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05/29/2012 00 Council General Information fi r , - 1";- ° , _ � t : L j � *� t YAKIMA CITY COUNCIL INFORMATION PACKET May 29, 2012 1. Council General Information • .,....,....„ .,,,„.,,,..,,,,,,,:.,,, c r ,,,,..„ , ,r),,, BUSINESS OF THE CITY COUNCIL YAKIMA, WASHINGTON AGENDA STATEMENT Item No. For Meeting of: May 29, 2012 ITEM TITLE: Council General Information SUBMITTED BY: CONTACT PERSON /TELEPHONE: SUMMARY EXPLANATION: 1. 5/24/12 Weekly Issues Report (with attachments) 2. 5/24/12 Memo to Council from Interim City Manager Morales re May 15, 2012 Interim City Manager Agreement Amendment 3. City Meeting Schedule for week of May 28 -June 4, 2012 4. Preliminary Future Activities Calendar as of May 28, 2012 5. Preliminary Council Agenda 6. 5/22/12 Letter from Doris Anderson regarding Senior Home Repair Program 7. Newspaper /Magazine /Internet Articles: • * "City to use 'assessment center' in fire chief search," The lndependent.com, May 24, 2012 * "Next Generation Sustainability," Public Management, June 2012 * "Counties saving big on health care costs," Middletown Journal, May 22, 2012 * "Judge silences Sussex County Council's prayer," Delmarvanow.com, May 24, 2012 * "Vallejo, Calif. once bankrupt, is now model for cities in an age of austerity," The Washington Post, May 23, 2012 Resolution Ordinance Other (specify) Contract: Mail to: Contract Term: Amount: Expiration Date: Insurance Required? No Funding Source: Phone: APPROVED FOR SUBMITTAL: .70/..,441/14, City Manager STAFF RECOMMENDATION: MEMORANDUM May 24, 2012 TO: The Honorable Mayor and City Council Members FROM: Michael Morales, Interim City Manager SUBJECT: Weekly Issues Report • INCOMING CITY MANAGER VISIT: Tony O'Rourke will be in town next Thursday and Friday. He will be meeting with a few department directors on Thursday afternoon; the full Council Friday morning; and individually with Council members Friday afternoon. • DYBID ASSESSMENT DISPUTE: Attached are copies of letters from JEM Development (the Tower, Hilton Garden Inn, Great Western Building, Bon Lofts, etc.) to YCCS disputing the validity of their BID assessment and refusal to pay. In our opinion, these assertions are false and we need to authorize YCCS to seek legal remedies to acquire payment, as it affects our ability to contract for services. • STATE SOFTBALL TOURNAMENTS IN YAKIMA: This Friday and Saturday the Gateway Complex will play host to the 2012 2B & 1B State High School Softball Championships. There will be 24 teams in all that will be competing in the tournament. The teams come from the 2B and 1B classification of high schools from all over the state of Washington. Games on Friday will begin at 9 am and run until 9 pm. Games on Saturday start at 10 am with the Championship games being played at 4 pm. • STREET & TRAFFIC OPERATIONS PROJECTS: The week of May 29 to June 1: the signal shop will be working on intersection preventive maintenance in the downtown area starting around Second Street and moving west. ♦The sign shop will be striping traffic lanes on and around 1 Street, then 16 Avenue and 40 Avenue. +They will also be finishing any stop bars and crosswalks east of 16 Avenue that they may have missed. They will then begin painting parking stalls in the downtown area. +Street crews will be crack sealing in area 25, between 64 and 80 Avenues south of Nob Hill Blvd. •They will also have pothole crews out city -wide as needed. ♦Sweeper crews will be working on a city -wide schedule. • 9� i { }A; ,,m .. May 22, 2012 a C,S; { i .3 0 1 DEVELOPMENT REAL ESTATE, INC. YCCS PO Box 9244 Yakima, WA 98909 THE TOWER, LLC Subject: 30 day notice to proceed with collection of Downtown Yakima Business MORRIER HOTEL, LLC Improvement District — Client ID# 70160 6111, Account # 00322839 -29 • MORRIER RANCH, INC BON LOFTS, LLC We have received a 30 day Notice (a form letter) advising us that we owe $290.47. JEM PROPERTIES, LLC The said letter advises if we dispute the validity of the claimed debt, that we should write to 402 E.YAI<IMA AVE. you within 30 days stating that we dispute the validity of this debt. It is our understanding that the City of Yakima did not receive the approval of the affected business property owners SUITE 1200 whose property is included within the referenced BID when the city sought to establish the YAKIMA, WA 98901 BID after the initial vote of the affected property owners had expired, and the city failed to resubmit the BID to the property owners thereafter. PHONE (509) 248-4040 ACCORDINGLY, YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED THAT THIS COMPANY DOES DISPUTE ANY CLAIM FAX (509) 457-8361 BY THE CITY OF YAKIMA OF A RIGHT TO COLLECT ALL OR ANY PART OF THE HEREINABOVE DESCRIBED DEBT. Sincerely yours, www.jemdevelopment.com Naches Hotel, LLC JEM Development Real Estate, Inc., Manager _ ,■ , / .'' - ye— t--- Joseph R. Morrier, President c cc: City of Yakima Finance Department 5 • ■ ® • • J.s e.--0 May 22, 2012 y t7 DEVELOPMENT REAL ESTATE, INC. YCCS PO Box 9244 Yakima, WA 98909 THE TOWER. LLC Subject: 30 day notice to proceed with collection of Downtown Yakima Business MORRIER HOTEL, LLC Improvement District — Client ID# 70134 6082, Account # 00322834 -24 MORRIER RANCH, INC BON LOFTS, LLC We have received a 30 day Notice (a form letter) advising us that we owe $129.56. JEM PROPERTIES, LLC The said letter advises if we dispute the validity of the claimed debt, that we should write to 402 E YAKIMA AVE. you within 30 days stating that we dispute the validity of this debt. It is our understanding that the City of Yakima did not receive the approval of the affected business property owners SUITE 1200 whose property is included within the referenced BID when the city sought to establish the YAKIMA, WA 98901 BID after the initial vote of the affected property owners had expired, and the city failed to resubmit the