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12/05/2019 02 Affordable Housing and Housing Action Plan a\'4\lyy bxk ik 1 1-:41 PPPPPP+Pd s' lii it tYlltYlA.\ta. BUSINESS OF THE CITY COUNCIL YAKIMA, WASHINGTON AGENDA STATEMENT Item No. 2. For Meeting of: December 5, 2019 ITEM TITLE: Affordable Housing and Housing Action Plan Study Session SUBMITTED BY: Joan Davenport, Director of Community Development Joseph Calhoun, Planning Manager SUMMARY EXPLANATION: The Study Session will include an overview of the 2020 project to draft a Housing Action Plan, in conformance with HB 1923; a general discussion of Affordable Housing topics and the related topics of housing equity issues. The Study session will be led by the staff at BERK Consulting, Inc. It is anticipated that the City of Yakima Community Integration Committee will assist the project in facilitating community engagement. Time will be reserved for public comments. The Council is interested in statements from providers and other interested parties about their role in affordable housing and how the City might most efficiently participate in the development of new housing. ITEM BUDGETED: STRATEGIC PRIORITY: APPROVED FOR SUBMITTAL BY THE CITY MANAGER RECOMMENDATION: Provide direction to the Scope of Work for the Housing Action Plan. Discuss how the Community Integration Committee can assist in outreach and engagement efforts on this topic. ATTACHMENTS: Description Upload Date Type Fiousin pRan 0 0 11/2 /201 backup Matonal C opt_ P aunol presentation 11/27/2019 Presentation HOUSING 'Yakima Comprehensive Pion 2040 5.1 Introduction The future demand for housing is a crucial element of this plan. There is need to accommodate current and future population demands in a variety of housing types and affordability levels. This Housing Element contains the goals, policies, and implementation actions that will help Yakima achieve high quality, Housing Goal-Growth Management affordable, and equitable housing for today's generations forward. Act Yakima acknowledges that the marketplace will generally provide adequate housing to meet demand for Encourage the availability of affordable t those in the upper economic brackets, but that some combination of appropriately zoned land, regulatory housing to all economic segments of the incentives, housing funding and rehabilitation programs, and innovative planning techniques will be population of this state, promote a t ty necessary to meet the needs of middle and lower income residents. Understanding this challenge,and the variety of residential densities and current housing trends, helps the City plan for the future. housing types, and encourage t preservation of existing housing stock. (RCW 36.70A.020 (4)) Imail safe Int II We age Varna A[lUS|N(� Yakima Comprehensive Plan 2O4D 5^2 Conditions and Trends Most of YakiNNa's Housing Stock is Single Family Homes Around 60 percent ofstructures in 2015 were single family detached units, and another percent of 20 or MobileMobileBoat,RV,etc.morevan,si/uciurcsvve/e sing|e-fanni|yaUachedunits. Only 7.4 percent of structures had I0ornnore units (A[S' home Z015). Yakinna'shousing structures are predominantly one to four bedroom units, with a combined 78.3 percent of units failing into these categories. to I Between 2OOO and ZOl5, total units in Yakima grew by around 2].5% from 2B4O4] toJ5,]76 (A[S, Z0l5). unit Overall growth in units in Yakima between 2000 and 2016 included an increase in 7.29 square miles (4,813 ^'." acres) from annexation. A but Half ofl[akiNNa's Residents Are Renters 2 mwmw In 2014, an estimated 54 percent of units were owner-occupied, while 46 percent of units were renter- occupied. Based on Vacancy Rates, Yaki0ma's Housing Supply is Low Housing Structure Shares and Types (AC6, Vacancy rates,as an indicator of housing markets, can provide information about how supply and 2014) demand are interacting and how the market and prices may react. In 2014,vacancy in Yakima was around 4.9 percent for renters and Z.0 percent for owners. More recent ZO16 data showed atightening of vacancy rates, particularly for renters,of 2.0 percent. Several unit types (1 and 2 bedroom) show a vacancy rate of 1 percent. (Runstad Center for Real Estate Studies/University of Washington,spring 2016) Most ofl[aki0ma's Housing Stock is Old In 2014,only 10 percent of residential structures had been built since 2000,and 50.1 percent of units were built 4Oor more years ago. Since housing units generally have a functional life of around 48 years, those units older than 40 years require additional investments. Preserving existing housing is important to uu�m � � � ` ��� et HC. .JSINC.; Yakima Comprehensive Plan 2040 maintain affordability. A map of structure age (both residential and commercial) is shown in Exhibit 5-1; the vast majority of structures in the city are residential with older stock focused in eastern Yakima. Exhibit 5-1. Year Structure Built Map is YAKIMA eroTo . . . . COMPREHENSIVE PI AN UPDATE . 