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02/07/2012 09 After-Action Report on January 2012 Snow Event ( a (4 .,,, , I° 41 BUSINESS OF THE CITY COUNCIL YAKIMA, WASHINGTON AGENDA STATEMENT Item No. For Meeting of: February 7, 2012 ITEM TITLE: After- action Report on January 2012 Snow Event SUBMITTED BY: Chris Waarvick, Director of Public Works Joe Rosenlund, PE, Streets & Traffic Operations Manager CONTACT Joe Rosenlund, PE, Streets & Traffic Operations Manager, 575 -6005 PERSON /TELEPHONE: SUMMARY EXPLANATION: This report summarizes the six -day snow removal effort that began on January 18. Staff followed the City's adopted Snow Plan that provides general guidance and allows for adapting to changing conditions. It was initially created as a result of the 1996 -97 snow event and has been revised to reflect improved approaches and technology at various times since This includes 16 -hour shifts for employees, the use of private contractors for residential streets, and thresholds for plowing (3" for arterials and 6" for residential). The City resources utilized for this effort included 21 street crewmembers, 17 plow trucks, 2 graders, a loader, a backhoe and a mobile conveyor. The City uses various products including Ice Slicer (de -icing salt), liquid calcium chloride and maintenance rock. The Street Division received support in the form of personnel and equipment from the Water & Irrigation Department, the Wastewater Division and the Vehicle Maintenance Shop. Those personnel assisted contractors clearing neighborhood streets allowing Streets personnel to stay focused on arterial roads. Contractors are approved through an RFQ ( #11129P) through the City's Purchasing Division, ensuring proper insurance, pricing, equipment and other necessary contract components. The general costs of this snow event can be outlined as follows: Materials $103,000 Overtime $ 42,000 Other Divisions $ 20,000 Contractors $250,000 Total $415,000 The 2012 Street Budget's total resources for snow removal is approximately $400,000. Additional appropriation authority will likely by needed but that depends on how the rest of the season proceeds and the November /December snow season is still ahead. We have responded to the nearly 200 calls we received and answered their many questions. Numerous news outlet inquires were also responded to. The calls and emails we received from the public can be categorized in three ways: complaints, compliments and inquiries. Most were in the inquiry category, asking when our crews would be in a given area, as people were having difficulty navigating side streets and hill areas. The complaints were generally along the same subject lines as the inquiries but voiced less politely. Most of the inquiries and complaints came during the earlier half of the operation. Overall, we received about as many compliments as complaints. People were especially appreciative of the crews clearing driveways on residential streets after the contractor had plowed the road. Resolution Ordinance Other (specify) Report Contract: Mail to: Contract Term: Amount: Expiration Date: Insurance Required? No Funding Source: Phone: APPROVED FOR SUBMITTAL: City Manager STAFF RECOMMENDATION: Accept Report. BOARD /COMMISSION RECOMMENDATION: No action needed. ATTACHMENTS: Click to download ❑ Snow and Ice Control Plan ❑ Route Map ❑ Snow Areas Zone Map City of Yakima, Washington SNOW AND ICE CONTROL PLAN Procedures and Guidelines Updated for winter 2010 - 2011 Snow and Ice Control Plan Contents PLAN SUMMARY 1 OPERATIONAL RESPONSE PROCEDURES 2 SNOW AND ICE CONTROL MAINTENANCE GUIDELINES 4 A. INTRODUCTION 4 B. SNOW AND ICE CONTROL POLICY 4 C. STORM CLASSIFICATIONS: 6 1. SNOWSTORM CLASSIFICATION 6 2. ICE STORMS CLASSIFICATION 7 D. IMPLEMENTATION PROCEDURES: 7 1. WEATHER /STORM DECISION 7 2. PERSONNEL NOTIFICATION /RECALL 7 E. SNOW ROUTES AREAS PRIORITIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES 7 1. CITY PERSONNEL 8 2. CONTRACT RESOURCES 8 F. SNOW /ICE CONTROL POLICIES AND PROCEDURES* 8 1. ANTI -ICER AND ABRASIVE GUIDELINES 8 2. SNOW PLOWING GUIDELINES 9 3. MEDIA INTERFACE 9 4. ACCIDENTS 10 G. MANPOWER AND EQUIPMENT ASSIGNMENTS* 10 H. SAFETY PROCEDURES: 11 I. PRE - WINTER SEASON PREPARATION: 12 J. POST OPERATIONS PROCEDURES. 12 ii PLAN SUMMARY The City of Yakima Snow and Ice Control Plan provides information regarding snow removal procedures and policies for the citizens of Yakima, serves as an operational guide to employees, and meets the requirements of an Emergency Incident Plan for Federal Emergency Management Agency guidelines (FEMA). Implementation of this plan during storm events is closely coordinated with emergency response from Yakima Fire Department, Yakima Police Department and other Emergency Service Providers. The plan provides flexibility and policies that will allow the snow and ice control measures for public streets to be addressed quickly and efficiently, while providing the best service possible to the citizens and businesses in Yakima. The Snow and Ice Control Plan is designed to organize a reasonable and cost effective maintenance effort during periods of snow or sleet. The city's streets are divided into three categories: First Priority (Principal and Minor Arterial streets that provide the majority of access for our emergency services personnel, bus routes, hospitals and school routes); Second Priority (Collector Arterial streets and commercial area in the core district