BID to the property owners thereafter. PHONE (509) 248-4040 ACCORDINGLY, YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED THAT THIS COMPANY DOES DISPUTE ANY CLAIM FAX (509) 457-8361 BY THE CITY OF YAKIMA OF A RIGHT TO COLLECT ALL OR ANY PART OF THE HEREINABOVE DESCRIBED DEBT. Sincerely yours, www.jemdevelopment.com JEM Properties, LLC ' ' I Elizabeth McGree, Member cc City of Yakima Finance Department ■ f May 22, 2012 _, , e :.,,, ,,..:.; , ,,,,,„, , A DEVELOPMENT REAL ESTATE, INC. YCCS PO Box 9244 Yakima, WA 98909 THE TOWER, LLC Subject: 30 day notice to proceed with collection of Downtown Yakima Business MORRIER HOTEL, LLC Improvement District — Client ID# 70162 6113, Account # 00322841 -04 MORRIER RANCH, INC BON LOFTS, LLC We have received a 30 day Notice (a form` letter) advising us that we owe $1870.00. JEM PROPERTIES, LLC The said letter advises if we dispute the validity of the claimed debt, that we should write to 402 E.VAKIMA AVE. you within 30 days stating that we dispute the validity of this debt. It is our understanding that the City of Yakima did not receive the approval of the affected business property owners SUITE 1200 whose property is included within the referenced BID when the city sought to establish the YAKIMA, WA 98901 BID after the initial vote of the affected property owners had expired, and the city failed to resubmit the BID to the property owners thereafter. PHONE (509) 248-4040 ACCORDINGLY, YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED THAT THIS COMPANY DOES DISPUTE ANY CLAIM FAX (509) 457 -8361 BY THE CITY OF YAKIMA OF A RIGHT TO COLLECT ALL OR ANY PART OF THE HEREINABOVE DESCRIBED DEBT. Sincerely yours, www.jemdevelopment.com Mor.ie LLC �� L �� ,--?- v' ,___., Joseph R. Morrier, Mana er cc: City of Yakima Finance Department • w • ® ■ i ry s , ` 3 c, 1� ' PY I� u . s -y e ' ' Y-7 �� ,�° May 22, 2012 DEVELOPMENT REAL ESTATE, INC. YCCS PO Box 9244 Yakima, WA 98909 THE TOWER, LLC Subject. 30 day notice to proceed with collection of Downtown Yakima Business MORRIER HOTEL, LLC Improvement District — Client ID# 70161 6112, Account # 00322840 -42 MORRIER RANCH, INC BON LOFTS, LLC We have received a 30 day Notice (a form letter) advising us that we owe $315.67. JEM PROPERTIES, LLC The said letter advises if we dispute the validity of the claimed debt, that we should write to 402 E.YAKIMA AVE. you within 30 days stating that we dispute the validity of this debt. It is our understanding that the City of Yakima did not receive the approval of the affected business property owners SUITE 1200 whose property is included within the referenced BID when the city sought to establish the YAKIMA, WA 98901 BID after the initial vote of the affected property owners had expired, and the city failed to resubmit the BID to the property owners thereafter. PHONE (509) 248 -4040 ACCORDINGLY, YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED THAT THIS COMPANY DOES DISPUTE ANY CLAIM FAX (509) 457 -8361 BY THE CITY OF YAKIMA OF A RIGHT TO COLLECT ALL OR ANY PART OF THE HEREINABOVE DESCRIBED DEBT. Sincerely yours, www.jemdevelopment.com Morrier Family Realty ii k,ACU Elizabeth McGree, Member cc: City of Yakima Finance Department • !D ® ® 10 . • May 22, 2012 DEVELOPMENT REAL ESTATE, INC. YCCS PO Box 9244 Yakima, WA 98909 THE TOWER, LLC Subject: 30 day notice to proceed with collection of Downtown Yakima Business MORRIER HOTEL, LLC Improvement District — Client ID# 70197 6153, Account'# 00322844 -06 MORRIER RANCH, INC BON LOFTS, LLC We have received a 30 day Notice (a form letter) advising us that we owe $1982.38. JEM PROPERTIES, LLC The said letter advises if we dispute the validity of the claimed debt, that we should write to you within 30 days stating that we dispute the validity of this debt. It is our understanding 402 E. YAKIMA AVE. that the City of Yakima did not receive the approval of the affected business property owners SUITE 1200 whose property is included within the referenced BID when the city sought to establish the YAKIMA, WA 98901 BID after the initial vote of the affected property owners had expired, and the city failed to resubmit the BID to the property owners thereafter. PHONE (509) 248 -4040 ACCORDINGLY, YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED THAT THIS COMPANY DOES DISPUTE ANY CLAIM FAX (509) 457 -8361 BY THE CITY OF YAKIMA OF A RIGHT TO COLLECT ALL OR ANY PART OF THE HEREINABOVE DESCRIBED DEBT. Sincerely yours, www.jemdevelopment.com The Tower, LLC JEM Development Real Estate, Inc., Manager , Joseph R. Morrier, President cc. City of Yakima Finance Department • ® • ■ } - a May 22, 2012 DEVELOPMENT REAL ESTATE, INC YCCS PO Box 9244 Yakima, WA 98909 THE TOWER, LLC Subject: 30 day notice to proceed with collection of Downtown Yakima Business MORRIER HOTEL. LLC Improvement District — Client ID# 70302 6051, Account # 00322822 -13 MORRIER RANCH, INC BON LOFTS, LLC We have received a 30 day Notice (a form letter) advising us that we owe $253.41. JEM PROPERTIES, LLC The said letter advises if we dispute the validity of the claimed debt, that we should write to 402 E.YAKIMA AVE. you within 30 days stating that we dispute the validity of this debt. It is our understanding that the City of Yakima did not receive the approval of the affected business property owners SUITE 1200 whose property is included within the referenced BID when the city sought to establish the YAKIMA, WA 98901 BID after the initial vote of the affected property owners had expired, and the city failed to resubmit the BID to the property owners thereafter. PHONE (509) 248.4040 ACCORDINGLY, YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED THAT THIS COMPANY DOES DISPUTE ANY CLAIM FAX (509) 457.8361 BY THE CITY OF YAKIMA OF A RIGHT TO COLLECT ALL OR ANY PART OF THE HEREINABOVE DESCRIBED DEBT. Sincerely yours, www.jemdeve lopment.com Bon Lofts, LLC c Joseph R. Morrier, Manager cc. City