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10/15/2019 09 Youth Gang Suppression Implementation Grant from DOJ „„tibYnT7E4:tkt ✓ Og `pd 0 8dd { e'e 4t4..h3it BUSINESS OF THE CITY COUNCIL YAKIMA, WASHINGTON AGENDA STATEM ENT Item No. 9. For Meeting of: October 15, 2019 ITEM TITLE: Resolution accepting the Youth Gang Suppression Implementation Grant from the Department of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention SUBMITTED BY: Sara Watkins, Senior Assistant City Attorney SUMMARY EXPLANATION: As part of the GRIT Proviso grant, the City was tasked with creating a structure and program that was viable and could compete for future grants. The GRIT program included the GRIT Village structure of networking and education for community members, stakeholders and providers, the Steering Committee, and the Yakima Youth Leadership Program in the Yakima School District middle schools, also in partnership with ES D 105. We piloted the YYLP last year with Gary Garza in two middle schools and compiled the data. Council previously received the researched report from Julia Van Olphen. The City applied for one of a small number of OJ J DP Youth Gang Suppression grants in June of 2019. The City was notified that it was awarded the Grant, which totals $230,000.00 over three years. In accepting the Grant, the City would be acknowledging that it agrees that the money would be used, and the program will be run, as outlined in the grant narrative (attached)and that the City will adhere to the grant assurances requirements (also attached). Attachments: 1. Summary of Program 2. Copy of Program Narrative provided to OJJ DP which outlines program 3. Copy of Budget Narrative provided to OJJDP with outlines budget 4. Gang Suppression program timeline submitted to OJJDP 5. Letter of Intent from ESD 105 6. Letter of Intent from YS D ITEM BUDGETED: Yes STRATEGIC PRIORITY: Public Safety APPROVED FOR �� SUBMITTAL: L---/t/C - ---_ -� - Interim City Manager 2 STAFF RECOMMENDATION: Adopt resolution. BOARD/COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION: GRIT had an independent Steering Committee which consisted of community members and Cour Members Gutierrez, White and Hill. It was also discussed at full Council and in the Public Sat Committee meetings. ATTACHMENTS: Description Upload Date Type D ra53ultrtifin 1D/9/2019 Cu'er!demo D Summary of program 1016/2019 Cthier Menlo D Program nanal 15VS/7019 Cows.Menlo O buclyet narrati% 1015/2019 Cuer MWS)1U D Program timfiAirie 10IS12019 CcAer Menlo D EEL)105 len&cif intent 1016/2019 Coins Menlo Cl YS D Idler of artent 10/B12019 Curer Memo 3 RESOLUTION NO. R-2019- A RESOLUTION accepting the Youth Gang Suppression Implementation Grant from the Department of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention WHEREAS, the City of Yakima was granted a $150,000.00 proviso from Washington State Governor Inslee in 2018 to create a community-based framework and pilot program to address youth gang involvement, interest and violence with a goal of using that framework to obtain future grants; and WHEREAS, a Steering Committee, the Village of stakeholders that meets every other month and the Yakima Youth Leadership Program were created and piloted during the proviso period, and an independent evaluation was done on the program; and WHEREAS, pursuant to proviso, the City of Yakima applied for the Youth Gang Suppression Implementation Grant, a $230,000.00 three year grant to suppress gang activities in youth; and WHEREAS, the application materials outlined the proposal for use of the money—to fund three education advocates to be hired by ESD 105 and operate the Yakima Youth Leadership Program in each of the four Yakima School District middle schools—the budget and the responsibilities of partner agencies (Yakima School District and ESD 105); and WHEREAS, the City of Yakima was awarded a Youth Gang Suppression grant on September 26, 2019, subject to acceptance of the grant assurances; and WHEREAS, the City Council must accept the grant assurances and requirements of the grant before the award can be accepted by the City and the program can move forward upon funding becoming available; and WHEREAS, the City Council finds that it is in the best interests of the City of Yakima and its residents to accept the Youth Gang Suppression Implementation Grant, the grant assurances and conditions, and implement the program outlined in the grant application; now, therefore BE IT RESOLVED BY THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF YAKIMA: The City Council of the City of Yakima hereby accepts Grant GMS Award 2019-PB-BX- 0017—Youth Gang Suppression and Implementation Grant—as awarded and authorizes the City Manager, or their designee, to execute the necessary grant assurances and any other necessary documents to accept the award and funds. ADOPTED BY THE CITY COUNCIL this 5'h day of November, 2019. ATTEST: Kathy Coffey, Mayor Sonya Clear Tee, City Clerk 4 MEMORANDUM TO: Honorable Mayor Coffey and City Councilmembers FROM: Sara Watkins, Senior Assistant City Attorney DATE: October 8, 2019 SUBJ: OJJDP Grant Awarded for GRIT Yakima Youth Leadership Program Dear Mayor and Councilmembers, As you are aware, the City applied for a federal OJJDP grant for Youth Gang Suppression programs. A limited number of those grants were available nationwide. Yakima was