of Yakima); and Third Priority (residential streets). Financial constraints of the Plan does not allow a "bare pavement" standard. The City of Yakima will conduct snow and ice control activities that provide citizens a reasonably safe and passable street surface as much of the time as possible within the constraints of equipment, material and staffing. The primary purpose of the Snow and lee Control Plan is to organize the City's resources to provide as safe a travel way as possible during snow and ice events. Some inconvenience may be caused to citizens as snow is moved out of the streets. In certain areas, snow may be plowed to sidewalks or driveways. Both public and private operators will make best effort to minimize the impact, however, snow depth and storm accumulations may hamper operations, This Plan is not mandatory; it is flexible and discretionary, These guidelines set forth to provide general information, operational procedures, and a resource management plan. No part shall constitute a standard or regulation. City crews put forth maximum effort during snow and ice storms. However, prolonged storms, equipment breakdowns, supply availability, abrupt weather changes, and personnel availability impact snow and ice control efforts. These issues must be dealt with on an individual basis during each storm. With over three hundred and fifty miles of streets and over eight hundred and twenty lane miles within the City of Yakima, a great deal of cooperation between Purchasing, Public Works, Police, Utilities, vendors, private contractors and very importantly, the citizens of the city, is required in order to make the City of Yakima's Snow and Ice Control Plan effective. 1 CITY OF YAKIMA WASHINGTON SNOWAND ICE CONTROL PLAN OPERATIONAL RESPONSE PROCEDURES The City of Yakima's objective is to provide a transportation system that is passable and reasonably safe, as much of the time as possible, within the limitations imposed by the natural environment and the availability of equipment, material, and personnel resources. Because of those limitations, there will be occasions when the pavement, bridges, and over or underpasses will be slippery and covered with snow and /or ice. During these periods, drivers must recognize the conditions and operate their vehicles in an appropriately safe manor. The Snow and Ice Control Plan contains information and guidance for the City of Yakima's. Public Works Department in conducting snow and ice operations. It serves as a basis for training City of Yakima personnel in winter operations. The Plan contains information on pre- winter procedures and readiness, storm management, and decision - making using the Incident Command System as contained in the National Incident Management System. This is in response to Presidential Directives issued regarding Homeland Security. It requires that local governments develop and follow a template established by the National Incident Management System to provide a consistent framework for incident management at all jurisdictional levels regardless of the cause, size, or complexity of the incident. Building upon the Incident Command System, the National Incident Management System provides the Nation's first responders and authorities with the same foundation for incident management for terrorist attacks, natural disasters, and other emergencies. The National Incident Management System requires that the Incident Command System be institutionalized. The Incident Action Planning Process includes the following steps: 1. Understand agency policy and direction. 2. Assess incident situation. 3. Establish incident objectives. 4. Select appropriate strategy or strategies to achieve objectives. 5. Perform tactical direction (applying tactics appropriate to the strategy assigning the right resources, and monitoring their performance). 6. Provide necessary follow -up (changing strategy or tactics, adding or subtracting resources, etc.). In Incident Command Systems, emphasis is placed on developing effective Incident Action Plans (IAP). An IAP contains general objectives reflecting the overall strategy for managing an incident. In this Plan, the particular incident is snow and ice events. An IAP includes the (identification of operational resources and assignments and may 2 include attachments that provide additional direction. The purpose of the IAP is to provide all incident supervisory personnel with direction for actions to be implemented during the operational time identified in the plan. The IAP includes measurable strategic operations to be achieved and is prepared around a timeframe called an Operations Period. Incident Action Plans provide a coherent means of communicating the overall incident objective in the context of both operational and support activities. All Incident Action Plans must have the following four elements: 1. What do we want to do? 2. Who is responsible for doing it? 3. How do we communicate with each other? 