of Yakima Finance Department 111 • = ■ j • May 22, 2012 . DEVELOPMENT REAL ESTATE, INC. YCCS PO Box 9244 Yakima, WA 98909 THE TOWER, LLC Subject: 30 day notice to proceed with collection of Downtown Yakima Business MORRIER HOTEL, LLC Improvement District — Client ID# 70342 6896, Account # 00322860 -13 MORRIER RANCH, INC BON LOFTS, LLC We have received a 30 day Notice (a form letter),advising us that we owe $1001.56. JEM PROPERTIES, LLC The said letter advises if we dispute the validity of the claimed debt, that we should write to 402 E.YAKIMA AVE . you within 30 days stating that we dispute the validity of this debt. It is our understanding that the City of Yakima did not receive the approval of the affected business property owners SUITE 1200 whose property is included within the referenced BID when the city sought to establish the YAKIMA, WA 98901 BID after the initial vote of the affected property owners had expired, and the city failed to resubmit the BID to the property owners thereafter. PHONE (509) 248-4040 ACCORDINGLY, YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED THAT THIS COMPANY DOES DISPUTE ANY CLAIM FAX (509).457 -8361 BY THE CITY OF YAKIMA OF A RIGHT TO COLLECT ALL OR ANY PART OF THE HEREINABOVE DESCRIBED DEBT. Sincerely yours, www.jemdevelopment.com JEM Develop ent Real Estate, Inc. Joseph R. Morrier, President cc: City of Yakima Finance Department • ® • MEMORANDUM TO: Honorable Mayor Micah Cawley Members of the Yakima City Council FROM: Michael A. Morales, Interim City Manager DATE: May 24, 2012 SUBJECT: May 15, 2012 Amendments to Interim City Manager agreement approved by City Council Thank you for agreeing to amend the compensation and tenure of my agreement on May 15, 2012. While compensation adjustments and term of the agreement was discussed at the onset of my tenure as Interim City Manager, and article 6.2 of the agreement addresses the issue, the City Attorney has reviewed some information that raises a degree of uncertainty as to whether the council could have agreed to adjust my compensation concurrent with the term of the contract. I do not believe it to be in the city's best interest to create a potential audit issue with the retroactivity portion of the compensation, nor do I believe it is worthwhile to pursue other mechanisms to make the adjustment moving forward (raising the pay step, bank of additional vacation hours, increased deferred compensation, etc.). Therefore, the council action to adjust compensation and extend the term of the agreement is effective May 15, 2012, the date of council action. The compensation adjustment will only be part of the last 45 days (approx.) of employment as Interim City Manager, and will end upon the next city manager taking the oath of office. The city attorney has drafted the changes per your direction, and they will be executed today. I appreciate the confidence expressed by your vote, and I believe that this would have been available to me at any time during my tenure. There were simply other priority issues to deal with as your administrator over these past 5 months. Please call if you have any questions. CITY MEETING SCHEDULE For May 28, 2012 — June 4, 2012 Please note: Meetings are subject to change Monday, May 28 HOLIDAY — CITY OFFICES CLOSED Tuesday, May 29 10:00 a.m. County Commissioners Agenda Meeting — Council Chambers 1:00 p.m. GFI Executive Committee Meeting — Mayor's Office Friday, June 1 8:00 a.m. Sister City Meeting — CED Conference Room 10:00 a.m. City Council Special Meeting — Council Chambers Monday, June 4 10:00 a.m. City Council Media Briefing — Council Chambers 3:30 p.m. Civil Service Commission Meeting — Council Chambers Office Of Mayor /City Council Preliminary Future Activities Calendar Please Note: Meetings are subject to change Meeting. " Organization, � , "'Meeting- "Purpose""' " Participants Meeting Location 4 G , n ., „ gyp t. S. ate/Time , , Mon. May 28 HOLIDAY - CITY OFFICES CLOSED .,., a .. ,.. ...,... _. ,....rv..... ,.. _,w...: _.. _.. ..._......., ......., w.. . . , • Tue. May 29 11.30 a m Miscellaneous Issues Scheduled Meeting Cawley, Adkison TBD 1 00 p.m. GFI Executive Committee Scheduled Meeting Coffey, Adkison, Mayor's Office Meetin • Ettl Wed. May 30 1200 p.m. YVVCB Board Meeting Board Meeting Adkison YVCC Winery Training Fri. June 1 �.... Facilit r - Grand view 8:00 a m Sister City Meeting Scheduled Meeting Adkison CED Conference Room 10:00 a m City Council Special Scheduled Meeting Council Council Chambers Meetin Mon. June 4 1000 a m. City Council Media Briefing Scheduled Meeting Coffey Council Chambers Tue. June 5 12:00 p m. Miscellaneous Issues Scheduled Meeting Cawley, Adkison TBD 4 30 p m City Council Executive Scheduled Meeting Council Council Chambers Session 6.00 p m City Council Meeting Scheduled Meetin Council Council Chambers Thur. June 7 9 00 a m 911 Joint Board Meeting Board Meeting Lover Toppenish 4 30 p m. GFI Steering Committee Scheduled Meeting Coffey, Adkison, CWCMH Meeting Ettl 6 p m. Regional Fire Authority Scheduled Meeting Cawley, Adkison, Station 86 Coffey 69 .m Valle Ma or's Meetin Scheduled Meetin• Cawle To. •enish Sat. June 9 11.00 a.m. William O'Douglas Trail Scheduled Event Open Davis High School Dedication Ceremon Mon. June 11 �...� ,,....m ... w �.,s�.. _.���.» ..� ��,�wm��� , s • e��� . �.��, _�, �..w_..� �.,��.. ....�. w 8 a m. Pension Board Meetings Board Meeting Coffey Human Resources Conference Room Tue. June 12 12 00 •.m Miscellaneous Issues Scheduled Meetin• Cawle , Adkison TBD Wed. June 13 10 00 a m. Council Nominating Scheduled Meeting Adkison, Ensey, Mayor's Office Committee Bristol • 3 30 p.m. Planning Commission Scheduled Meeting Ensey Council Chambers Meeting .:30 p m. Parks Commission Meeting Scheduled Meeting Adkison Council Chambers Thur. June 14 �a����.. 