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03/27/2012 04 Council General Information i .i.,,, ( 0—) -,,,.,,,i, -, v . ,:,,,, 1:,. BUSINESS OF THE CITY COUNCIL YAKIMA, WASHINGTON AGENDA STATEMENT Item No. I For Meeting of: March 27, 2012 ITEM TITLE: Council General Information SUBMITTED BY: CONTACT PERSON /TELEPHONE: SUMMARY EXPLANATION: 1. City Meeting Schedule for Week of March 26, 2012 2. Preliminary Future Activities Calendar as of March 26, 2012 3. 3/22/12 Weekly Issues Report 4. Preliminary Council Agenda 5. 3/19/12 Response from Wastewater Manager Scott Schafer regarding Pollution Complaint at Buchanan Lake 6. 3/19/12 Letter from Colleen Edgeworth regarding City Employee Alvie Maxey 7. 3/9/12/ Memorandum from Wastewater Manager Scott Schafer regarding Water Environment Research Nutrient Project 8. News Release regarding Start of the 2012 Irrigation Season 9. Newspaper /Magazine Articles: * "Key Bank remodels outside of bank, inside next," Yakima Valley Business Journal, March 2012 * "Agriculture contributes $1.2 billion to local economy," Yakima Valley Business Journal, March 2012 Resolution Ordinance Other (specify) Contract: Mail to: Contract Term: Amount: Expiration Date: Insurance Required? No Funding Phone: Source: APPROVED FOR Manager SUBMITTAL: ... / . 17 # 4,. ' . STAFF RECOMMENDATION: CITY MEETING SCHEDULE For March 26, 2012 — April 2, 2012 Please note: Meetings are subject to change Monday, March 26 12:00 p.m. Greenway Board Meeting — Greenway Visitors Center 12:00 p.m. Capitol Theatre Board Meeting — Capitol Theatre Tuesday, March 27 10:00 a.m. City Council Study Session — Council Chambers 1:30 p.m. Yakima County Commissioners Agenda Meeting — Council Chambers Wednesday, March 28 12:00 p.m. Visitors & Convention Bureau Board Meeting — Convention Center 2:00 p.m. Bid Opening — Council Chambers 4:30 p.m. Arts Commission Meeting — CED Conference Room 5:30 p.m. Historic Preservation Commission — Council Chambers Thursday, March 29 11:00 a.m. Bid Opening — Council Chambers Monday, April 2 10:00 a.m. City Council Media Briefing — Council Chambers Office Of Mayor /City Council Preliminary Future Activities Calendar Please Note: Meetings are subject to change `Meeting-' Organization Meeting „Purpose Participants, Meeting. Location x ' Date/Time Mon. Mar. 26 12:00 p m. Greenway Board Meeting Board Meeting Ettl Greenway Visitors Center 1200 p m. Capitol Theatre Board Board Meeting Bristol Capitol Theatre Meetin. Tue. Mar. 27 10:00 a.m Council Study Session with Scheduled Meeting Council Council Chambers Department Directors 12 00 •.m. Miscellaneous Issues Scheduled Meetin• Cawle Adkison TBD _.... p��..hm..�., ...�. Wed. Mar. 28 12 00 p m. YVVCB Board Meeting Board Meeting Adkison Yakima Convention Center Room F 4'30 p.m. Arts Commission Scheduled Meeting Adkison CED Conference Room 5.30 p m Historic Preservation Scheduled Meeting Bristol Council Chambers Commission 40.19304 4110.4740190. Mon. April 2 1000 a m City Council Media Briefing Scheduled Meeting Adkison Council Chambers Tue. April 3 12.00 p m. Miscellaneous Issues Scheduled Meeting Cawley, Adkison TBD 4.30 p.m. City Council Executive Scheduled Meeting Council Council Chambers Session 6.00 •.m. Cit Council Meetin. Scheduled Meetin. Council Council Chambers Wed. April 4 9 a m Joint Gang Commission Scheduled Meeting Adkison YPD Special Ops Training meetin• Room Thur. April 5 � .x •, .,�. • .a.,.m.. ...._,,�._� .�.. 4 p m GFI Steering Committee Scheduled Meeting Adkison, Coffey, CWCMH Meeting Ettl 6 00 p m Regional Fire Authority Scheduled Meeting Cawley, Coffey, Station 86 Adkison Fri. April 6 8 00 a m Sister Cit Meetin• Scheduled Meetin. Adkison CED Conference Room Mon. April 9 8 30 a.m Pension Board Meetings Board Meetin. Coffey,, Conference Room Tue. April 10 ...,�.. �,�.. �x. �...�w.- �.m.. e...�..� ,�.. -...w . 