4. What is the procedure if someone is injured? Span of Control is a basic feature of all Incident Command Systems and,concerns the supervisory structure of the organization. Maintaining an effective span of control is particularly important on incidents where safety and accountability are a top priority. Effective span of control may vary from three to seven, and a ratio of one supervisor to five reporting elements is recommended. • 3 SNOW AND ICE CONTROL MAINTENANCE GUIDELINES A. INTRODUCTION: 1. The purpose of the Snow and Ice Control Operation Plan is to provide all personnel who are involved in snow and ice removal with a single source document that clearly defines the City of Yakima's policies and procedures in all snow and ice operations. All snow and ice operations are considered emergency in nature due to public safety and economic impact to the community. Consequently, regardless of the time of day or week, snow and ice operations will be accomplished as expeditiously as possible in conjunction with the priorities outlined in this Plan. 2. The snow and ice season in Yakima can begin as early as October and terminates as late as mid — March. Atmosphere temperatures, pavement temperatures, moisture content, wind direction and velocity, and intervals between storms affect the rate of accumulation of snowfall or icing. Each storm is unique, therefore, while this Plan tries to cover the major operations during a snow or ice storm, it must be recognized that there must be sufficient flexibility within the plan to provide for differences or contingencies as they occur. 3. This Plan supersedes all other plans and policies previously published by the City of Yakima for snow and ice control. B. SNOW AND ICE CONTROL POLICY 1. The policy of the City of Yakima is to control snow and ice in the following priority: Principal Arterials Minor Arterials Public Safety Facilities /Hospitals Schools Other Collector Arterials Not Already Addressed Central Business District Local Access Streets Removal and deicing will be conducted as expeditiously as possible during and after the storm, and will be achieved through a combination as necessary and by policy, of mechanical (plowing) and chemical means (salt/calcium chloride) or traction material applied in some cases, de -icing material can be applied in advance of a storm event. The City does not have a bare pavement policy. 4 2. Snow and ice control operations of all city streets will be prioritized based on what is of immediate need for public safety. A map of Snow Priority Routes is included in this Plan (see Appendix). Priorities of service for snow and ice control operations arc as follows: ❖ Priority 1 - All Principal Arterial streets will be given the fist priority for snow and ice control during and after the storm event. Concurrently, with the Principal Arterials and as resources become available, city personnel will perform snow and ice control measures on Minor Arterials, and access to public safety facilities and hospitals. Streets adjacent to schools will be addressed following these areas. ❖ Priority 2 - Collector Arterials not already addressed will be the next priority. Plowing and snow removal operations at the conclusion of the storm will.shift to the downtown (Central Business District) if snow accumulations exceed three inches. •. Priority 3 - Local access streets will be plowed snow if the accumulation exceeds six inches, possibly by contract personnel. The Director of Public Works will make the determination of when this operation will begin. Temperature forecasts will also be taken into • consideration prior to a decision being made by the Director. If an ice storm occurs, city personnel will treat local access streets with salt and /or a salt/sand mix. Alleys will not be plowed, sanded, Or receive de- icing measure unless verified emergency requirements so, dictate that a selected alley may be treated. 3. Snow will` be plowed in a manner that minimizes traffic obstructions. Snow will normally be plowed from the center of the street to the shoulder except in the CBD where snow ids plowed to the center of the road. 4. City personnerwill not clear plowed -in driveways; this is the citizens' responsibility. Those citizens who are unable to clear the snow from their driveway may request assistance through ? ? ?. These requests will be addressed . at the conclusion of a storm- event. Plowing of snow may result in snow being plowed into driveways and on sidewalks. Shoveling of snow back into the street right -of -way will result in snow being plowed back into " driveways and onto sidewalks. 5. Citizens are required by Yakima Municipal Code 8.88 to clear snow or apply abrasives and /or de -icers to sidewalks adjacent to their property. Complaints regarding snow on sidewalks are to be rep orted to the Yakima Police Department for enforcement. . 6. In the event that the storm's severity and intensity is such as t� cause unsafe conditions for city personnel clearing and /or de -icing streets, operations will cease pending acceptable weather conditions that do not pose a severe threat to snow and ice control personnel. 7. Snowplow damage that may occur to private property should be reported to the City Clerk's office as soon as possible at 509 - 575 -6037. 5 C. STORM CLASSIFICATIONS: Each snow or ice storm will be unique and vary in intensity, duration, and total precipitation. This section will attempt to apply a basic classification system to assist in establishment of priorities of equipment, material, and labor for a generic management system for implementation in snow and ice control operations. The storm classification system will utilize the estimated total expected snowfall and total ice glazing for storms. 