awarded one of those grants for its Youth Leadership Program for sixth graders—the program the City piloted with ESD 105, Yakima School District and Gary Garza in Lewis & Clark and Franklin Middle Schools in the spring. The grant is for a total of$230,000 over the course of three years. As part of the grant application, the City, working with Matt Fairbank, city staff, ESD 105 and the Yakima School District, formulated a plan wherein each entity is tasked with certain requirements to ensure that the program can function effectively, as well as ensure that the overall GRIT Village and Steering Committee work continues. Each of the elements—the Village, Steering Committee, and Leadership Program—are important to the other elements and create a community-based program that benefits Yakima's youth. This memo provides a summary of the proposed program that was approved by OJJDP. If you choose to accept the grant money, the program must be followed as proposed in the grant application. The grant narrative and budget, as well as the letters of intent with ESD and YSD, are attached for your review. The grant money can only be spent as outlined in those documents and the City would be required to follow all grant assurances and requirements. 1 . Summary of the program The three primary elements of the overall program are: 1 . Yakima Youth Leadership Program for up to 30 students at a time across all four Yakima School District middle schools with the anticipation that approximately 75 students will be served each year. a. Entrance and exit criteria to allow for fluid program participants b. Personalized coaching for youth and their families who participate in the program 5 c. Monitoring of behavioral issues, grades, attendance, contact with law enforcement and other matters as appropriate d. Connecting youth to services such as tutoring, after school activities, sports, mental health, medical, and other community resources e. Assistance for families in connecting with community resources f. Connection to volunteer mentors through other existing mentorship programs in Yakima g. Parent coaching and help, as well as help with accessing community services 2. 6th Grade Student and Parent Education a. Connecting with all 6th graders about gang awareness, resilience, hope, opportunities, conflict resolution or other pertinent topics to be determined jointly with the Yakima Youth Leadership Program coordinator and the Yakima School District. This could be through an assembly or series of assemblies, or in-class time depending on what is deemed appropriate by the YSD. b. Connecting with all parents of 6th graders through an educational seminar or seminars discussing similar topics, as well as adverse childhood impacts, community services available, and parent rights. At such a seminar there could also be a services fair where service providers can provide handouts or sign up families and/or youth for services or after school programming. Seminars would need to include a meal and child care for higher attendance. 3. Community-wide collaboration through the GRIT Village a. Continue Village meetings and collaboration with meetings still held every other month b. Monthly Steering Committee meetings to discuss long-term strategies and capacity. c. Provide support for the efforts listed in (1) and (2) above. The proposed program is a partnership among the City, ESD and YSD, with each entity required to take on certain tasks as follows: a. The City The City agrees to repurpose one position in the police department, temporarily during the grant period of three years, to become the Program Coordinator. That person will provide support services to the GRIT Steering Committee; convene the GRIT Village meetings; foster partnerships and collaborations between stakeholders, ESD, YSD, and the community; guide the Village to identify gaps in services and barriers; and work collaboratively to address those gaps and barriers. The Program Coordinator will also guide the evaluation efforts in conjunction with ESD and YSD and the program evaluator. 6 As such, the City is responsible for hiring a Program Coordinator, continuing facilitation of the Village and Steering Committee meetings, and the evaluation of the Program. b. The YSD The YSD agrees to allow the coaches and Program Coordinator access to students involved in the program during the school day. YSD also agrees to provide space for at least one all-6th grade assembly at least once per year focusing on a pertinent topic associated with good decision making and/or staying out of gangs or away from gang violence. The Program Coordinator and YSD will confer on an appropriate topic for the assembly. YSD is responsible for all costs associated with the assembly. YSD will also provide space for a 6th grade parent/family/guardian education presentation, likely in the evening or on a weekend, which includes providing child care and a meal. The topics will be coordinated with the Program Coordinator and YSD will be responsible for the costs. It is anticipated that there will also be a "services fair" or other opportunity for stakeholders and service providers to have tables with information for attendees. Finally, YSD agrees to help train, where appropriate, the program coaches at no cost, and designate a specific person to be a liaison with the Program Coordinator at each of the four middle schools. c. ESD 105 ESD 105 will hire three (3) part time education advocates to serve as coaches to the YYLP, and those coaches will be housed at ESD 105 (although the majority of their work will be at the schools). Education advocates will be able to use space at the Open Doors facility as available as well. ESD 105 will provide computers, cell phones and tech support and provide training for the education advocates. Education advocates will also be allowed to attend all relevant trainings offered by ESD. YSD will participate in the hiring process of the education advocates. ESD 105 will be paid out of the grant the costs of the education advocates and a discounted indirect cost rate already agreed to as part of the grant budget. 