / *i Atm& „ trir _____-. ,.,. , __ - ' ' „ * . r___,,,,A=.1. .., . 8 i i !1),... _, 1 _8, . . ___............. , , :_ .. .._ __ __ .„, .. ,. ,, .... ... _ ..... , .__.. . . , .,.„_... 4 ,..."' a J 'W Y Detective Division Capt. Rod Light • 17 Detectives, 4 Sergeants, 1 Lieutenant • Forensic Lab & Crime Scene Processing • 13,248 cases handled in 2010 • Crimes Against Persons (1 Sgt, 4 Detectives) - Robbery L - Arson - �'"`M'`= --�"'� "�`' - Assault 'er . k l - Missing Persons - Homicide „: a '' • Property Crimes (1 Sergeant, 4 Detectives) — Burglary — Auto Theft — Financial Crimes • Special Assault (1 Sergeant, 5 Detectives) — Runaways — Domestic Violence — Crimes Against Children — Sex Crimes — Sex Offender Tracking • Narcotics (1 Sergeant, 3 Detectives) Sp ecial Division Capt. Rod Light • Gan g Enforcement — One Sergeant, Four Officers — Proactive Gang Intelligence & Enforcement VIP i, __ I - - - 1 , - I A IF 411V: __ ` ` ,, a 1 . AVOW ., 4 A %A -11P n . ■ , ' ^----- I ' i j . r • Transit Enforcement — One Officer Paid for by Yakima Transit • School Resource Officers — Davis, Eisenhower, Washington, Lewis & Clark, Wilson & Franklin Middle Schools — Paid for by Yakima School District • Gang Resistance Education (GREAT) — One Officer • Community Services — One Sergeant, Two Officers - Police Athletic League (PAL) — Block Watch & Crime Free Rental Housing • Training - One Sergeant - Coordinates All Department Training • Gang Free Initiative — One Lt. /PIO - One coordinator (unfilled) - $140,000 program funding • Corrections — 3 Corrections Sergeants, 11 Corrections Officers — 78 Bed City Jail — Male Misdemeanor Offenders Only — Prisoner Transport — Courtroom Security — Home Detention 4 PP'"' Y i IT) z. _ ' 1 I , l S ervices Division Sheri Murphy • Complaint (10 Employees) — Telephone Reporting and other non - emergency reports — Gun Permits, Fingerprinting • Property (3 Employees) — Evidence Storage and Cataloging • Records (5 Employees) — Data Entry — Records Imaging — Public Disclosure — Files Maintenance Y akima Fire Department It is important that the members of the Yakima Fire Department uphold the highest moral and ethical standards set by generations of firefighters that have preceded us. _[ISSIONSTATEMENT COD O �' ?� fl C S • I will serve with courage and compassion, I w i l l safeguard a n d p r e s e r v e life a n d p r o p e r t y "Wewifprovic airrisk emergency and while maintaining proficiency in my profession. non - emergency services to our community. • I will never allow personal feelings to deter me f r o m my r e s p o n s i b i l i t i e s as a p r o f e s s i o n a l firefighter. I w i l l r e s p e c t t h e r i g h t s and b e l i e f s of a l l people, a n d w i l l a b i d e by t h e 1Ve are committed to serving with laws of my country. I am fully accepting of t h e i n h e r e n t d a n g e r s a c c o m p a n i e d by t h i s profession. courage and compassion as stewards of p1tbc ict rust. • I recognize my badge as a symbol of public UL t r u s t . I w i l l u p h o l d t h e t r a d i t i o n s O f my �� profession and will not harm or tarnish the standards set by my fellow firefighters. 'We shall` ave a positive antgenuine AS .4 MEMBER OF impact ail allwfwcaffuponus. THE YAKIMA FIRE DEPARTMENT, I A C C E P T THIS CODE O F ETHICS A S M Y RESPONSIBILITY AND DUTY. Maintain & Improve Public Health & Safet r_ The Yakima Fire Department's primary purpose is to preserve the health and safety of our citizens. Our department responds to nearly 10,000 calls per year. Approximately 95% of these calls are "HOT" calls where immediate intervention is required. We protect the public by providing the following services: — Fire extinguishment — Natural disaster mitigation - Medical emergency intervention ank — Water and ice rescue services - — Hazardous Materials accident mitigation f, — Technical rescue services ' — Mass casualty intervention I l aw — Fire and health preventative services to public and businesses, — Aviation fire and rescue services — Collapse and extrication — Fire investigation services - All other emergencies and non emergencies that the public calls for assistance +' All of these services are performed by the same individuals cross trained to required levels. 