1. SNOWSTORM CLASSIFICATION Class A Storms are defined as storms of extremely heavy snowfall of ten inches or more occurring in a period of twenty -four hours or Tess and will be declared a "Snow Emergency" by the City Manager or a designee. Snow Priority Routes will receive primary concentration (see Snow Priority Routes Map, Appendix). Back -up support from other city divisions will be necessary. Contractor services will. be called as plow efforts begin. An additional fifteen to twenty snow plow units, six to ten additional trucks to remove snow, and three to five front -end loaders would be necessary to assist with snow removal and plowing. This type of storm may cause life- threatening conditions to occur. When weather forecasts indicate that a Class A storm is imminent, Public Work's response will immediately be activated by the direction of the Director of Public Works. All City assets will be placed on notice awaiting mobilization as required. City Manager, Assistant City Manager, Fire and Police Chiefs will be notified. Class B Storms are defined as storms with six to ten inches of snow accumulation. Back-up support from other city divisions will be necessary. Contractor services will be called as plow efforts begin. An additional twelve to fifteen plow units, six trucks to remove snow, and one to three front -end loaders would be necessary to assist with snow removal and plowing. This type of storm can pose the same threats to public safety as a Class A, but its intensity will allow the City to keep the snow emergency routes open during the storm. A Class B storm will normally not require the declaration of a snow emergency,, however, as the storm progresses it could be upgraded to a Class A, which would necessitate the declaration of emergency. The response will be activated in the same fashion as with the Class A storm. City Manager, Assistant City Manager, Fire and Police Chiefs will be notified. Class C Storms are defined as storms with three to six inches of snow accumulation. Back -up support from other divisions will be required after the first twenty -four hours of plowing arterial streets. No contract service assistance is expected. 6 Class D Storms are defined as storms with one to three inches of snow accumulation. Street and Traffic Operations personnel will address this size of storm. Back -up support from other divisions will not normally be required and no contract service assistance is expected. 2. ICE STORMS CLASSIFICATION All ice storms will be rated as a Class A Storms. Ice storms will cause immediate threats to the public safety. If an ice storm is imminent or occurs, the Director of Public Works will immediately activate the City's response. D. IMPLEMENTATION PROCEDURES: 11. WEATHER /STORM DECISION a. During normal duty and non -duty hours, key personnel (Street and Traffic Operations Manager and Street Maintenance Supervisor) involved in snow and ice control will monitor forecasted storms using NOAA Weather Service. If a Class A or B Storm is predicted the Director of Public Works or the Street and Traffic Operations Manager will activate the snow response. For Class C or D Storms, no formal activation is necessary. 2. PERSONNEL NOTIFICATION /RECALL a. It is imperative that each division within the Public Works Department and other City departments maintain a current and validated recall roster during the snow and ice season. Every City employee is eligible to be assigned snow and ice control duties by the City Manager dependent on the storm conditions. Quick and proactive response is the key to the successful implementation of this Plan. Consequently, Water /Irrigation Wastewater and the Park Divisions will prepare, no later than the first working day of November each year, a division recall roster. This roster will be available to the Street Division Manager and Operation Supervisor. The divisions will maintain an updated roster. b. Upon activation of a Class A or B storm, the recall roster for Street and Traffic Operations, Parks, Water /Irrigation, and Wastewater will be activated as required. E. SNOW ROUTES AREAS PRIORITIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES: 7 1. CITY PERSONNEL The priorities for snow and ice control of public streets by City resources (labor and equipment) will be in the following priorities and shown on the Snow Priority Route Map in the Appendix of this report. Priorities may be adjusted due to specific storm conditions. Priority 1: Principal and Minor Arterials, Public Safety Facilities, Emergency Medical Services Priority 2: Collector Arterials, hills, signalized intersections, schools, and Central Business District Management Areas are shown on the Snow Control Area Map in the Appendix of this report. These management areas divide the City streets in to 12 districts that will be used for allocating labor and equipment. 