2. Grant Assurances The City must agree to the Grant Assurances requirements associated with this grant. Those are as follows: A. General Grant Assurances U.S. DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CERTIFIED STANDARD ASSURANCES On behalf of the Applicant, and in support of this application for a grant or cooperative agreement, I certify under penalty of perjury to the U.S. Department of Justice ("Department"), that all of the following are true and correct: 7 (1) I have the authority to make the following representations on behalf of myself and the Applicant. I understand that these representations will be relied upon as material in any Department decision to make an award to the Applicant based on its application. (2) I certify that the Applicant has the legal authority to apply for the federal assistance sought by the application, and that it has the institutional, managerial, and financial capability (including funds sufficient to pay any required non-federal share of project costs) to plan, manage, and complete the project described in the application properly. (3) I assure that, throughout the period of performance for the award (if any) made by the Department based on the application-- a. the Applicant will comply with all award requirements and all federal statutes and regulations applicable to the award; b. the Applicant will require all subrecipients to comply with all applicable award requirements and all applicable federal statutes and regulations; and c. the Applicant will maintain safeguards to address and prevent any organizational conflict of interest, and also to prohibit employees from using their positions in any manner that poses, or appears to pose, a personal or financial conflict of interest. (4) The Applicant understands that the federal statutes and regulations applicable to the award (if any) made by the Department based on the application specifically include statutes and regulations pertaining to civil rights and nondiscrimination, and, in addition-- a. the Applicant understands that the applicable statutes pertaining to civil rights will include section 601 of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C. §2000d); section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (29 U.S.C. §794); section 901 of the Education Amendments of 1972 (20 U.S.C. § 1681); and section 303 of the Age Discrimination Act of 1975 (42 U.S.C. §6102); b. the Applicant understands that the applicable statutes pertaining to nondiscrimination may include section 809(c) of Title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (34 U.S.C. § 10228(c)); section 1407(e) of the Victims of Crime Act of 1984 (34 U.S.C. §20110(e)); section 299A(b) of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 2002 (34 U.S.C. § 11182(b)); and that the grant condition set out at section 40002(b)(13) of the Violence Against Women Act (34 U.S.C. § 12291(b)(13)), which will apply to all awards made by the Office on Violence Against Women, also may apply to an award made otherwise; c. the Applicant understands that it must require any subrecipient to comply with all such applicable statutes (and associated regulations); and d. on behalf of the Applicant, I make the specific assurances set out in 28 C.F.R. §§42.105 and 42.204. (5) The Applicant also understands that (in addition to any applicable program-specific regulations and to applicable federal regulations that pertain to civil rights and nondiscrimination) the federal regulations applicable to the award (if any) made by the Department based on the application may include, but are not limited to, 2 C.F.R. Part 2800 (the DOJ "Part 200 Uniform Requirements") and 28 C.F.R. Parts 22 (confidentiality- research and statistical information), 23 (criminal intelligence systems), 38 (regarding faith-based or religious organizations participating in federal financial assistance programs), and 46 (human subjects protection). (6) I assure that the Applicant will assist the Department as necessary (and will require subrecipients and contractors to assist as necessary) with the Department's compliance with section 106 of the National 8 Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (54 U.S.C. § 306108), the Archeological and Historical Preservation Act of 1974 (54 U.S.C. §§312501-312508), and the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (42 U.S.C. §§ 4321-4335), and 28 C.F.R. Parts 61 (NEPA) and 63 (floodplains and wetlands). (7) I assure that the Applicant will give the Department and the Government Accountability Office, through any authorized representative, access