'oils fl 1 - Preserve & Enhance Yakima's Quality of Life I The Deputy Fire Marshal performs public outreach services of many kinds for the community, such as: t 4 • Edith House - A program that reaches every second grade student in the City to teach them about Fire Safety. •Fire Extinguisher /Fire Safety in the workplace • Public Information Services • Reserve Firefighter Program •Codes Interface allow •Fire Investigation Division Build & Utilize Strategic Partnerships The Fire Service in the Yakima Valley has developed an outstanding mutual aid system that combines all resources in the area iri'a short amount of time. Per City Council direction, we are in the process of exploring the feasibility of a Regional Fire Authority pp" in order to sustain strategic partnerships and At# provide excellent fire service in the future. „. �' 44a 31P4 4416410 1 10 .11 41 1 411Mi l li li t** alir" 4 1tri ' M =.91111111111611V 4 4210fr — • (---- ------- 2012 City Council Review of Strategic Priorities: Department of Community & Economic Development s w - . • . �` .CG. - -i - r l - ^ , . ." V r •' , - /11164 J �.ur.., y v * um .1 • _. . ! N. iim ' li G _y111 rr • X , R -A _h `` i 1 r nom wr • E IN. t ' �71Ti2iiii�S�� 1r • r r 1 - I 1 It • i in lio • , s a if • -4- .: • i Z •7 _ MC) lYlL' _ 1, '' r c 11111141114 -4,1P - 0 - - ` Department of r Communit & Econ Sri '.0 1.v bait , : 1 ' -' 1 Y ,p • Development '� ' ''� ` CED is responsible for a wide range of services that support new development, construction, code enforcement, preservation of neighborhoods, infrastructure projects, policy research and compliance with local, state and federal review requirements. These divisions provide significant citizen contact, permitting, licensing and much of the public hearing requirements for the city of Yakima. The Department administers multiple state and federal grant or loan programs. Strategic Priorities are identified for each Division, based on actual tasks. The following General Fund divisions are included in the Department: • Code Administration and Enforcement • Engineering Services • Planning Services Other Divisions in the CED Department are Enterprise Funds, including • Office of Neighborhood Development Services Community & Economic Development and City Council's Strategic Priorities Public Efficiency/ Economic Quality of Customer Strategic Health & Fiscal Development Life Service Partnerships Safety Stability Street 1 Engineering and J - J utility design Code Enforcemen J J J t 4 Support of all Planning 4 J city divisions and CED and development ONDS — No Senior General Safety 4 4 Fund projects Engineering Division Engineering Division — 11 FTE (6 funded by the general fund) ➢Manage Federal, State or locally funded Capital Projects >Support other City Division Capital Projects for Water, Wastewater, Parks, etc. >Review and Coordinate privately funded engineering projects for new development >Storm Water and Surface Water Management Program >Transportation Planning, Grant Writing >Local Improvement Projects Planning Division - Economic Development Tasks Planning Division — 6.35 FTE Staff— including CED Joan Davenport, Planning Manager(& Acting CED Director) 1 Planning Technician Administration 1 Supervising Planner 2010 = 10.35 FTE 1.75 Associate Planners* (.25 FTE shared with ONDS.* Will 2011 =7.35 FTE retire July 2012) 2012 = 6.35( *5.6 after July 1.6 Assistant Planners (.4 FTE shared with Parks) 2012) 350 319 310 Current Planning 300 258 Land Use 25 8 251 AEI Applications 250 235 224 By Year 220 209 - 214 200 ^� 161 \1 150 100 50 r 0 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Current Planning Permit Types - 4.35 Planners, I. Permit Technician Subdivision Ordinance ns Street Vacations, 1 alterations, exemptions treet plat tions p Public notice & participation requirements, Public Hearings, Council Review Authority: RCW 58.17 and YMC 14 Staff: Planners & Technician State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) Lead Agency Review, public notice, mandatory process Authority: RCW 43.21C and YMC 6.88 Staff: Planners & Technician, Manager Maintain Official Zoning Map and Regulations Public notice & participation requirements, public hearings, City Council Authority: RCW 35.63.110; RCW 36.70.560 and YMC 15 Staff: Planners & Technician, Manager National Flood Insurance Program (FIRM & FEMA), Shorelines Floodplain determinations, Critical Area permits, Shoreline applications Authority: RCW 86.16 and YMC 11 and 15 Staff: Planners Parade & Special Event Permits, Census, OFM, Support of other Divisions Provide community data, support and project review for a variety of programs Authority: Local Option process Staff: Planners & Technician, Manager Project Permit Applications, Appeals & Public Participation Procedural requirements from Regulatory Reform adopted in 1998 Authority: RCW 36.70B and YMC 16 Staff: Planners & Technician, Manager Long Range Planning Activities - Economic Development Growth Management Act, Comprehensive Plan Compliance & Support of Planning Commission Maintain Yakima Urban Comprehensive plan including annual amendments Authority: RCW 36.70A Staff: Planners & Technician, Manager Historic Preservation & Special Valuation Program Maintain Certified Local Government status, support Historic Preservation Commission Authority: WAC 254.20 and YMC 11.62 Staff: Associate Planner Annexation Proceedings Process citizen petitions for annexation & Council initiated actions or policy Authority: RCW 35.13 Staff: Supervising Planner Hearing Examiner - Economic Development Provides public hearing services under contract for land use regulatory items related to zoning, subdivision, street vacation and certain appeals. Professional service contract for Examiner and Examiner Pro Tern adopted on three —year basis. Some land use types have been referred to the City of Yakima Planning Commission as a cost containment measure. Actual Cases Budget 2010 =25 $62,537 2011 = 33 $39,500 2012 =10 projected $ 31,000 Economic Development Activities - 2012 Staff resources very limited. Available funds in 2012 for Industrial Development, other than CDBG = $116,680 2012 — Director position held by Planning Manager on Interim basis No Deputy Director or Economic Development Specialist No Office Administrator Office of Neighborhood Development Services - Quality of Life Issues Archie Matthews, Program Manager Program operates 2 Rehab Assistants without any General 1 Loan Specialist Fund. 1 Senior Program Supervisor 1 Accountin g Specialist ecialist 1 Bilingual Assistant Administers the City of Yakima Entitlements for Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) and HOME programs. Programs include Senior, Disabled and Low Income home repair, graffiti paint out, down payment assistance, Assistance in moderate and low income housing construction, Neighborhood Revitalization Strategy Area improvements and directs an annual average of 16,000 community volunteer hours. Code Enforcement staff are also supported by this program. Office of Code Administration Code Administration - 15 FTE 1 Manager Joe Caruso, Manager 1 Supervising Code Inspector Staffing levels 3 Building Inspectors 2010 = 19 FTE 3 Code Enforcement Officers — All 3 funded by CDBG 2011 = 17 FTE 2 Plan Review (1 commercial/ 1 residential) 2012 — 15 FTE 3 Permit Technicians 1 Supervising Code Office Administrator 1 Animal Control Officer (1 by contract at Humane Shelter) 1 Fire Inspector (eliminated 2012) ..:4104144410 -...0111111111111111111ff ¢ !l Public Safety Elements of Code Division Dangerous Building Repair and Demolition $17,000 — General Fund Support YPD in Chronic Nuisance investigations, implements Dangerous Building code Authority: WAC 51 -40 and YMC 11.46 Staff: Building Official, Building Inspectors Animal Control Officer $68,000 — 1 FTE funded by 3/10 CJ Tax Second Animal Control officer by contract fund at Humane Shelter Licensing and control of dogs Authority: Local Option program YMC 6.20 Staff: One animal control officer & one by contract with Humane Society Code Administration 10.59 FTE — funded through fees Building Permit - Includes permits and inspections for Building Code, Energy Code, Sign Code, Electrical Code, Housing Code, Mechanical Code, Plumbing Code, etc. Authority: WAC 51 -50 to WAC 51 -56 and YMC 11 Staff: Plan Review, Permit Technicians, Building Inspectors, Office Administrator Fire Marshal Duties Responsibility of Manager, General Fund Includes Uniform Fire Code enforcement, fire alarms, support of YFD Authority: WAC 51 -54 and YMC 10 Staff: Fire Marshal /Code Manager, (vacant Fire Inspector) Code Enforcement - Public Safet y Tasks Includes after hours Hotline, investigation and Site inspections enforcement for weedy lots, yard debris, graffiti, and 2010 = 2760 other violations 2011 = 2358 Authority: Local option process Notices Mailed Staff: 1 Permit tech and 3 Code Compliance officers, 2010 = 1094 funded through Community Development Block Grant 2011 = 1178 ,a f 4 . I if it ,..... .„ , y a . Rilm • g i — 1 ilaillk i I Regulatory Licenses issued by Code Division Business Licenses and Regulatory Permits Including dance halls, pool halls, taxi cabs, junk dealers, gambling, bingo pull -tab, card - rooms, liquor licenses pawn broker, ambulance, etc. Authority: RCW 49.12; 49.28; 9.46; 19.60; 18.73 and YMC 5.01 to YMC 5.80 Staff: 3 Permit Technicians Right of Way Use Permits, House Moves, banner permits, sidewalk cafes Permits for signs, walls, buildings other uses in right of way Authority: Local option permits YMC 8.20; YMC 11.58 Staff: 3 Permit Technicians These permits and licenses are Economic Development tasks.