1.00 p m Harman Center Board Board Meeting Cawley, Adkison Harman Center Meeting 1 30 p m Yakima Regional Clean Air Scheduled Meeting Lover Council Chambers Meeting 3 p m. YAKCORPS Executive Board Meeting Cawley CED Conference Room Board 5 30 p.m YCDA Board Me etin Board Meeting A dkison New Vision Offices PRELIMINARY FUTURE COUNCIL AGENDA May 29 NO SCHEDULED BUSINESS MEETING — info packet on 5/24 June 5 4:30 p.m. Executive Session — Council Chambers 6:00 p.m. Business Meeting — Council Chambers • Recognition of City Employee Tim Cruz • Proclamation — Arts logo contest • Proclamation — Parker Youth Sports Proclamation • Resolution amending Resolution No. R- 2010 -60 adopted May 18, 2010, and amending Resolution No. R -2011 -143 adopted September 6, 2011, and authorizing an Interfund Loan from the equipment rental fund to the Parks Capital Fund in an amount not to exceed $600,000 in replacement of the prior authorization to draw such amount from the City's line of credit • Ordinance amending Chapter 1.18 YMC pertaining to designation of administrative departments and functions of the City of Yakima • Review first quarter financial reports: o Accounts receivable o Treasury report • Consideration of license agreement for Smoke Out Choke Out event • Consideration of changing time of July 3, 2012 Council meeting from 6:00 p.m. to 10:00 a.m. • Approve agreement with Yakima County for 2013 jail services • Set date of June 19, 2012 as open record public hearing to consider a Resolution to surplus City owned property 7.00 p.m. Public Hearing — Council Chambers 5/24/2012 9 AM 1 t .1 / 6 S. 1 /r4 tvv-( vcjz ova `l % ° c - 1 aye SV}' n )i A 4. \ r #." ‘^-/ J � � „„..)--tr P / k ' v 't'tX t.y ._ ,,,,4, ,.: ,,, s ; f:::_ e_;1„,/ , 1 , e 0. v A a z ' RECEIVED Of CITY OF YAKIMA ¢' s n MAY 222012 .�y OFFICE OF CITY COUNCIL t 7 City to use `assessment center' in fire chief search - The Grand Island Independent : Loca... Page 1 of 1 City to use 'assessment center' in fire chief search By Tracy Overstreet tracy.overstreet @theindependent.com I Posted: Tuesday, May 22, 2012 10:45 pm The City of Grand Island is going to try something new when it starts the process to hire a fire chief. Instead of having the city Human Resources Department conduct tests of applicants, an outside firm will do that work. "We are working to identify an assessment center that we will be working with," said City Administrator Mary Lou Brown. "That is underway. We're looking at using an external party for that for this position." As assessment center would do testing for leadership skills, she said. The assessment center testing will only be done for the fire chief position. It was not used in the search for a finance director, a public works director, a city attorney, or a utilities director, which have all been replaced under Brown's tenure since December 2010. Neither will the assessment center be used in an upcoming search for a parks and recreation director after the June 1 retirement of Parks and Recreation Director Steve Paustian. Brown said the assessment center work is really specific to the fire chief position. "There's testing that needs to take place and the testing that has been done in the past has been using a test for a battalion chief," she said. "We really are looking for some different skills at the fire chief level, so this is one way to get that." Brown said the city is ready to notify the Civil Service Commission that the city wants to begin advertising for the fire chief position. Notice will go to the commission, which meets Friday. The Civil Service Commission oversees employment issues for public safety positions. The city is under court order to have a fire chief or interim chief named by June 11. The city has been without a permanent chief since October 2011. http : / /www.theindependent.com/news /local /city -to- use - assessment - center -in- fire - chief- sea... 5/24/2012 commentary I think of kids i ' • - li r litell ,_ ,_... . i if BY CRAIG MALIN, ICMA -CM NEXT GE ERAT�ON ;- - ,...„., e future, dgn't be constriined by the p st • Ii ' ' * it n a 2007 resolution, ICMA members a higher purpose. For clarity about why than it has ever had, and the number con affirmed their commitment to building we are obliged to transmit our commu times to rise in the postrecession era. sustainable communities, referencing nity, my suggestion is to visit a park, a Of the 3,142 counties in the nation, the ancient Athenian Oath to "transmit school, or a juvenile detention center. 653 counties saw significant increases this city, not only not less, but greater and We work for kids. in poverty for children ages 5 to 17 from more beautiful, than it was transmitted While we respect and honor the past, 2007 to 2010. Only eight counties saw a to us." Five years have passed, and the we work for the future. Managers work decrease. Childhood poverty, hunger, poor evidence strongly suggests we have not for the next generation. We work to pass health, and social disconnection have life - been successful, particularly with passing on our community's collective social long consequences, constrain individual on what was provided to us, in some capital, in ever - increasing increments, potential, and limit the success of nations measure greater than we received it. to those who haven't yet thought about and the communities within them. To whom, exactly, are we —local voting or paying taxes. Public education, that time- tested government managers— supposed to trans- We work for those who see the path from poverty, has been similarly mit the communities where we occupy world as it can and should be, rather hard- pressed. In 1970, America led 1 leadership positions? Developers? Bankers? than how it is or was. We work for the world in high school and college Property owners? The citizens who elect kids. When we do our jobs well, kids graduation. Today, we are 21st in high our bosses? The next city manager or have more social capital and more school completion