1000 a.m City /County Joint Study Scheduled Meeting Council Council Chambers Session re Airport Ownership 12.00 p.m. Miscellaneous Issues Scheduled Meeting Cawley, Adkison TBD 5:00 p m. Council Executive Session - Scheduled Meeting Council Council Chambers review City Manager a. • licants Wed. April 11 11.30 a.m Sports Commission Scheduled Meeting Ettl TBD 3 30 p m. Yakima Planning Scheduled Meeting Ensey Council Chambers Commission 5 30 p m. Parks Commission Meeting Scheduled Meeting Adkison Council Chambers Thur. April 12 1 00 p m. Harman Center Board Board Meeting Cawley Harman Center Meeting 1 30 p m Yakima Regional Clean Air Scheduled Meeting Lover Council Chambers Meetin. MEMORANDUM March 22, 2012 TO: The Honorable Mayor and City Council Members FROM: Michael A. Morales, Interim City Manager SUBJECT: Weekly Issues Report • COUNCIL STUDY SESSION: The Council will be meeting with Department Directors on Tuesday, March 27 at 10:00 a.m. in the Council Chambers. Department Directors will have a short presentation on each division and how they align with Council's strategic priorities. • FIRE INSPECTIONS: The City Council will be discussing fire inspections at the Council study session on March 27 (approximately 11:45 a.m.). Representatives in the fire suppression profession were invited to the meeting. • NORTH 1 STREET REVITALIZATION: The City of Yakima was awarded a $250,000 STP Grant for engineering and design of the North 1 Street Corridor Revitalization Project. • GRAVEL PILE AT RANDALL PARK: At the 3/20/12 City Council Meeting, Sharon Baze made inquiry into the purpose of the large gravel pile near Randall Park south of Wide Hollow Creek. The gravel was been stockpiled at that location to provide a more proximate location for use in chip sealing arterials and residential streets. Since the Street Division has not been able to fund the chip seal program for 2 years, the pile remains relatively untouched. The Public Works Director and the Streets Manager both discussed this with Ms. Baze after the Council Meeting. • GANG INTERVENTION WORKSHOP: Yakima County Juvenile Court in conjunction with the National Gang Center will be holding a workshop for outreach workers in Yakima County. The instructor will be Victor Gonzales, Director of Prevention and Intervention Services, Mayor's Anti -Gang Office, Houston, Texas. The workshop will be held at PNWU on March 26 from 6 -8.00 p.m. For more information contact Robyn Berndt at 574 -2054 or robyn.berndt @co.yakima.wa.us. • LINCOLN AVENUE UNDERPASS UPDATE: Contractors resumed work on March 19 finishing walls including graffiti treatment and prep work for paving which is expected to begin in about two weeks. Final design and engineering of Front Street alignment is also being completed. PRELIMINARY FUTURE COUNCIL AGENDA April 3 4:30 p.m. Executive Session — Council Chambers • Pending and prospective litigation • Review qualifications of a public official 6:00 p.m. Business Meeting — Council Chambers • Presentation and introduction of artist Lily Yeh • Second reading of ordinance approving 2011 encumbrance appropriations (Epperson) • 2011 year end budget report • Resolution approving special conditions in police chief contract • Resolution revising plumbing code • Resolution authorizing a Professional Services agreement with Huibregtse, Louman Associates for the extension of the City's industrial wastewater collection system in the vicinity of 23 Avenue and River Road • Set date for Public Hearing to amend the Six -year Transportation Improvement Plan 7:00 p.m. Public Hearings 3/21/2012 544 PM 1 City Council Informational Item March 19, 2012 To Honorable Mayor, Members of City Council, and City Manager From: Scott Schafer, Wastewater Division Manager RE: Buchanan Lake — Pollution Complaint The City of Yakima received another email from Mr. Lynn Buchanan on Thursday, March 8 th indicating that the City was once again polluting Buchanan Lake with "dirty water." He goes on to state that it is also occurring in the Sarge Hubbard Lake and provided three photos which