2. CONTRACT RESOURCES The Department of Public Works will contract on an annual basis with local contractors for snow and ice control augmentation for the city. Contractor personnel will normally be assigned to work on local access streets, City parking lots and assist with post storm removal of snow from the Central Business District. Contract personnel and equipment may be used at other location if necessary. Contract personnel will be incorporated into this Plan in amendment format. This amendment will be updated annually. Each contractor will be given a copy of the performance measures and their area of responsibility as they are called in to work. The priorities for snow and ice control by private contracted operators and their equipment will be in the following priorities. Priorities may be adjusted due to specific storm conditions. Contract Priority 1: Assist with snow removal, when deemed necessary, in the Central Business District Contract Priority 2: Provide snow plowing on local access streets in accordance with depth accumulation as set forth in this document. F. SNOW /ICE CONTROL POLICIES AND PROCEDURES: 1. ANTI -ICER AND ABRASIVE GUIDELINES 8 The primary chemicals used by the City of Yakima will be granular de- icing material and liquid calcium chloride. The purpose of these chemicals is to function as anti -icing agent for street surfaces. Liquid calcium chloride will be placed on streets shown on Priority 1 streets prior to a storm occurrence. Both granular material and liquid de -icer will be applied as recommended by the manufacturer. The primary abrasive to be used by the City of Yakima will be 5/16 inch crushed rock. Abrasive application is usually applied to critical safety locations such as hills, intersections with stop signs, bridges and signalized intersections. 2. SNOW PLOWING GUIDELINES All operators will operate snow /ice control equipment in a safe manner. Speeds will be kept to a safe minimum during spreading and plowing operations. Operators are required to stop at red lights and stop signs. Operators are to plow from the street centerline to the right street curb or shoulder unless directed otherwise. This includes tandem - plowing operations; at no time will an operator cross the centerline into the lane of oncoming traffic. Operators are to ensure that their assigned vehicle and plow is fully operational, including emergency lighting, before beginning plowing operations. Each operator will be assigned to a task force (crew) and will report directly to the leader assigned. Any deficiencies are to be reported immediately to their crew leader. Operators will take all appropriate breaks as required during their shift. Breaks are to be reported to their crew leader. The crew leader will schedule meal times. Crew leaders will report equipment issues, individual operator breaks and meal times to the operations supervisor. Authority to exceed twelve hours in at shift will be determined by the Director. Operators and snow personnel will wear appropriate winter clothing to ensure no cold weather injuries are received. 3. MEDIA INTERFACE a. It is important that the public be informed on a regular basis during Class A or B storms of the City's efforts both successful and limitations in all aspects of snow and ice control operations. b. All media releases will be made either by the Director of Public Works or by the Community Relations Manager. Prior to any release, concurrence and approval of the media up -date will be obtained from the Assistant City Manager. 9 4. ACCIDENTS All accidents involving city vehicles will be reported immediately to crew leaders and the Street Maintenance Supervisor. Accidents are to be handled as follows: a. Vehicular Damage - An accident report will be filled out at the scene of the incident, in addition to notifying crew leaders and the Street Maintenance Supervisor. Standard City procedures and forms will be used. Additionally, a law enforcement official will be contacted and a determination made by the officer or supervisor as to whether the city vehicle involved can continue with snow /ice control operations. b. Operator Observed Private Property Damage (mailboxes, fences, etc) - If an operator observes the damage of private property, they will immediately report this type of damage to their crew leader and the Street Maintenance Supervisor. The report will include time of incident, address and description of damage. At the end of the operator's shift, the operator will complete an incident report and give it to the crew leader or Street Maintenance Supervisor. The crew leader or Street Supervisor will inspect and photograph the damage if possible. The Street Supervisor will attempt to contact the owner of the damaged property and inform them how to file a claim with the City if they should so choose. c. Citizen Observed Private Property Damage - In the event the operator does not observe damage and the damage is reported by a citizen, all complaints of damage will be recorded and investigated to substantiate the claim. Any damage resulting form snow and ice control operations to private property will be directed to the City Clerk's office in order to file a claim. All such occurrences will be photographically documented and an incident report completed. G. MANPOWER AND EQUIPMENT ASSIGNMENTS: 1. During a Class A or D storm the Street and Traffic Operations Divisions will immediately commence a two (2) shift operation: each shift will be sixteen (16) hours in duration. The goal is to have each shift overlap at least eight hours in each 24 -hour period. 2. Shift times will vary dependent on time of storm prediction. Every attempt will be made to balance shift overtime hours equally among snow /ice control operators. 