and 15th in college 1 county administrator who replaces us? opportunities for brighter, greater, completion. Every day, more than 7,200 This is the rather mundane reality and more beautiful futures. Plus, our high school students drop out. that too many in the profession accept. communities prosper with personal, For the class that entered high school Although this approach may pay the intergenerational sustainability. in 2007, the national graduation rate bills, it is not the stuff of legend, stands at 68.8 percent. The typical high worthy of an ancient oath that inspires Supposed to Be, But Isn't school dropout loses $260,000 in re- a noble profession. That is how it is supposed to work, but it duced earnings over a lifetime. Dropouts' Our profession is more than that. Our hasn't of late. The latest U.S. census data aggregate, cumulative costs to communi- profession comes with an obligation to indicate 21.6 percent of American children ties and the nation in reduced earnings truly, transformatively transmit the com- live in poverty. America has more and in increased public expenses is munities of which we are the stewards to impoverished children today, 16.4 million, crippling, with every four -year cohort of 28 PUBLIC MANAGEMENT 1 JUNE 2012 icma.org /pm ICMA • IN THE DAILY EFFORT TO LEAD LOCAL GOVERN— MENTS DON'T BE WHOLLY CONSUMED BY THE Calendar of Events MINUTIAE OF THE PRESENT. BY ALL MEANS For information about ICMA events DON'T BE CONSTRAINED BY THE PAST. FOCUS visit icma.orq/calendar ON THE FUTURE. UPCOMING EVENTS high school dropouts costing taxpayers a our operations, suggest changes, and trillion dollars over their lifetimes. expect that those suggestions be taken ICMA UNIVERSITY WORKSHOP If you think that poverty is the seriously. They should be encouraged to purview of priests and that education is challenge us with their dreams as they Asking Your Police and Fire Chiefs the province of principals, you're wrong. inspire us with their pluck. the Right Questions to Get the Right Unmet social needs that compromise You should expect raised eyebrows Answers your community's future are your prob- from the cynical. You should expect push- ■ June 11 Washington, DC lem. They demand the community's full back and even some sharp elbows from attention, and they require sustainable those who want you back in your narrow solutions founded on inclusive engage- lane. But you should also expect success, APPLICATION DEADLINES ment and earnest, ethical, nonpartisan as innovative ideas spring forth and problem solving that is our profession's transformative relationships are forged. • June 30 Leadership ICMA stock in trade. The fact is that community involve- icma.org /LEAD All the green roofs, all the LED ment works. Linking Local and social July 1 Credentialing Program • streetlights, and all the metallic flavors services to schools works. Building of LEED- certified buildings absolutely collaboration among teachers, parents, pale in comparison to a committed focus and community members works. Making on building social capital for the next schools the center of a community's generation. That is sustainability. energy and progress works. Involvement at the personal level also t ia : im i miit w / � Committed and In volved works. Mentors can cut illegal drug use � Local government leaders need to break and school truancy and dropout rates 98 AL COENCE out of narrow, tradition -bound lanes, in half (Big Brothers Big Sisters, http: // P H E I X for the status quo of slow decline is, www.bbbs.org /site /c.9iILI3NGKh � I � GC � dt uH assuredly, not sustainable. We need to b .7721455 /k.6CBF /Our_impact_on_ challenge mediocrity, confront Mac- education.htm) and reduce pregnancy tion, and call out phrases like "the new rates for at -risk teens (Claire Brindis and OCTOBER 7 -10 , 2 01 2 normal" for what they are: weak -willed Laura Davis, Linking Pregnancy Preven- excuses of the comfortably lethargic. tion to Youth Development, http: / /www. IMPORTANT DATES We need to support partners wher- advocatesforyouth.org /storage /advfy/ ever they may be found in pursuit of documents /communitiesresponding • June 18 Registration and Housing improving the lives of children as a pdf). Taking responsibility for connecting Or Opens fundamental, measurable community kids to a brighter future works. Or 27 First Registration Deadline goal. We need to personally commit and In the daily effort to lead local September 7 Second Registration be personally involved, both to have a governments, don't be wholly consumed e P tangibly informed perspective and to be by the minutiae of the present. By all Deadline credible in our unabashed expectation means, don't be constrained by the past. that everyone has a role to play in our Focus on the future. The essence of community's brighter future. sustainability is our children, well For more information, visit We need to listen to children and prepared to shape our future. PII empower them with our time and iclna.org/coference2012 willing spirit. Children should be an CRAIG MALIN, ICMA -CM, is city integral part of community planning ef- administrator, Davenport, Iowa (ctm@ Twitter: ICMAConference ci.davenport.ia.us). forts. They should play a role on boards Tweet: 11ICMAl2 and commissions. They should review icma.org /pm ,2 074 Counties saving big on health care costs Page 1 of 3 i 1I ILEi'I) \ . s k �� V' . ,, l Print this page -? Close Counties saving big on health care costs Workers paying higher deductibles; wellness programs on the rise. By Joanne Huist Smith, Staff Writer 9 04 PM Tuesday, May 22, 2012 Switching to high deductible plans coupled with incentives for staff who get annual check -ups and health screenings is shaving thousands of dollars — and in one case, millions — off what local counties are paying for employee health care. Assistant Montgomery County Administrator Amy Wiedeman said