appeared to be petroleum -like substance within the water. Since receiving this notice, I have had both our Stormwater and Pretreatment Crews investigating this issue Upon inspecting the City's outfall to Buchanan Lake, a little bit of water and trash with leaves were captured by our screen within the pipe located in Beech St. The pipe was actually dry and not being discharged into Buchanan Lake; even after a recent rain shower A sample of the material residing at the screen was collected, nothing to indicate the pollution in Mr Buchanan's photo It was therefore determined that the City stormwater pipe permitted to drain to Buchanan Lake was dry and not contributing to the pollution complaint. As part of the City's investigation, the City looked into the activities being conducted by Central Pre -Mix for their snow storage Snow was being allowed to melt from dirty piles of gravel and drain directly into the lake Our Pretreatment crew then located just east of where Central Pre -Mix pulls from the lake for their truck wash (pvc piping), an outfall where a petroleum based product in high concentration was being discharged into Buchanan Lake Samples were collected with results to be known by the end of next week. The substance collected appears very similarly to what Mr. Buchanan was referring to in his photos. Smoke - testing indicated that the source of discharge was from the Central Pre -Mix truck wash. The City further investigated the Sarge Hubbard Park area including the lake and the nearby ponds. Nothing was located to indicate polluting from the City's stormwater outfall. These ponds do not connect into Buchanan Lake We reported our findings to the Department of Ecology's 24 -Hour Hotline. As such, the City's investigation into Mr. Buchanan's latest complaint has lead to the finding of a discharge of a petroleum based product from an outfall located on Central Pre -Mix's property originating from their truck shop Central Pre -Mix leases the property from Mr Buchanan and they operate under the coverage of an Industrial Permit "Sand and Gravel General Permit" issued and maintained by the Department of Ecology for discharging of process water, mine dewatering water, and stormwater associated with certain types of mining operations, concrete and asphalt production. There was no indication that any pollution was being contributed by the City's stormwater outfall to Buchanan Lake. We have therefore turned this matter over to the Department of Ecology. The City will also seek reimbursement from the Department of Ecology for the sampling and testing conducted in locating the source of pollution to the waters of the state identified as being Central Pre -Mix. March 19, 2012 Mr, Dave Brown Public Works Department 2301 Fruitvale Boulevard Yakima, WA -98902 RE: Mr. -Alvie-Maxey, irrigation Department Dear Mr, Brown, I am. writing to express gratitude and bestow the highest praise for one of the City's employees,. .Alvie Maxey. Mr. Maxey was contacted by the owner of the property at 12' South 12 Avenue., Daniel' Nadig regarding aproblematic irrigation situation between his property 'and the one directly beside it -on the corner of 12 Avenue South and Terrace-.Street. Both properties had an unusual situation whereby one irrigation line was being' utilized for both properties. The line had to be shut off last Fall, just prior to irrigation service being terminated. for the season, due - to a leak. This created- a challenging and' potentially costly problem for both property owners. Dr. -Nadig contacted Mr. Maxey for assistance with this problem — and Mr. Maxey came through with flying colors for. all parties involved. Dr. Nadig does not live in Yakima; I am the tenant at his property and dealt directly with Mr. Maxey. I was very impressed by his handling of the situation.. He was completely professional, ethical, timely in - his - actions and clear in his communication. He- showed concern for.