to, and opportunity to examine, all paper or electronic records related to the award (if any) made by the Department based on the application. (8) I assure that, if the Applicant is a governmental entity, with respect to the award (if any) made by the Department based on the application-- a. it will comply with the requirements of the Uniform Relocation Assistance and Real Property Acquisitions Act of 1970 (42 U.S.C. §§4601-4655), which govern the treatment of persons displaced as a result of federal and federally-assisted programs; and b. it will comply with requirements of 5 U.S.C. §§ 1501-1508 and 7324-7328, which limit certain political activities of State or local government employees whose principal employment is in connection with an activity financed in whole or in part by federal assistance. (9) If the Applicant applies for and receives an award from the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS Office), I assure that as required by 34 U.S.C. § 10382(c)(11), it will, to the extent practicable and consistent with applicable law--including, but not limited to, the Indian Self- Determination and Education Assistance Act--seek, recruit, and hire qualified members of racial and ethnic minority groups and qualified women in order to further effective law enforcement by increasing their ranks within the sworn positions, as provided under 34 U.S.C. § 10382(c)(11). (10) If the Applicant applies for and receives a DOJ award under the STOP School Violence Act program, I assure as required by 34 U.S.C. § 10552(a)(3), that it will maintain and report such data, records, and information (programmatic and financial) as DOJ may reasonably require. I acknowledge that a materially false, fictitious, or fraudulent statement (or concealment or omission of a material fact) in this certification, or in the application that it supports, may be the subject of criminal prosecution (including under 18 U.S.C. §§ 1001 and/or 1621, and/or 34 U.S.C. §§ 10271-10273), and also may subject me and the Applicant to civil penalties and administrative remedies for false claims or otherwise (including under 31 U.S.C. §§ 3729-3730 and 3801-3812). I also acknowledge that the Department's awards, including certifications provided in connection with such awards, are subject to review by the Department, including by its Office of the Inspector General. B. General Certifications U.S. DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CERTIFICATIONS REGARDING LOBBYING; DEBARMENT, SUSPENSION AND OTHER RESPONSIBILITY MATTERS; AND DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE REQUIREMENTS Applicants should refer to the regulations cited below to determine the certification to which they are required to attest. Applicants should also review the instructions for certification included in the regulations before completing this form. The certifications shall be treated as a material representation of fad upon which reliance will be placed when the U.S. Department of Justice ("Department") determines to award the covered transaction, grant, or cooperative agreement. 1. LOBBYING As required by 31 U.S.C. § 1352, as implemented by 28 C.F.R. Part 69, the Applicant certifies and assures (to the extent applicable)the following: 9 (a) No Federal appropriated funds have been paid or will be paid, by or on behalf of the Applicant, to any person for influencing or attempting to influence an officer or employee of any agency, a Member of Congress, an officer or employee of Congress, or an employee of a Member of Congress in connection with the making of any Federal grant,the entering into of any cooperative agreement, or the extension, continuation, renewal, amendment, or modification of any Federal grant or cooperative agreement; (b) If the Applicant's request for Federal funds is in excess of$100,000, and any funds other than Federal appropriated funds have been paid or will be paid to any person for influencing or attempting to influence an officer or employee of any agency, a member of Congress, an officer or employee of Congress, or an employee of a member of Congress in connection with this Federal grant or cooperative agreement,the Applicant shall complete and submit Standard Form - LLL, "Disclosure of Lobbying Activities" in accordance with its (and any DOJ awarding agency's) instructions; and (c) The Applicant shall require that the language of this certification be included in the award documents for all subgrants and procurement contracts (and their subcontracts)funded with Federal award funds and shall ensure that any certifications or lobbying disclosures required of recipients of such subgrants and procurement contracts (or their subcontractors) are made and filed in accordance with 31 U.S.C. § 1352. 