the changes are helping the county hold down the rising cost of health care — a $50 million a year expense — for its 3,200 employees by up to $4 million a year. Lisa Hale, director of risk management in Greene County, said that after five years of offering wellness incentives to county employees, the cost for health care and the number of catastrophic illnesses both are on the decline. "We know from talking with employees we have dodged serious health events," said Hale, adding that the total cost of Greene County's employee health care is about $ii million a year. "We did reduce our costs 2 percent, and we feel that the Wellness Incentive Plan helped with that result." In an attempt to control costs, employers increasingly are turning to wellness programs, although the payoff remains unclear, according to a 2011 study by the Center for Studying Health System Change. Tammy Whitaker, employee benefits /safety officer for Warren County, said it's hard to quantify the cost saving of wellness programs. "It's the cancer treatment we will not be paying in the future because of a health screening, or a diabetic with sugar levels under control who won't have to deal with complications later on," she said. Hale and Wiedeman say the benefits are two -fold. "We're spending health care dollars much more wisely, and we're getting a healthier workforce," Wiedeman said "It's a better deal for employees and it's a better deal for taxpayers because it provides more money for direct services." Health care costs for Montgomery County's employees had been increasing about 11 percent per year since 2005, faster than the 9 percent national average. Wiedeman said Montgomery County's health care costs were higher because its workforce suffered from diseases such as diabetes at rates higher than the national average. "We were seeing costs go up every year while our revenue was decreasing," she said. Annual health care membership plans for Montgomery County employees were projected to leap from $15,089 per employee in 2011 to $22,355 by 2014. The county pulled together a health care benefits task force in November 2010 to address the rising costs. What they found, as a self - http: / /www.middletownj ournal. com/news /middletown- news / counties - saving- big -on- health... 5/24/2012 Counties saving big on health care costs Page 2 of 3 insured organization, the bulk of costs were from claims and the most prevalent illnesses were related to lifestyle choices, such as high blood pressure and diabetes. "That's when we decided to put in a health care plan with wellness incentives," said Wiedeman, adding that the change to high - deductible plans was launched on July 1. All county employees are eligible for up to $1,200 a year for a number of incentives such as being tobacco free. If they are in the high - deductible health plan, the funds are deposited in their health savings account. If they are on the traditional health plan, it is deducted from their monthly premium contribution. "It's made a difference," Wiedeman said. "We're saving $3 million to $4 million a year. We've been able to offset some state cuts through this." Much of the savings, Wiedeman said, comes from employees making wiser health care choices. When you have a high - deductible health care plan, people are more likely to check prices, Wiedeman said. Montgomery County employees are challenged to stretch dollars spent on medical expenses by considering generic drugs or finding a family doctor instead of making regular trips to an emergency room. Medical costs still are rising under the new plan, but at a slower pace, Wiedeman said. About 3o percent of Montgomery County's employees opted for a high - deductible plan. Hale said wellness incentives have been offered to Greene County's 85o full -time employees for five years. The county has 22 goals or incentives that employees may choose from that range from getting an annual check -up, keeping cholesterol under 200, maintaining a recommended body mass, getting a flu shot, meeting a physical fitness goal or getting certain health screenings. "If you meet goals, you are rewarded," Hale said. Employees on family plans who meet eight goals and those on single plans who meet five goals get a one -month premium holiday, or a month free from their 20 percent medical plan contribution. Miami County Commissioner Richard Cultice on Friday said the county, which is self- insured, is currently re- evaluating its employee health care plan. Warren County spent about $16 million on health care benefits in 2011. Whitaker said the county is trying to reduce that figure by bringing health - related programs right to the office, like an annual blood draw. In 2011, 671 Warren County employees (out of the 924 eligible) got an extra paid day off work because they participated in the blood screening program. The test results — for blood sugar and cholesterol levels — were sent to the employee's home or directly to a personal physician. "Employees are getting on board. They are thinking about longevity and quality of life," Whitaker said. Find this article at: [ Print this page jJ Close http: / /www.middletownj ournal.com/news /middletown- news /counties- saving- big -on- health... 