-all- of-the neighbors involved - in the situation and ensured that everyone was kept informed at all times. His solution(s) to the, problem were. generous,, fair and effective. On 'behalf of the owner property t rent from and the adjoining neighbors, I'd like to extend our appreciation to Mr. Maxey and his crew. Mr. Maxey is definitely an employee to be commended for his.dedication .and .service to. the community and as.an- .outstanding representative of the City of Yakima. Sincerely, Colleen Edgeworth 0 12 South 12 Yakima, WA 98902 cc: Dr. Daniel Nadig - 01 : CITY OF YAKIMA .1' '', , WASTEWATER DIVISION • ; ; 2220 East Viola 's,�Q `.F , r� , ; . , , Yakima, Washington 98901 Phone: 575 -6077 • Fax (509) 575 -6116 - ¢= City Council Informational Item March 19, 2012 To: Honorable Mayor, Members of City Council, and City Manager From: Scott Schafer, Wastewater Division Manager Dean Smith, Wastewater Utility Project Manager RE: Water Environment Research Foundation (WERF) Nutrient Project Nutrient recovery, particularly the recovery of phosphorus via struvite has been studied and reported in scientific literature and is now commercially available at some wastewater treatment facilities. Mechanisms of struvite precipitation are largely understood at both laboratory and full scale levels. Processes for industrial recovery of phosphorus by struvite precipitation have also been available for almost a decade. Much of the work has focused on the wastewater sidestream (e.g., centrate from dewatering processes, anaerobic digester supernatants, etc); however, not as much has been completed and / or published or demonstrated on phosphorous recovery from the mainstream wastewater or from biosolids. In addition, adoption of the technology(ies) by the wastewater industry is somewhat limited. The industry is in need of a thorough analysis of best options and guidance for the selection and implementation of viable technologies and processes for sustainable nutrient recovery. The Water Environment Research Foundation (WERF) is conducting a Nutrient Project that will provide needed research to identify the full range of nutrient extracting processes and how this resource can be commoditized. It will identify areas where new processes might still be developed; evaluate each of these processes for current and future potential; identify paths and barriers for process implementation; and develop a tool allowing subscribers easy access to the information collected and created by this effort so that they can readily decide whether the process of interest has a net value to their agency or company, or not. As such, WERF is welcoming proposals from well - qualified teams of experts to conduct all the necessary tasks required to provide analysis and guidance on nutrient recovery technologies and processes. The work requested here is expected to be completed in two consecutive and distinct phases over a two year period: Phasel: Comprehensive Assessment of Technologies and Market Factors Phase 2: Bench- and/or Field - Studies Yakima Al-Man ilii f 199 The successful team selected by WERF is expected to be comprised of practicing engineers, technologists, water reclamation plants, researchers, and environmental professionals well - positioned to add value to the proposed efforts. Two such teams have contacted the City of Yakima (City) Wastewater Division. The City looks forward to participating in the project and will provide in -kind contribution (talent and resources) to help achieve the project's objectives to the team selected by WERF. There is no additional cost to the City for participating in this Nutrient Study other than a couple of hours per month compiling the data needed by the research team. Letters of commitment to the potential research teams have been enclosed, as well as the Request for Proposal for WERF Nutrient Project. By installing struvite reactors to reduce loading of phosphorus to the Yakima River, the City is using