3. The Street Operations Division will be the primary labor and equipment resource for all snow and ice control operations. However, during 10 sustained snow and ice control operations, the Parks, Water /Irrigation and Wastewater Divisions can be tasked by the City Manager or Assistant City Manager to provide both labor and equipment resources to support the Street Operations Division in snow and ice control operations. Consequently, the mangers of all divisions noted above will provide a listing of equipment operators and equipment available to assist with snow and ice control operations. This listing will be provided no later than first working day of November of each year. 4. An operator may be on duty a maximum of sixteen hours. After that, the operator must be off duty for a minimum of eight continuous hours before returning to work. Qualified operators from the Street and Traffic Operations Division will be used first. When storm size and /or duration warrants an increase from Level C to Level B or above, the Incident Commander (supervisor) will call in additional resources following the procedure contained in this Plan. Operators are required to report for duty within sixty minutes of notification. It is imperative that each division within the Public Works Department and other city departments maintain a current and validated call -in roster during the snow and ice season. Every city employee is eligible to be assigned snow and ice control duties by the City Manager dependent on storm conditions. Quick and proactive response is the key to successful implementation. Consequently, the Water /Irrigation, Wastewater, and Parks Divisions will prepare, no later than the first working day of November each year, a division call -in roster, This roster will include operator capabilities, licenses, and a twenty -four hour contact number. H. SAFETY PROCEDURES: 1. All operators will operate snow /ice control equipment in a safe manner. Speeds will he kept to a safe minimum sufficient to plow and windrow snow to the shoulder. Operators will not plow at excessive speed causing snow to "fly" at a high speed and distance from the shoulder. 2. Operators will not run red lights or stop signs at intersections. 3. Operators will plow from the street centerline to the right street shoulder unless otherwise directed. This includes tandem plotting; at no time will a plow cross the centerline into the lane of oncoming traffic. 4. Operators will ensure their assigned vehicle and plow is fully operational to include emergency vehicle lighting. Any deficiencies will be reported immediately to the crew leader or the Street Maintenance Supervisor. 5. Operators on twelve -hour shifts will take appropriate breaks as required during their shift. Breaks will be reported to crew leaders. 6. The Street Maintenance Supervisor will schedule meal times. 11 7. Authority to exceed twelve hours in a shift will be determined by the Director. 8. If the intensity of a storm is such as to cause the danger to snow and ice control operators, operations will be terminated pending weather improvement. 9. Operators and snow personnel will wear appropriate winter clothing to ensure cold weather injuries are not received. I. PRE - WINTER SEASON PREPARATION: Commencing in October and continuing through the fall and winter season the Supervisor will schedule recurring training that will focus on snow and ice control issues, including cold weather risks to operators. Training materials will be used to the maximum extent practical. The following tasks are to be included in pre- winter preparations: 1. Division personnel will hold a meeting to discuss known strengths and weaknesses in preparation for the snow and ice season. The Street Maintenance Supervisor or a crew leader will conduct these meetings. 2. "Dry runs" will be conducted by all operators prior to mid - November to ensure all are familiar with the areas and routes. 3. New operators will be assigned to an experienced operator (mentor) to receive training. New operators will receive this training in pre- season and during actual snow and ice operations. The mentor will advise the Street Maintenance Supervisor as to when the individual is ready for solo operation. 4. Commencing in October the Fleet Division will prepare and ensure all snow and ice control equipment is prepared and operational for mounting on appropriated equipment. 5. The crew leaders will calibrate and certify all salt/sand spreaders to ensure maximum efficiency. The Street Maintenance Supervisor Certification will maintain a file of equipment certifications. 6. Salt and sand spreaders will be mounted onto appropriate trucks after the end of the annual Street Maintenance Program. J. POST OPERATIONS PROCEDURES: 1. During Storm: At each shift change the "oncoming" shift crew leader will report one half hour prior to shift change for a briefing on the current operational activities. The "outgoing" operators will perform the required maintenance and services of their assigned equipment prior to relief from shift. These include but are not limited to the following: Fuel top -off Fluid checks 12 Windshield washer fluid replacement Tire pressure Fill spreader with material being used, to include calcium chloride Check plow edges Check windshield wipers Check emergency lighting Crew leaders will certify that all equipment operated during their shift has had a post shift service completed. 2. After Storm Equipment Procedures: All equipment will receive a thorough inspection to all operator- required services. Spreaders will be lubricated. All known maintenance deficiencies will be reported to the Street Maintenance Supervisor to coordinate immediate correction by the Fleet Division. 