5/24/2012 Format Dynamics :: CleanPrint :: http:// www. delmarvanow .com/article /20120522/DW01/... Page 1 of 2 1 / D f' I, M A IS V A AA IS h l A G 77 O u Judge s Prayer. Sussex County Sussex officials had sought to have the lawsuit dismissed, arguing the prayer was Council's pryer a simple call for spiritual guidance and did not favor any religion, and challenged the standing of the plaintiffs to sue. GEORGETOWN -- A federal court judge "Whatever happened to freedom of ruled that Sussex County Council must stop speech ?" Councilman Sam Wilson said. "I reciting the Lord's Prayer as each council don't know how we're gonna get around it, meeting begins because it violates the but we're gonna have to find a way." Constitution Sussex County government spokesman U S. District Court Judge Leonard P. Stark's Chip Guy said the county was aware of the opinion issuing a temporary injunction decision but had not reviewed it with supports the claims of four Sussex county attorneys residents that the county's routine action breaches the First Amendment. "We will be doing that and weighing our options," Guy said The residents sued the county last year seeking to end the council's practice. The Lord's Prayer begins "Our Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be thy name," and The court "is likely to conclude that the is commonly used by Protestants and Council's practice of opening each meeting Catholics. with a recitation of this distinctly Christian Lord's Prayer violates the Establishment Alex Luchenitser, an attorney with Clause because it constitutes government endorsement of the Christian faith," Stark Advertisement wrote in his opinion "The fact that The Lord's Prayer has been the only prayer recited at the beginning of Council meetings for over six years is likely to be found to demonstrate that the Council gives Christianity an unconstitutionally preferred status " Stark's injunction takes effect June 15 but doesn't end the lawsuit. The council would violate the court order if it began its scheduled June 19 meeting with the Lord's Print Powered By µ, r:KK- ' ;t gnarnics http://www.delmarvanow.com/fdcp/?unique=1337878113427 5/24/2012 Format Dynamics :: CleanPrint :: http:// www. delmarvanow .com /article /20120522/DW01/... Page 2 of 2 D E L M A R V A M E D I A G R O U P Americans United for Separation of Church AdChoices and State, said he is "very pleased with the Ads by Pulse 360 court's decision." His group represents Email Marketing - Free plaintiffs Barbara Mullin, Julie Jackson, John Email Marketing to Fit Your Needs. Try it FREE now! Steinbruck and William O'Connor. www icontact.com Yakima: Mom is 57 looks 27 The judge's order cites a similar recent How Yakima Mom Discovered a "Weird" $5 Trick To lawsuit over prayer in Sussex County, in Erase which the Indian River School District was consumerlifestyletrends corn/ sued over the Christian prayers led by 5 Diet Pills that Work 2012's Top 5 Weight Loss Pills. Updated Consumer officials at board meetings. A court order Ratings. Free Report. to end them was upheld by the 3rd Circuit www DietRatings org Court of Appeals. The judge noted many governments across the country begin meetings with prayers that are not specific calls on Christian belief, as he contended the Lord's Prayer is. Both the county and the plaintiffs should think, he said, about how "to preserve the Council's practice of opening its meetings with a prayer but to do so in a manner that is consistent with the United States and Delaware Constitutions." The judge ordered both sides to hold a conference call with him last week to Ad vertisement discuss the next steps in the case jfisher @delawareonline.com 302 - 983 -6772 On Twitter @JamesFisherTNJ Print Powered By ( if,.Forrnat:Dy http: // www.delmarvanow.com/fdcp/ ?unique = 1337878113427 5/24/2012 Vallejo, Calif., once bankrupt, is now a model for cities in an age of austerity - The Washi... Page 1 of 4 i)C1flnqtoi 1305t Back to previous pa.e Se5! hGc;Fi! VW) Can h �'°�,y '..�'E a. { fir EA.1J liu...t�.: k�wa+e. }ua� every ry °o- ;4ir,;.'. w.d ht n FedEx. Solutions That Matter.' , ■ Vallejo, Calif., once bankrupt, is now a model for cities in an age of austerity By Ariana Eunjuug Cha, Published: May 23 VALLEJO, CALIF. — The first couple of years were ugly. After this working -class port city became the largest in America to declare bankruptcy in 2008, crime and prostitution surged as the police force was thinned by 40 percent. Firehouses were shuttered, and funding for libraries and senior centers was slashed. Foreclosures multiplied and home prices plummeted. But then this city of 116,000 began to reinvent itself. It started using technology to fill personnel gaps, rallying residents to volunteer to provide public services and offering local voters the chance to decide how money would be spent — in return for an increase in the sales tax. For the first time in five years, the city expects to have enough money to do such things as fill potholes, clear weeds, trim trees and repair tennis courts. The nation's cities are weak links in the U.S. economy and, if they collapse in large numbers, it could knock the country's recovery off course. Cuts at the federal level are being pushed down to the states, which in turn are passing the problems to their cities. The strains are especially great in California, which was at the epicenter of the housing market meltdown and the deep recession that followed. Even before revenue slowed, the state was facing unique constraints on public finances because its laws make it difficult to raise taxes. The dire conditions, however, have made California a laboratory for how to run cities in an age of http:// www.washingtonpost.com/business /economy /vallej o- calif -once- bankrupt -is- now -a -... 