cutting -edge technology in protecting the environment. We feel this is a great opportunity to be recognized for our efforts on both a national and global level through this Nutrient Study. This high profile project will also assist in recognizing the City's efforts in attempting to establish an alternative adaptation plan as it relates to relocating its outfall in response to the Gap to Gap Levy Setback project. City of Yakima Water /Irrigation Division Irrigation Operations Overcoming Today's Challenges for a Greener Tomorrow ATews Rel Subject: Start of 2012 Irrigation Season Contact: Alvie L. Maxey, Irrigation Supervisor — 575 -6194 Release Date Thursday, March 15, 2012 START OF THE 2012 IRRIGATION SEASON YAKIMA, WASHINGTON — Irrigation systems operated by the City of Yakima will begin irrigation delivery April 2, 2012 weather and other conditions permitting. Full delivery of water should be available after 2 weeks from the start date. All other local irrigation suppliers are expected to begin their operations during the balance of April, with all systems operating by May 1, 2012. All water users are encouraged to inspect and secure their irrigation delivery systems for the 2012 Irrigation Season by turning off their faucets and replacing drain plugs as necessary. - end — Yakima Valley Business Journal Vol 22, Issue 3 March, 2012 -:' ey . Aii - Tank remot-is outsti.- ..-- if ,,a• ^,do ?.7 ! : kJ ° "tkv:;Yp.,n;axY: "'' "':(`: ' , ,• , r _ r . ; ,, y � e,a.• 1�+, lTrir a . J374114'4 ' •. : ,',i3 •43r',,-.'�, idyl a LA 3Cr A � 3 + ' I v 1 ,, T 1 • •,, 1 ,� a w' Y AKIMA - KeyBank has completed a dramatic t half its Puget Sound area branches and build - ,, y � "a w Y , ," y p,'�,;� _ ,A, % � facelift of its downtown Yakima branch and is about ing about 20 new ones. Accordin to District Retail lr h t �+1P� Mx �� f �P� � � { u�l� �t t �^ � U i d' O g ,' 5 ,I, i t t 4 ' ' k 1 , � �, i , x �� • t�,� P . �,, to begin an equally robust remodeling project m- Leader John Roehm, Key's expansion and revital- a dle � u yk;�' 0 3 , 1. , • § , A• , y� ,,,,,, r* , i 3 side. ization ro ram reflects the continued importance q �° / \' , 0 , w; " ,,,'' 4 a' "f '. ' t t'':1016,,,, loo,, ` � "' g .y g � � ` '. The exterior work involved resurfacing the of bank branches to consumers and businesses who 2 a q �� h4, a Fr ' i '' `' , , k , • , of 48,189- square -foot, two -story building with a increasingly seek a mix of channels to conduct their kfr Y , c sand - colored stucco outfitting all 34 windows and banking '� s , :` t o r ;� + . ��i I� " 1 1 ',,` 4 entrances with energy - efficient double paned re- The first phase of the downtown Yakima branch z L r €.: 7; ax,� ;, , n t rr r x' `•r `� , v =/ placements, rebuilding the surrounding sidewalks, remodeling project is getting high marks from the xe , ' • i r ,r ; 4 ,, ix ,', '' , } ,, , , 'A ^ .0" installing new outdoor lighting, adding new signage community. ,Fi '' ' `' "`...= ` ' ' . 0 - 4 ' and finishing the look with Key's signature red can- " KeyBank's renovation perfectly complements ' u '..''A,. > - vas awnings. the work that's been done to revitalize downtown When the dust settles this fall, the exterior and over the past eight years," said Matt Klaus, opera- "' k s interior renovations will have taken about. two years tions manager for the Yakima Downtown Business ,., - v ;i t '�� f f y ? ` ' ,� � , k `t 5 � . Improvement District. "It's a great example of what to complete. : 7 t 5 r } , ,i, ' s s' > ti x` 4'1n +M i JS�d . Ha 4 t 3. y w, £ , i �- .' )'+ S » ''''.';'''''''...t ��� � s �, „ �,�,� z � M .. ,�. � _ , .2''' , t , � � The branch at 102 E. Yakima Avenue commands our businesses can do. On behalf of the City of Photo by Kori Koch a highly visible spot at the intersection of down- Yakima, the Business Improvement District has Before renovation: KeyBank's downtown Yakima branch and office town's two major arterials. In many ways, it serves enhanced the