6:I Prttpettiet by Vette&Ott 4...g. N 44-^ - Fvt-2,.':. - .--.. •.... .. , , . 4.E; t.....,.::: :i'• . _a E. fpsrrfr it' :4.:' ... ‘ I. .P :9 4z... ':...7 • EF E:':::- l't -4"' '. i ¼ ,...,. y, -..,-.. ""' .7.10- ir. . '''.. -,:ii c";;;7'•'. -. ."'.'.'" 'f-,." ".,-;.!, 'L.'',...;7,-..is 'i x;),) 2'3 .0„F?•;:liEN .- . .:•"7,1 0 i:j y,,,,ct, C-7-77-ii '...eir'l :: i-- . ..... .., ,. ....„.. Lr-- • : i.-- .ftio k "n4 444Z44:4..,.1 ./.... , .! N At Ct 0$ 'Miles! I t t a i .t . I ttia-b .e. .. ' t7 Source:City of Yakima GIS 2016 t memisky: .6, 6 Aihat :::MEI::: Ha F ::::fte::: 1, viliZ, AAU\|NC Yakima Comprehensive Plon2O48 The overall agro(housing structures is indicative of structure quality,supported by national research that o 2 1 e shows a negative correlation between the age of a unit and its condition. In addition, the older housing in Yakima is generally not aligned well with the current and trending household needs in terms of household oraoxe/ 4,51 L�n size, the high number of hnosrho|cb without children, relatively low income levels, and the age Mvo 1.51 3�o den00%raphicsof the dty. Alternately, Yaki/na's cuneotpopu|adonindicates an increasing need for noore wav .79 small houses, townhouses, multifamily, and accessory dwelling units. T»vvp~5h 3,77 Suoovsioe 3/1 Low Average Household Size Uotoo 3/1 Within Yakima city limits, average household d dnn z�� inl015w�r� an �� a0.dl.68peo omndv/,w 3.7 .7 ��h /� and average family sizes were anesbma|eJlJ0peonn per bmi|y (AC\ IOl5). Yakinna has annnn6the xava lowest average household sizes in the county (see chart to thr ,ighfl. Mn^eo 3,41 Zillah 3,0/ Yakima isa [onnnnunitV for the Young and Old Population ,aumo— 3.04 o Union �' Th� O�y� popu|ahoni�g,�hn�o|drronavrra�r, wi�hrnnr� ,�hr�,��hananyo�hr,�ornn^oni�yinYakirna �nl ,m�m�m�m�m�� County. Yet, the City isalso seeing an increasing non^hrrofchildren, particularly in east Yakinna. Both Yakima .73 seniors and children grew by 5 percent between 2000 and 2010 citywide.The City needs tn address housing mac^es 2.71 and services for older generations such as aging in place, health, and mobility. The City also needs |n «ni'"d... z,«/ address needs of younger residents such as education and recreation, Vwashi"*... 2.55 S,|lm 2A5 The median age in Yakima inl015was 33.l, which has increased slightly over the previous 15 years. An estimated 30.6 percent of the population in 2014 was under 20 years of age,and an estimated 13.8 percent Average, Household Size, inYakima was 65 and older, County and Communities (ZV1-1) uu�u � � ��� ���V/ � - ''"�"'mu�u�u� m ^" HC)i.J5iNG Yakima Comprehensive Plan 2040 Yakima Has Many Young Residents but the Majority of Yakima Households Have No :::AeGSte.ot Percent Children Under 20 years 30.6% 20-64 years 55 8% As of 2014, the City of Yakima contained approximately 33,074 households. About 29 percent of 65 and older 13.8% households consist of single persons,and another 24 percent of householders are married with no children at home;this means over half of the City's households have single or coupled adults and no children.About Population by Age (ACS, 2014) 19 percent of households consist of married persons with children,and another 14 percent are households with single men or single women with children at home. Last, 14 percent of households are classified as other households (e.g. non-married households without children). Future housing opportunities would need to address both small units for those living alone as well as larger houses for families with children. Exhibit S-2.City of Yakima Household Characteristics: 2014 Single Parent, Children, 14% Other Households, 14% zettetteezelettattlettatatatetteettazzazaz zzzzzzzzzzR.rf .:::-:....:Trozzazzateue 2======zzzz,.L:,..;.*zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz Tt Source:U.S.Census 5-Year ACS,2014; BERK Consulting 2016 Persons Aged ES and Older as a Percent of Total Population (ACS, 2014) Oaf* • eate : FC5 4likageWittita:: A[lUS|N(� Yakima Comprehensive Plan 2O4D Almost a Quarter of YakiNNa's Population Lives Below the Poverty Level About 22.8 percent of the City's population earns incomes below the federal poverty level. This is higher than the state as a whole (13.5%). It is within the range of communities in Yakima County. Because the City has the largest population in the County, the City's total persons in poverty is greater than other communities. Affordable housing options are critical for this population. uuM � gob HOUSNG Yakima Comprehensive Plan 2040 Percent of Population Below Federal Poverty Level Yakima County and Communities: 2014 9/ 38,212 914 29 911 29.515 9929:99) 75 2% /011. 14 172 13 524 72:4 12 521 4/7499 12.413 49:39 2, 2 alt 1 , 77.171 M Nfaa • 4WeligeNattina HOUSNG Yakima Comprehensive Plan 2040 Verneorneto-Static riert ,J'eSi Swiss 33.SCic Seckk Cerk:. Moea. icA'ss! :car la assaao. 22.8ra Hn,Ta: 215% Srvsdr 72.3aS TaSon Grancsaav '15,6% ringer sass ' ISSaSS ;asps-as ' LaSas Mato:. ' Saaa, ,..vs pa% 1.2saa Source:Yakima County,2016;US.Census 5-Year ACS,2014. Demand for Special Needs Housing and Programs Several populations may have special housing needs or supportive services, including the homeless, residents with disabilities,single parents,seasonal and year-round farmworkers, and the elderly. 44 According to the Homeless Network of Yakima County, in 2015 homelessness had decreased by over 44 percent since 2006. Homelessness still affects families with children, couples,and single persons. As of 2014, the City of Yakima has the most persons with a disability in the county, and the second highest share of the population at 15.3 percent, behind Union Gap. Malt Eli:: • Hal: r 4likatte:Wittita:: A[lUS|N(� Yakima Comprehensive Plan 2O4D m Single parent households, particularly female headed households,are more likely to have lower incomes and potentially have cost burdens. As of 2014,over 10 percent of city households are female headed and another almost 4 percent are male-headed with chi ldren. m As described above,the elderly make up almost 14 percent of the city's population in 2014.The elderly often have disabilities—about 46 percent—requiring universal housing designs that meet ` ambulatory needs. Continuum of care housing and services allowing aging in place are other considerations over the planning period. m The City of Yakima is located at the heart of Yakima County, which employs many farmworkers at the � farms, orchards,and livestock operations throughout the County. Many of these workers struggle to find stable housing. The City of Yakima and other non-profit agencies offer a number of services that address maintaining and Asof2Ol2, 3Z% of city renters are cost attaining housing to meet the needs of low income households, disabled persons, and senior citizens in burdened and 49% nf owners are cost the community. burdened. Ensuring there are opportunities in Housing Value UsIncreasing in YakiNNa ��� ��������� �� ����� ������������/���x������� ' develop a variety of housing types and Appreciation rates have been above average for the last 10 years, at an annual average of 2.5 percent. densities affordable to different income Home sales prices have jumped by $20,000 in the last year. The median priced home is attainable to half |,vc|s can help to address current and nf the City'sresidents. However, in Z014, nearly half ofYakinoa's homeowners were cost burdened and future households and their cost burden. nearly one third of renters are cost burdened. Rental Costs ThcRunsiad [cnierforKca| EsiatcRcsearohhasnotcdthaiin2O10ihatinthcpreviousycar °...Yakirna County has recorded the greatest decrease in vacancy rate with a considerable drop of 5.8 percent (from 7.8%to 1.7%)." If supply does not keep up with demand, it is likely that rental rates will increase. In the City there is a gap of over 3,300 units affordable to those earning lower incomes. Many households have tn pay more than they can afford for the units that are available. uuM � A[lUS|N(� Yakima Comprehensive Plan 2O4D Homeowner Costs &sofZ01S, the [ouniy'shousing supply showed it was relatively affordable for a metropolitan area and that there was a large share of homes for sale below the median home price. Recent price increases were leading the state inI01l |nZO16, around 56% nfhouseholds can afford a median home price, with homeownership less attainable for the remaining 46% of the population. To purchase a single family home at the current median selling price a household would need to earn $38,477 annually or$3,206 monthly. There are an estimated 18,402 households in Yakima with incomes greater than $35,000, or 56% of the population that can afford the median home price inYakima. 5^3 Challenges and Opportunities Yakima currently provides a relatively affordable housing stock, the majority of which are single family homes. The City has additional capacity for housing with a large share of land that is developable, particularly to the west,and a good portion of the City that provides an opportunity for infill development �—:�' and redevelopment. Low vacancy rates in Yakima are leading ioa pressure onhousing supply as the population grows and the housing stock ages. New housing will be needed to replace units that have reached the end of their useful life and to house new residents. In addition,a diversity of housing types will be needed in order to provide units that fit the needs of large and small households,special needs populations,those aging in place, and a diversifying population. Yakima has a vision of being a place that provides affordable and quality housing equally to all residents across the city. The City has sufficient capacity to meet future housing growth targets for 2848. Yakirna's strategy is to focus on infill housing downtown and in mixed use centers, with compatible transitions to ground-related townhomes and single family dwellings. The capacity in Downtown Yakima and mixed use nodes will create an increased supply of smaller units in multifamily or mixed use residential structures 20I7 Capacity for New Units bx vvhi|rthe undeveloped land capacity to the vvrstvvi|| result in added single fanni|yunits. ' Council District mn Undeveloped and QedexmUopaWUe [mnd uu�m � ��00 A[lUS|N(� Yakima Comprehensive Plan 2O4D 5,4 Goals and Policies GOAL 5.I. ENCOURAGE DIVERSE AND AFFORDABLE HOUSING CHOICES. Pn|ioicy 5.1.1- Monitor market rate and affordable housing needs. Review and adjust land capacity for housing ^ development and redevelopment based on housing needs. 5.1.2. Promote the preservation, improvement, and developmentof single family homes in Yakima. 5.1.3. Encourage mixed use infill development, particularly Downtown and in commercial nodes. 5.1.4. Facilitate small lot sizes, condominiums, clustering and other options that increase the supply of affordable homeownership options and the diversity of housing that meet the needs of aging, young professional,and small and large households. 51.5� Allow accessory dwelling units in single family zones to increase the supply of affordable housing units and tn help existing homeowners remain in their homes. fJ.& Allow manufactured homes on individual lots in residential zones in accordance with the provisions of stair and federal law. Apply development and design standards equally in manufactured housing and other residences. �~ 5.1.7. Promote the improvementof existing mobile home parks to meet health and safety standards and quality nf life needs ofresidents. 52.& Encourage and incendviac affordable housing development. 52.9� Support proposals for affordable assisted and market rate housing based on the following criteria: m Dispersion of affordable housing throughout the City m Convenient access tntransit � � m A range of unit types m Ownership housing when possible m Long-term affordability ii uuM � A[lUS|N(� Yakima Comprehensive Plan 2O4D 5l18. Remove barriers io development of affordable and market rate housing. ~.'� ~ ' m Maintain aouninR systcrn that allows a wide range of housing types and densities. 7. vi m Use creative SEPA tools such as exemption thresholds, infill and mixed use exemptions, or planned actions io encourage housing and streamline permitting. m Ensure that City fees and permitting time are set at reasonable levels so they do not adversely affect the cost ofhoudng � 51.11� Encourage a range of affordable homeownership options and provide access to education for first time buyers. 