3. Post Storm Briefing: Within 2 to 4 days of a winter storm that requires snow and ice control, a crew leader meeting will be conducted by the Street Maintenance Supervisor. The Street and Traffic Operations Manager may be present. The purpose of the briefing will be to allow discussion of any issues or problems that occurred during the incident and potential solutions to improve operation delivery. The discussion will include the following items: a. Weather forecast - Was it accurate related to wind, accumulation, temperature? Did it help in planning for the event? b. Response Timeliness - Did operations occur in a timely manner'? c. Staffing - Was staff adequate and available? Are any improvements needed to call out procedures? d. Materials Used - A report should be compiled to document the amount of materials used in the event. e. Application Rates — Were the application rates appropriate for the road conditions? f. Material Handling Issues - Any problems reported in equipment handling, loading, spreading or storage of materials? g. Equipment Problems - Any problems experienced in the equipment used for service operation and delivery? h. Preventative Maintenance - Any suggestions for additional preventative maintenance that would have eliminated equipment problems? Route Problems - Any locations that were troublesome due to blowing or drifting; melt and refreeze issues; cold spots, multiple accidents or icing? j. Coordination with Law Enforcement - Did we adequately communicate with emergency and law enforcement for storm events? 13 k. 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N 86TH 'VE 7 S 85722ssAVE Jil ® - I a s; N 65TH E 11 5 04TH AVE * N B4TH AVE y 0 II r 7 5 83RDAVE 5 83RD AVE N 82ND AVE * 5 82N D AVE N D AVE JOYCE P: 5 .IST AVE I M A 0 y HITISH DR I I 5 BOTH AVE 2 S 81ST AVE n N BOTH AVE N 82NDAVE , 0 .15 AVE , < $ o - • u) f ? * , 5 .__ . 2 m 0 5 79TH AVE 5 BOTH AVE 3 5 * ? , 1 = S H V E S 79THAV 5 VALLEY WY 0 .ii 0 ( y ; < ' C; . A 77.# 5, A 5 78TH AVE ii )_F, 12 r 4 p>„ D N 79TH -1 N AVE )>C7 00 0 C> ' 0 5 8TH AlE S 79TH AVE " MOM c ; N 78 H AVE C4' ''' 0\ (3) z L I VE __ A GO 2 1 5 76 H AVE EM 0 EILN ! i) ”T 4 i i. 5 0 ' a 5,, s 700 0 AV I A D < 0 H N 753TH AVE 5 77TH AVE 5 76TH AVE , 576T AVE . N 76THAV * < 9AV H19L 0 -2t 5 76TH AVE i !I To I 0 9,,, 1111 dl II, 574TH AVE rr 5 8 AVE 5 75TH AV g c 3 JADE PL A S 74TH AVE I risi N 74TH AVE CC"‘'4 1 • I;■■■■ 30 III m v co 0 r 2 ; 0 2 I Y 1 E75 5 73RD AVE 3 g Y 0 ■ rt a M:4 m 73R-0 2 g 0 A rr m 4 21 9 VOYELS 4 VALLEYWEST AVE 6- 8 8 . N 72ND A E ; i 0 0 0 -i 5 72ND AVE F 5 72ND AVE 1 A gra m p g Ty Ayy 3 i 01.11 ;T;11 2, 0 3 A SNOW MASS LN 2 .9 r;' -gi c, 0 ow s OTH AVE U AVE M : 'Cr)) 570TH " -„, 0 S 70TH AVE W v A 1 i k; -1 7 ZI rn : 1 , , 5 69 * 0 : r I. . 110 69TH AVE co 0 * ' A -I 7 C 0 \ ‘'‘ \ T 52.3 .51008 091 LW 8 0 1WO, e HAVE AVE > ro 1 664 < * S 68TH AV: m A 4 5 6BT H A lir H AV E 5 ; m , „, N 68TH AVE -I ijil a M c i l c!) I; -..;‘ 68TH AVE 5 67TH AVE ,455 ‘0 4.4 fir lt N67TH AVE ..?.. 3A 15159 S 4,5; 071 1111 PICKENS RD S II rc; : 1 r., 0 0 N 6TH AVE I '■■• n 5 66TH AVE )5'4 5 66TH AVE t 0 , r, ....• N 6t,/ > < .3 1 r 65TH FL I 0 A co V -I 5 co 0 A PAR ONS AVE N .5TH AVE 55 -0 65115 -3 r c ® AVE 1* 64 AVE 0 , 710Ij cE WICHE CANYON LN 2 m 5 64TH AVE 0 o 5 64TH AVE N 63RD AVE 5 62ND AVE A MU 5 63RD AVE AV E STAVE N mo II sl1 ND -KA. S w : s 60 60T A E V T te N 61ST AVE 3AV H 109 C : 5 / 06 0 0 S3° "6 ? 3 AVE TH AVE -a VE '0 Gq 559TH AVEi 2 O 5 59TH A (k, ,%•5;20 ! 7 !'.(1') rlin91 1 'W;LIDNIGTITHNDRAVE 1 m , 5 58TH AVE al 4 59TH AVE N 59T 0:N 60 R a. • 51 V S 11 °C 4 N 5BTH AVE r NIT: c" 1 N 58TH PEE 4/0,4;° \\* ....._.Th 9AV I-1125 S : 0 557TH AVE * 0 nARAE PL El . I 8°°‘1‘eS- C m 21 ® s S 55TH AVE N 55TH AVE 1 111 ? s 0, • Q) el- 0 i , 4. Va • 1111 "RD;G N 54TH AVE 'PAt astalC:1,31:139„ ? >r IN/NOCRES N T DR l'% 'V \ . i ;2 3 CO 5 53RD AVE o C N 51ST Ay: 41411111104. 4 let '0 1 i, c , 0 . 0 c „ c S 51ST AVE * > A S 50TH AVE C 5 50TH AVE 5 51STA E 50TH AVE PM PEA77,7-ii N 50TH AVE N 49TH AV 549TH E A lb N 50TH AVE kill ralV O tpo / ■X 0 T 5 . m I 0 5 49TH PL - _ It m P48 AVE A k 5 4 TH AVE y p 0 P N 4 N 47TH AVE N 6TH MI g29 49 pey ‘ 1 ji v 5 47TH AVE I z r 1 r • 2 2 p4 AVE C E 546TH A 0 * 555 5.3 0 5: k II N 45TH AVE 5 45T AVE • N 45TH AVE BELLEVUE PL -1- crno C 6. -n 11111 ,z A 5 6TH AVE lj lj 0 A 5 46TH PL C? 13 ‘-‘gV /lip a ss; 6T 1 .11 rilil N 46TH AVE N 46TH co li 0, C5i, $55 ' G, ro 0 f II 0 0 5 44TH A ME o N 44TH AVE * N 44TH AVE I Py m 0 22 .6P * * 0, „ *5 44TH A r BEL AIR DR > -Y 0 ns H ns H EH 5 43RDA Fn. meX S N 42ND AVE m A- 8 84 4 0 W W 2 , c36, 8 88 .5 oR N 41ST AVE 5 42N 0 AVE . 42N DAV: 5 42ND AVE 5 0%,. N 2ND A E 05 1p 11 Er„: Q) 0 r.1 0 I', Aih... 40 1ST AVE 0 A z • 3 3 5 41STAi * y * * 4 0 Ili ffi FI.1 Il Lill i c,0 › F tat / r * <> m .0 ' oa m m N 39TH AVE ; -' Kil N39 ' E N 3 A TH AVE j n ' E 1 5 38TH AVE 11 0 A 0 `//). 4 I F 0 z , 9 z NEE • ti 1 z z 0 1111Fiit , ,,- 38TH AV I-. i .121 T. / 022 A N 37TH AVE 5 37TH AV 5 37TH AVE riZ DELMA• TER 0 5 Fi. ;; 0 a 0 . F 0 a 2 1 5 36TH AVE i S 36T IVE 0 1111 il l i Z eH s 33RD AvE 5 36T HA - o m ; ,t i 5 33RD AVE 0 1 CI CO * ul 36TH AVE 111 N 35TH AVE *1 • -. 0 A 0 0 ; Y' w m A> A r1 12 Il I ! 0 E 5'5 : „, C CI c - A 0 m E MI I ! r N 3 H AVE r 06 AV 3145 S 33RD AVE 5 26 • E 0>'' $ ll S 26TH AVE :11 DAVE I El a r :I= 01 M ALLEY Mr r-1 0 :S 26T AVE 5 I 4 3 ri 0 1■1 25TH AVE N24TH AVE N27TH AVE 0 0 N 25TH AVE 10 r26TH AV 11 N 26TH AV ALLEY N 27TH AVE N 28TH AVE N 26TH AVE N 25TH AV , 0 I ;;;N‘ 9375 0 n6 6 18 O 0 * . 51; AVE Y 31ST A 5 30TH AVE 5 34 HAVE my . 