downtown environment by installing building, built in 1904, as it looked before exterior renovations as a. gateway to downtown. new streetscapes, banner and light poles, trash cans, began last year. "When we looked at the visibility and conve- sidewalks and seasonal hanging floral baskets. , t` nience of this superlative location," said KeyBank KeyBank Branch Manager Jim Herriman and H , Seattle - Cascades President Rick Wirthlin, "we con- Yakima -based Area Retail Leader Michelle An- 2, l { i` t,, eluded that a major renovation was the right thing drews are eager to host a customer appreciation M ° to do." event in the fall to mark completion of work. "Our £ .k ', �� ; T Ins work is expected to begin by late April clients are enduring some inconvenience during - u 'y.. ..3, 1� 4 dt y t ii� . , - j , "'-... , ,, * -z, o • . r and wind down in August. In the branch, that means our remodeling efforts," said Herriman, and we F, f Y F , R ,, ,, 1 cx t 6 I ? j lowering the ceiling, installing energy efficient light- want to thank them for their patience and loyalty to a h r v °' ,RS � . , ij , ing, and redecorating with new carpeting, paint, and Key." Meanwhile, they invite area residents to join , �, x� 'x`�`, �• " ' .r_ 1r 1 ` , i i t floor tile. The teller line will be outfitted with under- in celebrating the bank's new curb appeal "while i I. 1 ' 4 1 , counter cabinets and laminated with a signature red we work on making their banking experience more 4:3'1 r front panel. Two flat - screen televisions will be wall- convenient and comfortable inside." mounted behind the teller line to present helpful'in- The 1904 vintage building houses 29 KeyBank formation for clients. Upstairs offices will receive a employees, 10 who work in the branch and 19 whose P h o t o by Kori Koch , new ceiling, lighting, carpet,.and•paint. second floor offices comprise Key's agribusiness After renovation: KeyBank's downtown Yakima branch and office The Yakima remodel is one of 22 that KeyBank headquarters in Washington. building now sport a new tan stucco finish, updated signage, rebuilt sidewalks, energy - efficient double -paned windows and signature b egan last year throughout ,its‘ Seattle- Cascades red canvas awnings. District. From °2009 to 2012,' Key is updating more see KEY BANK page 12 KEy BANK continued from page 1 Three Yakima contractors Theatre, and Yakima County De- One of the nation's largest bank - were instrumental in coniplet- velopment Association, among based financial services compa- ing the KeyBank branch exte- others. Last year; Key's $125,000 rues, Key has assets of approxi- rior renovation, including Metal grant to Junior Achievement mately $89 billion at December Benders Inc., ..Central Valley helped build Yakima's new JA 31, 2011. Glass; and Eagle Sign Company. World where nearly 12,500 stu- Key provides deposit, lend - The renovation was super- dents from throughout Central ing, cash management. and in- vised by KeyBank Real: Estate and Eastern Washington are ex- vestment services to individuals Solutions. Facility ManagerMi- pected - !to benefit from JA pro- and small businesses in 14- states chael Hackel. gramming every year. under the name KeyBank Nation - While improving the aesthet- About, KeyBank's Seattle- al Association. Key also provides ics` of downtown Yakima is Its Cascades - a broad range of sophisticated latest endeavor, Key has long KeyBank ; operates ' 165 corporate and investment bank - been supporting the community branches in Washington, and '95 ing products, such as merger and by contributing money as well from the Seattle - Tacoma Airport, acquisition advice, public and as volunteer and leadership time north to ' Canada and east to Spo- private debt and equity, syndica- to :area. nonprofits. Current ben- kane. - ' - tions and derivatives to middle eficiaries include United Way of Key traces its back market companies in selected Yakima County, Children's Vil- more`tt an 160 -years andk is head- industries throughout the United lage, Yakima Symphony, Capital 'quar`tered. in ClevelandOhio: States under the KeyBanc Capital Markets trade name. - For more information, visit https: / /www.key.com/. KeyBank is Member FDIC. Yakima Valley Business Journal Vol 22, Issue 3 March, 2012 ,r te ; a ,; ut; !d, is dp � aVig q s 171601 5 %F7, d krt�a'7i ,r' r r ISM '' i .' s, MV '7 c d "%' ,'d' 1, FA8„ r x ° f �l lit N,,,, i �"r�" t„� N! i ' l�� F9�;- �n a7� m ,� ��11��tc,�" �,,, � ,' �K° ''ar. a`?