5A.12� Participate in efforts to secure land available for affordable housing. 5A.11 Allow for well-designed farmworker housing recognizing the City of Yakima's role as the primary city in the agricultural Yakima valley with the greatest range of housing opportunities, urban infrastructure,and public services. GOAL 5.2. PRESERVE AND IMPROVE EX|ST|BG RESIDENTIAL NEIGHBORHOODS. Policies 52.1. Invest in and improve quality of life in existing neighborhoods. 52.1 Support programs that improve and preserve Yakirna's existing housing stock. 52.1 Seek alternatives, when feasible, to demolition and removal of units from housing stook. 52.,E Encourage maintenance and preservation of existing housing. Maintain the Oiy's Housing Repair Assistance Program for low-and moderate-income homeowners. GOAL 5.3. ENSURE AN ADEQUATE SUPPLY BFHOUSING FOR PERSONS WITH SPECIAL NEEDS. Policies 53.1� Prioritize the provision of fair share housing opportunities to all economic n,Rnnenis of the population and those with special needs. m ���� A[lUS|N(� Yakima Comprehensive Plan 2O4D 5.3.2. Support development of new units and the operation of existing units for housing persons with ` special needs such as the disabled and elderly. Promote universal design principles in new and rehabilitated housing to ensure housing is designed for all persons and abilities. 53.1 Support programs that offer assistance to homeless individuals and families. 53.4. Support programs and housing options that allow the senior population to age in place as their housing needs change. GOAL S.4, ENCOURAGE DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION, AND MAINTENANCE OF HIGH QUALITY HK]W5|KU6 � 5A.1� Promote sustainable development practices in housing development. 5A.1 Use transitional densities, design and landscape standards to ensure housing is compatible with existing character and planned goals. 54.3. Encouragedovr|oprnoniofvveU'dcdgnednovvhousingincoordinabonvviihpopubiiongrovvih, employment growth,and transportation goals. 5.4.4. Coordinate future housing development with capital planning and investment. 5.4.5. Implement utility standards that encourage inhUdevelopment. 5A.& Ensure rnukinnoda| public and private transportation options are available for new and redeveloped housing. fA.T Promote complete streets and trails to interconnect Yakima's neighborhoods and promote vva|kabi|ity. fA.& Promote safe, energy efficient, and healthy housing attainable tn very |nvv , |ovv- and moderate- income households. Explore measures in improve indoor air quality and foster construction methods that reduce dust, mold,and air ioxicn concentrations in the homes. m � A[lUS|N(� Yakima Comprehensive Plan 2O4D GOAL 5.5� CU&TEgA CARING CO$N$NUB|LYTMATB8gTURESAND SUPPORTS INDIVIDUALS, CHILDREN, AND THEIR FAMN|W v��E�� �� 5j2� Make human services more inclusive and accessible to the Yakima community. , 5j2 Identify opportunities and develop strategies that are proactive and preventative in their approach in human services needs. 5J.1 Allocate City general funds and seek federal and state funds to offer human services that the City ' can best provide tn address a spectrum nf community needs. 5�5.Zk Consider human services objectives in developing City regulations and codes. For example, 0. enforcing code abatement may mean making people honnr|rssEn�urinJthcrcarroornnnunitY .......... � resources io assist these residents, before they are abated, iscritical. 5j.5. Cooperate with school districts and non-profit human service providers to identify needs and effective delivery ofservices to individuals, children,and families. 5.5.6. Educate the community about and promote affordable and special needs housing and human services facilities and programs. Conduct early and ongoing public outreach and communication during program or project review and apply appropriate conditions of approval that address community concerns such as traffic congestion, public service provision,or environmental quality. 