2. DEBARMENT, SUSPENSION, AND OTHER RESPONSIBILITY MATTERS A. Pursuant to Department regulations on nonprocurement debarment and suspension implemented at 2 C.F.R. Part 2867, and to other related requirements,the Applicant certifies,with respect to prospective participants in a primary tier"covered transaction", as defined at 2 C.F.R. § 2867.20(a),that neither it nor any of its principals-- (a) is presently debarred, suspended, proposed for debarment, declared ineligible, sentenced to a denial of Federal benefits by a State or Federal court, or voluntarily excluded from covered transactions by any Federal department or agency; (b) has within a three-year period preceding this application been convicted of a felony criminal violation under any Federal law, or been convicted or had a civil judgment rendered against it for commission of fraud or a criminal offense in connection with obtaining, attempting to obtain, or performing a public(Federal, State,tribal, or local)transaction or private agreement or transaction; (c) is presently indicted for or otherwise criminally or civilly charged by a governmental entity (Federal, State, tribal, or local)with commission of any of the offenses enumerated in paragraph (b) of this certification; and/or (d) has within a three-year period preceding this application had one or more public transactions (Federal, State, tribal, or local)terminated for cause or default. B.Where the Applicant is unable to certify to any of the statements in this certification, it shall attach an explanation to this application. Where the Applicant or any of its principals was convicted,within a three-year period preceding this application, of a felony criminal violation under any Federal law,the Applicant also must disclose such felony criminal conviction in writing to the Department(for OJP Applicants, to OJP at Ojpcompliancereporting@usdoj.gov; for OVW Applicants,to OVW at OVW.GFMD@usdoj.gov; or for COPS Applicants, to COPS at AskCOPSRC@usdoj.gov), unless such disclosure has already been made. 3. FEDERAL TAXES A. If the Applicant is a corporation, it certifies either that(1)the corporation has no unpaid Federal tax liability that has been assessed,for which all judicial and administrative remedies have been 10 exhausted or have lapsed,that is not being paid in a timely manner pursuant to an agreement with the authority responsible for collecting the tax liability, or(2)the corporation has provided written notice of such an unpaid tax liability(or liabilities)to the Department(for OJP Applicants, to OJP at Ojpcompliancereporting@usdoj.gov; for OVW Applicants, to OVW at OVW.GFMD@usdoj.gov; or for COPS Applicants, to COPS at AskCOPSRC@usdoj.gov). B.Where the Applicant is unable to certify to any of the statements in this certification, it shall attach an explanation to this application. 4. DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE(GRANTEES OTHER THAN INDIVIDUALS) As required by the Drug-Free Workplace Ad of 1988, as implemented at 28 C.F.R. Part 83, Subpart F,for grantees, as defined at 28 C.F.R. §§83.620 and 83.650: A. The Applicant certifies and assures that it will, or will continue to, provide a drug-free workplace by-- (a) Publishing a statement notifying employees that the unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensing, possession, or use of a controlled substance is prohibited in its workplace and specifying the actions that will be taken against employees for violation of such prohibition; (b) Establishing an on-going drug-free awareness program to inform employees about-- (1) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (2) The Applicant's policy of maintaining a drug-free workplace; (3)Any available drug counseling, rehabilitation, and employee assistance programs; and (4) The penalties that may be imposed upon employees for drug abuse violations occurring in the workplace; (c) Making it a requirement that each employee to be engaged in the performance of the award be given a copy of the statement required by paragraph (a); (d) Notifying the employee in the statement required by paragraph (a)that, as a condition of employment under the award,the employee will-- (1)Abide by the terms of the statement; and (2) Notify the employer in writing of the employee's conviction for a violation of a criminal drug statute occurring in the workplace no later than five calendar days after such conviction; (e) Notifying the Department, in writing, within 10 calendar days after receiving notice under subparagraph (d)(2)from an employee or otherwise receiving actual notice of such conviction. Employers of convicted employees must provide notice, including position title of any such convicted employee to the Department, as follows: For COPS award recipients -COPS Office, 145 N Street, NE,Washington, DC, 20530; For OJP and OVW award recipients - U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, ATTN: Control Desk, 810 7th Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20531. Notice shall include the identification number(s) of each affected award; (f)Taking one of the following actions,within 30 calendar days of receiving notice under subparagraph (d)(2), with respect to any employee who is so convicted: 11 (1) Taking appropriate personnel action against such an employee, up to and including termination, consistent with the requirements of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended; or (2) Requiring such employee to participate satisfactorily in a drug abuse assistance or rehabilitation program approved for such purposes by a Federal, State, or local health, law enforcement, or other appropriate agency; and (g) Making a good faith effort to continue to maintain a drug-free workplace through implementation of paragraphs (a), (b), (c), (d), (e), and (f). 