�n� 'r"r,,,�v , �"m7�° ud:.. aeR m;s�,� • Ag r c u l�tu re co ntri Mutes .4 1.2 b i l_I i on to .local eco n o Here at the Extension office water supplies (through irrigation) County in Washington based on Granny Smith, Golden Delicious, one producer of melon in the State in Yakima County, we frequently can produce. The better question market value of crop and.livestock Red Delicious 'and 'Honeycrisp as including watermelon, cantaloupe get calls from landowners asking may be when you grow them, products. Agriculture contributes well as hundreds of antique apple and muskmelon. There is a grow - what they can do with acreage or where 'will you sell their? a.whopping $1_2 billion. to our to varieties. ing berry industry that includes what crops they can grow on their Yakima County , contains one ° = economy: -:: _ ,,. Yakima County is also the blueberries and raspberries that are land to earn a little extra income. of Washington State's `most di Yakima -County is�the leadnng leading county in the nation in on display in local farmers markets This leads to a seemingly endless verse agricultural ciopnmg..''sys= , .county,in -tbe. nation in apple pro- the production of hops. There are and contribute to a fruit juice en- list of crops, pasture and livestock terns. In fact ; ., according to= the'US:,.;' duction with ,, over' 55,000' acres of nearly19,000 acres of hops plant- dustry that ships worldwide. Our that our fertile soils, long growing Department .of _Agriculture's,2007 ' apple orchards producing premier ed on 19 foot-high trellis systems. County also has over 19,000 acres season, dry climate, yet adequate Census, Yakima County is.'the. #1 . varieties like Gala, Fuji, Hops are the essential ingredient of grapes including juice grapes - in the world - renown brews of the like Concord. Premier grape va- PaeificNorthwest :. rieties like Merlot, Cabernet Sau- Within the State :of Washing- vignon, Cabernet Franc, Riesling ton, Yakima County is the number and Chardonnay are grown here <!one'.;producer of sweet cherries to feed a growing wine industry (2,500 { acres), plums /prunes ( >400 that has earned the Yakima Val- - acres), ; nectarines ( >600 acres), ley the designation as one of the peaches ,( >1,000 acres), and of American Viticultural acres found pears (8,400 acres). Iri your tray- in Washington. The Yakima Val- ets through our County, you may ley is home to the State's highest also come across apricots, tart concentration of wineries. cherries, pluots (plums crossed Don't forget your vegetables! with .apricots) and even pecotums Yakima County is the leading pro - (peach X apricot X plums). ducer of squash (summer and win - Yakima County is #1 in the ter) and peppers (bell and chile) state in dairy, milk production, in Washington and has over 3,600 cheese production, cattle and acres of sweet corn. From May calves, sheep and lamb produc- to September, roadside vegetable tion, meat goats. The animal ag- stands are loaded with asparagus, ricultural annual gate value is at onions, snap beans, cucumbers and $600 million. Irrigated pasture to- tomatoes. Sometimes you may tals 140,000 acres, managed range find crops like sweet potatoes, pea - totals 2.2 million acres and ap- nuts or okra where producers rely proximately 40,000 people in the on greenhouse plantings to extend county own from 2 to 20 acres. the growing season for crops nor - Yakima County is the number malty found further South.