29TH A 0 P S 31 T AVE I 0 5 5 * c s 2TT A3 0 72360TT HHN AA2vv H3 TAV y. N31S rjo -0 7 o I E 8 8 N 30TH AVE ilo < 0> 1 S5 4 22 e ° Y -b. C' I 2 5 i 2 "2ND AVE 73 N 9TH A e ; : N 32NDAVE V 5Y; - 0 5 31 A 2 \ 1 28TH AV: 0 c r 2 X z 0 0 - 6 2 H AVE 5 r.1 5 r 2 5 26TH K ARR AVE (E 55:1 2NDA E S HA 'T Z ILTON ° E m M 5 25TH AVE V 5 29TH AVE 11 N , OTH AVE N 28TH AVE 0 AV E 0 Mr x EMI I n ME= F! CONRAD A E In * 5 4TH AVE no , 0> In c RD AVE N 23RD AVE N 22ND AVE 2 A 5 2313: AVE --/ 5 3RD AV Wk 0 '7, N 23RD AVE AV La %I S 22ND . jft N 22ND AVE N 22ND AVE jo 0 1ST AVE (7 2E . 5 1ST AV r; =4 :9 0 '2 ALLEY 1 r; '. 91 r LIL\ _ c 0S 20TH AVE S •SLEY 77 4 N 21ST AVE I AVE N 21ST AVE - A 0 0 co :;1'; 0 11. in O A -1 Es m 20TH VE -1 1 / M , 5 19TH AV: rilli ALLEY MEE rffl 1 A f l 18TH AVE 8TH AVE ro. * N 18TH Illa n ' -, 1;r:s 18TH AVE <' 1111111§ 111Wilirra MEM PC =Mr dig I OR 0 7: 0 m 11111 g 0 --.... 3 17TH ST d v-- Mlle Ila 0 I • 0 N 15TH AV 1.1. R7 616 91111 g 3 s 16TH AVE 15TH AVE a .2 13TH AvE s 14 AVE m s 1 I pu au Pi NM! a ■ Nei s 14TH AVE iiri rig LEW 5 1110 4TH AVE I MI M -7 III g 0 MEI nal M IA • a 11 • 1111 MI - j Mina ' 2 S 14TH AVE ., . MN likitin III ill IIIIIIIIIIII 1111 . 0 lialiM ALLEY Mill I 111111=11M = =BM ES ME 1111 0°g ili 1 111 IIIIIIIM Ici 4 ; 0 EEN AVE IME tom =lacrimal= 1 .07°1111P - d ‘ 70 rwhirraiitirimanarai E a MC El BB 111 0 =MEE= ■Il El= MEE- -MI IP M=M SIM • l' 1S1 1 OH 11111111111MIIII hill b PLEASA 12 < MI II pia 1 - 0 r t or ram Emi NE RE III T 5 TH AVE S 9T H AVE 0 /11 100144.0 111 II° ,, gM al II. 4 n IMME ALLEY n I MM. ar, 9_ Rita rage--,00w El WAS Siati 114 ORNELL AVE =Ea 7TH AVE M = ME EMI oak di smiTh i A is itlior m e lirr 100, 5 V gl ME D AVE m ti GORDON RD I a 100 AL PALM ; I 1 , 7 , ==lal 1011131, les I t * I..° * i . tn. I T: inn 1. , - - -TIMM 0* m m X, J/ MAICAA 0 == ; 1111= MOS Min 1 FI 5 5TH AVE El • S 5TH VE MM IMM a rat 0 411 ON RR‘'‘4 1•01 Jil "Z tb (2 3 ' MEM In Sirial 01011103.000 _,000,10101 all MEM ■ W; s alliolos 000 10 a 2ND ST / 5 4T AVE ■ Ea ■ De oiiim �® r I i 0 2 0 ‘35 5 2N AVE PAN ± WM" ale° 001 - ../ 13 Fri S 1ST AVE A 5 15 AVE MM 00W •••••••• 0 !q° ICS-Lnlilli ) " ' 61 T AVE . 1111 t= MS AVE 10 6°.. 10 IsaitArotolamimpin 0 m e0$ 0 10AV * LANDON AVE y 4 [kiil In if l' 1 rEa■IM lir 00 - .11 ,11 0 a 0 O 0 ; z ■ • � � ® � Elal f0 ''' rim 1 A GOO .5N RD 1 V= 2 c E 5: 0 GOODMAN RC ' tral EDWICH AVE III MI ALLEY ALLE i ALLEY Ore /O f° V4..1; / e .5 55......". 10 30 000 _••• ISO. O. 000 N ALLEY fiH S T r' 10% r Cak4 la OSIO 0 a ‘11* gial< • 0 milli". 5. 96g6 :He #0110 11111 O • j�* . , PRESSON pL VS -CC4 _ dis oll. Or 10 0 a s allitiM0 1 0 al. .. 0 IN I t l. ; a si dillaW s .diabWr ri alla r 1 i , -h nn, arawal g loppr ts eamtvisnrosis 0 so ■ -l < .. > n; _ w To ■ 0 „ , 1- /111 ' E. Irma m. ■ al. rot to . ■j ,_ , , . „to ci E0 ' 6TH ST > ' •/7 5: e ti I," tal -I mom iiii lima 100.40 OIND I : 1 DS.b / MARYLAND ' ALLEY 0 Er,. _ f x SUTHERLAND DR ria MEI Ea Illa MMila0 1 ■ • 00 0.3 • a a alla lam la le„ ,, ,;, s 10TH ST . BAY ST 0,-> _ __ ifm 1 N 11TH S i2 latoo „il , ilinoi- __. 4..,e CH 1-150/V4 4 x o 1111 - ` -44a ED s 11TH ST 5 12TH ST M EMEI 2TH ST 'ir-g, • • c - IN 44 . > a , m c s 12TH ST 3 13TH • SI II 3 13TH T 3 14TH 3 S 15TH M r ,L 51 MO= co N 15TH ST R 0 c4 M g II A m m ii MI I rr* 0 11 5TH Ifij) m 0 co 0 * a A n. 4TH ST 1111 ‘5/ . S 16TH HORGAN • _ M 5 16TH ST -1 M-,11.. =MI En NNW ''‘‘' 5 17TH ST ) 11 Mat ID ILIMMIS 5 18TH ST S 18 ST ■ • 0 1 .5 anal. mar a 0 Lmma:giglldigr"le ili°5' 11111Mniski'v SI m Ma ETE r;1 r 1. ..s, D a==. i' . MAIN • MMIENta A 530 1 2 CI m 4 (C) LEY MC , < i' com - 5 20TH ST S 19 H ST r:1°. 14! ALLEY 1132 RAMP 313 a co co 5_ c=, ...„01111011101 B TTERF LD RD 22 .... .0.1.............. . - MP ES ellr 1111 < _ O DC'. l'Y' A0C'da. 7 0 0 ID ''‘.‘6‘4‘4° I 132 HWY E 955 ,5 ; R I VICTORY LA 0 4 S 22ND ST KR CUTOFF -0 N P3033 RD ONSTANCE WY c „44°3°° °Nov rla - ;27 A 0 2 5' 55 (F, (ID 0 < ill 5 5 0 5 b z - 6- U) c . 4 cv 0 ..... 7: I . . A .R g ggglb S [ OTH 0 - CO rr, n 0 Z n R • w IVERSITY P Y N 33RD ST c 'NG% A IR I =SRSg590 A 34TH ST 1 Ez 0 E 0 0 ,, Koch, r?s, N 8 1 inch = 3,000 feet WE Snow A reas 5 -1 Y -, : - .. , ,,.. •-,..L.,,„„. . ' . , " . . ,....._,,, „ i ii 1 1 11 i . , ‘ - Atmi‘b.4\ . ..\ '''' t.. _ - i . ' AP PIW-4 41; 'r 1 PV illir I t . - - .-,,_„,.. `` � -_ .WI , r �� q cAN, 7 „,,,.,,,,„,. 1I \ _- \ , '� /•'• TER' .7 ` ..,�.. ...._.... 82 , __z z, LKS MEMORI - . - . MM. --215110.111 r - . .nk :I liteminal,' visio- 2 ---- -.-- Ab 1 - go rm 1„.. • � '� ! RID. � : , ;�Q:� � � � '�� \ u --iiiv cii ..IiiC . w w �� . t r ,� w _ 44TH AVE lr iN1III P' �� Yi gi o \ lii .: : 7 Ail , .' a .! - . - ■.� \ zitirtso h Ai • - MIT IIIIERIMINTIlii.----BEHILLELasilln* I _ � .H ING. . 1.� , i 11 11I1 _: ii & ' ISENHOWE' !IU LIII P I 1 Irn!III .• STAT I� - ll■ "'11 DPA^ .NW001 ' � � WILSON �p� 'RSON P��q�� \ SO UTHE � O M NIT CENT 1' ` - - CC I 5�A , � _ I 5 1 4 AREAARBORE \ � � _ . �E OLLa , IPB11 111"111 1 I�II ■1 YVCC a ' _ ■■ -NI �IINIO t.., . ' - L IL •• ism_ . 10 iti ._Birohunirsaminhoriumnit\\„,\ III w COMMUNITY PARK - � . I1 I1 p 1�I II I1 ,III linw.,101111 111, nt '\\ ■i�i ■■ •'NDALL PAR a ■� I 1I�RII�11 IIIII / ST VALL �, �� LO- '� 1.1111411111:011.1111 ., , t J S. ,��1 " � �1I1� '.,`_ ' RTIN LUTH� R KING • _ .. _ .. il - - AJ.I I m ■ u11�m� .�'ia CAHALAN •ARK iiir Imo �� I limmomum. '' rip �1�r11 \ \ \'\ W W ' ' ' - : ' ' ... " • ' MI dommliastim EN D 0 E li ■1■LL� ■ ■ N II IUNRJILI' .. , . M. . :'. _ : ::::::',. :111 ' 1: AH TANUM YOUTH PARK