5. COORDINATION REQUIRED UNDER PUBLIC SAFETY AND COMMUNITY POLICING PROGRAMS As required by the Public Safety Partnership and Community Policing Ad of 1994, at 34 U.S.C. § 10382(c)(5), if this application is for a COPS award, the Applicant certifies that there has been appropriate coordination with all agencies that may be affected by its award.Affected agencies may include, among others, Offices of the United States Attorneys; State, local, or tribal prosecutors; or correctional agencies. I acknowledge that a materially false,fictitious, or fraudulent statement(or concealment or omission of a material fad) in this certification, or in the application that it supports, may be the subject of criminal prosecution (including under 18 U.S.C. §§ 1001 and/or 1621, and/or 34 U.S.C. §§ 10271-10273), and also may subject me and the Applicant to civil penalties and administrative remedies for false claims or otherwise(including under 31 U.S.C. §§3729-3730 and 3801-3812). I also acknowledge that the Department's awards, including certifications provided in connection with such awards, are subject to review by the Department, including by its Office of the Inspector General. C. Specific Certifications The Grant Agreement required that those entities awarded grants also provide certification that the awardee would comply with 8 U.S.C. section 1373: (a) In general Notwithstanding any other provision of Federal, State, or local law, a Federal, State, or local government entity or official may not prohibit, or in any way restrict, any government entity or official from sending to, or receiving from, the Immigration and Naturalization Service information regarding the citizenship or immigration status, lawful or unlawful, of any individual. (b) Additional authority of government entities Notwithstanding any other provision of Federal, State, or local law, no person or agency may prohibit, or in any way restrict, a Federal, State, or local government entity from doing any of the following with respect to information regarding the immigration status, lawful or unlawful, of any individual: (1) Sending such information to, or requesting or receiving such information from, the Immigration and Naturalization Service. (2) Maintaining such information. (3) Exchanging such information with any other Federal, State, or local government entity. (c) Obligation to respond to inquiries The Immigration and Naturalization Service shall respond to an inquiry by a Federal, State, or local government agency, seeking to verify or ascertain the citizenship or 12 immigration status of any individual within the jurisdiction of the agency for any purpose authorized by law, by providing the requested verification or status information. The grant application requirements also referenced that awardees certify that they will comply with 8 U.S.C. section 1644: Notwithstanding any other provision of Federal, State, or local law, no State or local government entity may be prohibited, or in any way restricted, from sending to or receiving from the Immigration and Naturalization Service information regarding the immigration status, lawful or unlawful, of an alien in the United States. The grant states that if an applicant did not provide such certification at the time of the grant application that any award of funds would be contingent on the awardee providing the certification, and no funds would be provided until said certification is provided. The City did not provide the certification at the time of grant application. Any certification provided by the City would include the restrictions provided for in the Washington State Keep Washington Working Act which provides some restrictions in this area. That Act requires school districts adopt certain model rules, formulated by the attorney general, in the future. However, the KWWA requires that municipalities comply with 8 USC 1373 in Section 8, which states that nothing in the act is intended to limit or prohibit any local agency from complying with 8 USC 1373 or any other state or federal law. If the grant is approved by the Council, the City will provide the certification required when requested by OJJDP to receive the funding. 13 City of Yakima OJJ DP Gang Suppression Project Narrative A. Statement of the Problem The Gang Reduction Intervention Taskforce is based in Yakima, WA. The City of Yakima, located in South Central Washington, is the 11th largest city in the state with 93,000 residents.' Its economy is based on it being the largest city in South Central Washington and Yakima County which has significant agricultural productivity and is a service industry hub for the surrounding area. The agricultural industry has depended on having a low wage worker pool to tend and harvest crops. Apples and other tree fruit, Dairy, hops, and vegetables are the primary agricultural products of the County. The population in the county is 49.4% Latino, 43%non- Latino Caucasian, 5.5% African American, Native American and Asian and Pacific Islander and 2.1% of two or more races. The city is ranked 15th in per household income of the top 15 cities in WA state.3 Yakima School District has 72% of its students who qualify for free and reduced meals. The Yakima School District is 78% Latino, 17.3% White, 2.5% Two or more races, American Indian .9%, African American, .8% and Asian and Pacific Islander .5%.4 In a recent group audit commissioned by Project Safe Neighborhoods for the Eastern District of Washington, the Eastern District of Washington was ranked third in the U.S. Probation's Risk Index of all US Attorney Office regions in the United States. Within that District,the Project Safe Neighborhoods has chosen to focus its efforts solely on Yakima and Yakima County due to the high rate of gangs and gang violence here. 