5.5 Implementation Yakima's Housing Element is implemented through the actions and investments made by the City with the support of its residents and stakeholders. Some of these actions include regulatory changes, partnerships, coordination, administrative acts, policy changes, human service programs, and capital investments. The following implementation items aid in this process. W14 VII/ ���W���������� �( AAU\|NC Yakima Comprehensive Plan 2O48 Exhibit 5-1 Housing Implementation limplwnwnmatiom:Aan Wctinm�www BesUvwd:11wwmlit Strategic plan, updated periodically, that " Data nn housing inventory provides anassessm*ntofcurrentond and needs projected housing needs, housing market[�yo�Yukimu ^ Inventory ofaffordable tr*nds, inventory conditions, barriers tm Consolidated Plan housing providers providing affordable housing, a list mfcurrent " Increase inaffordable providers,and o five-year strategy for providing housing affordable housing. A Ten-Year Plan,vEnd " Data nnhnmeleonp5s Homelessness:8Five Report nn local efforts and strategies. " Decrease homelessness Year Update Annual Action Plan for " Investment inaffordable CD8G and HOME hnusin�npedsand Plan for use o[fedem|fundsupda\�dannua| y Investment Partnership ` community development Fwnds,2816 needs " Housing needs data for Yakima County seasonal and year-round Fa,,nm/n,kp,Hnu�in� strategic plan for approaching issues related '» brmw/nrkers farmwnrkerhousing Action Plan,lV1l-7Vl6 " Increased housing stability [nr(arm^vnrkers " Ensure code aligns with goals and needs inthe Znn)ngCvde,Y01{Tlt|e Regulatory law on housing development, community 15 amended asneeded ^ Remove barriers to affordable housing City housing program administered through the " Increased investment in Senior/Disabled Office nf Neighborhood Development,othose neighborhoods Home Repair Program who qualify(income and asset restrictions) ^ Aesthetic improvements uuM � m�V/ ��mm�� - UkAwNafikilm AAU\|NC Yakima Comprehensive Plon2O48 linsplunwntatiowhom ActiorrTyll Besivwd:11wwmit City housing program administered through the " Increased investment in Exterior Paint Program Office of Neighborhood Development to those neighborhoods who qualify(age and disability restrictions) ^ Aesthetic improvements Homeowners hip Through City housing program administered through the New Construction Office nf Neighborhood Development to those " Increased homeownership who qualify(income restrictions) Office of Neighborhood Development Services ^ |mprovpdtpnan4'bnd|ord Tenant/Landlord program u/assist either tenants nrlandlords relationships Counseling with disputes and advice onreaching " Education nnlegal support agreements mr seeking legal support. for those inneed &City program within the Yakima Target Area that provides funds tn purchase lots for . New housing stock eddeodaldevelopment projects. Lots must he Lo�Auqui�bionPro�ram " Neighborhood revitalization residentially zoned, have vacant nrsubstandard ^ buildings,and be developed within 1Zmonths New inAl|development of purchase. &City program designed to provide increased " Special valuations for eligible Dnvvntnvvn residential opportunities. This program is improvements in Redevelopment Tax Intended to stimulate new mu|\f-broi|yhousing residentially deficient urban Incentiven, 8/Nl P,ngnoC and the rehabilitation n(vacant and centers. 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City Council has provided feedback and guidance . BERK worked in collaboration with City of Yakima planning division to develop a draft approach and scope of work with attention to Council desires. This approach addresses the grant requirements from Commerce and also addresses local needs and concerns. Our plan is to refine this scope of work after review by City Council and local stakeholders. Proposed Process Step 1. Develop Step 2. Assess Step 3. Evaluate Outreach and > Housing Needs ' Housing Market Engagement Plan Conditions v Step 4. Develop Step 5. Evaluate Strategies to > Opportunities for , Step 6. Develop Address Housing Infill Development Housing Action Plan Needs A Step 1 . Develop Outreach and Engagement Plan Budget allocation for outreach Key Tasks • One third of budget for • Identify stakeholders and potential local partners community outreach and ❑ City of Yakima Community Integration Committee engagement. ❑ Yakima Housing Authority Yakima School District in Includes funds to ❑ Yakima Community Foundation compensate potential ❑ Yakima Hispanic Chamber of Commerce Other community-based organizations and leaders local partners to aid in outreach and facilitation . • Collect information about key issues of community concerns ■ Solicit input on how and when to engage residents a Develop an outreach and engagement plan g Step 2 . Assess Housing Needs Purpose Key Tasks ■ Identify gaps between ■ Review and build on previous efforts housing needs in the ❑ Yakima Comprehensive Plan ❑ City of Yakima Equity Study Analysis community and what the • Analyze available data housing market is ❑ Consider current residents, current workforce, and currently providing projected population growth. • Solicit input from stakeholders and residents ■ Identify current and future housing needs by household types and income levels J Permanent supportive or transitional housing Workers living alone Couples and small families Large families Seniors g Step 3 . Evaluate Housing Market Conditions Purpose Key Tasks in Identify barriers to the • Analyze rents, housing prices, vacancy rates types of new housing a Review development regulations development that can most effectively address • Evaluate construction trends by housing housing needs type, price-points, and geography a Interview housing industry professionals for additional insights ❑ Local and regional housing developers ❑ City planners and permitting staff ❑ Other stakeholders II Step 4. Develop Strategies to Address Housing Needs Purpose Key Tasks in Identify the most • Review successful strategies used in cities promising approaches to with similar market characteristics increasing housing • Create a menu of options for review and supply and diversity in consideration by city staff, stakeholders, Yakima, based on local and planning commission members. needs and market conditions •• Determine which strategies have the greatest potential to gain local support and address local needs. :iii10 Step 5 . Evaluate Opportunities for Infill Development Purpose Key Tasks ■ Identify potential catalyst ■ Work closely with City GIS and planning sites and city actions to staff to identify potential infill building sites help incite market and willing land-owners. interest and activity. ■ Identify any barriers to development and steps the city or partners can take to address. ■ Develop a web mapping tool to share opportunities with potential developers Step 6 . Develop Housing Action Plan Purpose Key Tasks ■ Build consensus around a ■ Identify regulatory changes, partnerships, set of concrete next or funding needed to implement the steps to implement housing strategies housing strategies that • Proforma analysis to evaluate how market can increase housing may respond to proposed incentives or supply and diversity in regulatory changes City of Yakima ■ Outreach to educate residents and solicit input. ■ SEPA review Proposed Schedule ................................. .................................. ................................. O 20tr rtzt 2020 2021 .................................. ................................. .................................. DECEMBER JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL MAY JUNE JULY AUGUST SEPTEMBER OCTOBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER JANUARY FEBRUARY j,�, City Council City Council T� Study Session Public Hewing Periodic Council Briefings All P Community Outreach& Community Outreach&. Stakeholder Engagement Engagement Round 1 Engagement Round Meetings & i i i.......................... ................ ............. ' ......I �,.,. ..,.....,.,. ........,.,. ..,.....,..I Outreach Advisory Advisory Advisory 1111 Committee Meeting 1111 Committee Meeting 1111 Committee Meeting Planning Commission Meeting .................................................. .................................................. Outreach& Infill Opportunities ................... ' Engagement Plan Mapping Tool ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, 1 :::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: .................................................. Draft Needs ....... Assessment Preliminary Draft Housing Action Non Final Needs .................................................. .................................................. Assessment RevisedDraftHousing .................................................. Action Plan 1Menu of Housing Recommended Strategies Housing Strategies ------------------------- .................................................. g g g .................................................. 6 6