5/24/2012 Vallejo, Calif., once bankrupt, is now a model for cities in an age of austerity - The Washi... Page 2 of 4 austerity. Declaring bankruptcy used to be a last resort for cities, not only because it would cripple their ability to borrow for years to come but because of the blow to their reputation. But that attitude has started to change as more cities have found themselves facing fiscal catastrophe; bankruptcy offers an opportunity to start over with a clean slate. At least three California cities — Stockton, Mammoth Lakes and Montebello — have declared that they are exploring the option. And at least 100 of the state's 482 cities are on track to face a similar predicament by the end of the year, according to Barbara O'Connor, a professor at California State University at Sacramento. Chris McKenzie, executive director of the League of California Cities, said that "no one expected the downturn to last this long," adding: "After years of struggling to keep things together as best they could, cities are getting closer and closer to the edge." Economists warn that a number of large bankruptcies of cities, concentrated over a short period of time, could have a devastating effect on the national economy. Banking analyst Meredith Whitney in 2010 ominously predicted hundreds of billions of dollars in municipal bond defaults. While defaults on that scale haven't happened — and Whitney's critics came out in droves to attest to the health of the municipal bond market — the specter of such a crisis hasn't disappeared. City's cash runs out Vallejo, about 35 miles northeast of San Francisco, became the poster child for the failures of municipal budgeting in 2008 when its cash reserves dwindled to zero and it was unable to pay its bills amid falling property tax revenue and the soaring cost of employee compensation and pensions. During happier times, Vallejo's salaries for city employees had ballooned, with a number of top officials making $200,000 or $300,000. More than 80 percent of the municipal budget went toward compensation. The city's credit rating dropped to junk status, and as part of its bankruptcy settlement, Vallejo paid only five cents for every dollar it owed to bondholders. On the labor side, officials cut workers' pay, health care and other benefits but left pensions intact. For Vallejo to survive, two city council members — Marti Brown, 46, a redevelopment worker for the state, and Stephanie Gomes, 45, a legislative specialist for the U.S. Forest Service — decided that the city needed to study best practices from around the world and bring some of them to California. "We're trying to be more innovative and risk - taking," Brown said. "It's something we've been forced to do, but it's turning out to be a really positive experience for the city." The police went high -tech, investing $500,000 in cameras across the city that allow officers to monitor a larger area than they could before. The department deputized citizens to participate in law enforcement by sharing tips on Facebook and Twitter. Gomes, whose husband is a retired police officer, focused on public safety. The couple went neighborhood to neighborhood setting up e -mail groups and social media accounts so people can, for instance, share pictures of suspicious vehicles and other information. "There have been countless cases http: / /www.washingtonpost. com/business /economy /vallej o- calif -once- bankrupt -is- now -a -... 5/24/2012 Vallejo, Calif., once bankrupt, is now a model for cities in an age of austerity - The Washi... Page 3 of 4 where ordinary people have stopped crimes this way," Gomes said. The number of neighborhood watch groups jumped from 15 to 350. Citizen volunteers came together monthly to paint over graffiti and do other cleanup work. And the city council struck an unusual deal with residents — if they agreed to a one -penny sales tax increase, projected to generate an additional $9.5 million in revenue, they could vote on how the money would be used. The experiment in participatory budgeting, which began in April, is the first in a North American city. The approach was pioneered in Port Alegre, Brazil, as a way to get citizens involved in bridging the large gap between the city's middle -class residents and those living in slums on the outskirts. Individual districts in New York and Chicago are also experimenting with the process, and residents there have expressed interest in spending money on things such as more security cameras and lighting, public murals, and Meals on Wheels for seniors. A statewide shortfall As the 2012 -13 budget season kicks off in California, Vallejo's neighbors are looking at severe cuts, in part because of reduced support from the state. Gov. Jerry Brown (D) this month revealed that California is facing a crushin.g$16 billion deficit because of a shortfall in tax revenue. As a result, the state is diverting billions that had been earmarked for redevelopment or housing assistance away from cities that were already under fiscal stress. Stockton is in eleventh -hour negotiations with creditors to try to avoid bankruptcy. The city of Hercules defaulted on a $2.4 million bond interest payment in February. Vacaville is considering closing City Hall every Friday and forcing employees to take unpaid leave or vacation time. The state capital, Sacramento, which is expecting an $18 million deficit for fiscal 2012 -13, has proposed cutting 286 full -time jobs, including police and firefighters, a move that would probably leave the city unable to respond to home burglaries and car accidents and lengthen the response time for 911 calls in all but the most dire cases. Vallejo is in a markedly different situation. While it still faces some serious challenges crime continues to be a problem, and the housing market remains depressed — the city's finances are doing so well that a federal judge released it from bankruptcy in November. "We're seeing a lot of cities around us that are where we were five years ago," Gomes said. "Some of those cities were laughing at us back then. It's nice to be on the other side of it." While its general -fund budget of $69 million for 2012 -13 is a far cry from the $85 million at its peak in the 1980s, Vallejo is in much better financial shape than many other cities around the country. Assistant City Manager Craig Whittom, who has worked in Vallejo since 2003, said the bankruptcy may have been the best thing to happen: "It was effective at helping us re- create ourselves and change the culture so that we could restart from a stronger financial footing." http: / /www.washingtonpost. com/business /economy /vallej o- calif -once- bankrupt -is- now -a -... 5/24/2012