'Washington Cities by Population https:jjwww.washington-demographics.comjcities by population 2 Yakima County Trends. Non-white Population as a Share of Total Population, http:fJyakimavalleytrends.orgJgraph.cfm?cat 1d=08:sub cat id=38kind id=4 Wikipedia,Washington Places Ranked by Ranked by Per Capita Income. https:jjen.wikipedia.orgjwiki/List of Washington locations by per capita income °Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction, WA State Report Card,Yakima School District http.jjreportca rd.osp i.k12.wa.us jsu m ma ry.aspx?schoo I Id=294&yea r=2016-17&reportLevel=District Page 1 of 23 14 City of Yakima OJJDP Gang Suppression Project Narrative Yakima County has the third highest level of gang activity, even though it is only the eighth most populous county in the state. This level is the highest of all counties in the Eastern District of Washington.5 In the Project Safe Neighborhoods group assessment,it was noted that there are 26 street gangs in Yakima, with an estimated 1,300 members and associates. That is a rate of 1.4 percent of the city's population. Of the 27 gangs present in Yakima County, 93% are rated as either extremely or somewhat violent and 89% are rated as highly or somewhat organized6 In the first four months of 2019, three teenagers were shot to death in gang violence in Yakima and the nearby town of Wapato. All three were 16 years old or younger. An adult aunt of one of the victims was seriously injured but is recovering. The shooters in two of the murders who have been apprehended are both teenagers. Six of the nine homicides committed in the first 4 months of 2019 in Yakima County had a gang connection.. The City of Yakima has been working to address gang violence at multiple times since gang presence and gang violence came to the fore during the 1990s with the growth of the crack epidemic. Yakima was a major distribution point for crack cocaine for the Northwestern United States and Western Canada. In 2011 and 2012 the City of Yakima and Yakima County conducted community assessments as per the OJJDP Comprehensive Gang Model. The Yakima County Gang Assessment was initiated by the Yakima County Gang Commission and followed the protocol outlined by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP)'s Comprehensive Gang Model. Additional data was included from Yakima County Local Indicators for Excellence (YC-LIFE) Yakima County Annual Report s Project Safe Neighborhoods Yakima Police Department Group Audit, draft form as of June 1, 2019. 6 Project Safe Neighborhoods Yakima Police Department Group Audit, draft form as of June 1, 2019. 'Yakima Herald Republic April 29, 2019 article. https:ffwww.yakimaherald.comfnewsfcrime and courtsjgang- activity-increases-every-spring-in-the-Yakima-valley-policejarticle 6ae2ba54-bdcb-58b0-aeaf-4289406e6041.html Page 2 of 23 15 City of Yakima OJJDP Gang Suppression Project Narrative 2012 released in March 2012. This assessment included a review of community demographic and perception data, law enforcement data, and student/educational data for the presence of various risk factors as identified by the OJJDP Gang Model. There are 49 risk factors in all;the OJJDP Model Guide states the greater the number of risk factors experienced by the youth, the greater the likelihood of gang involvement. Key Findings Key findings were developed from a review of the data for risk factors for gang involvement with comparisons made with Washington State as a whole when possible. 1. Yakima County has an environment that contains multiple risk factors for gang involvement including a culture of poverty which is magnified by single parenting, low adult educational attainment, and high seasonal unemployment rates. The presence of these factors varies widely amongst communities within the County. 2. Yakima County has a high rate of at-risk youth with multiple risk factors for gang involvement including higher rates of school failure, a high teen birth rate, suicide and suicide attempts, depression, illegal drug use, alcohol use, and low neighborhood attachment. Students also report feeling less safe in school. 3. Yakima County contains a multitude of micro cultures among segments of the population as illustrated by the wide disparities in race and ethnicity, income, crime, and educational attainment. This is further evidenced by undercurrents of conflict related to those differences as demonstrated in the survey responses. 4. A lack of common definitions and criteria for Gang Membership and Gang Activity made the analysis of Gang Crime difficult. Additionally, the old system for tracking law enforcement activity called for individual assessments of incident Page 3 of 23 16 City of Yakima OJJDP Gang Suppression Project Narrative reports, this and the absence of a dedicated Crime Analyst has also been a challenge in assessing past crime activity. Moving forward, law enforcement agencies have taken a new step in cooperation to keep track of law enforcement data which will help track gang activity in the future by implementing a single system for records management. The City of Yakima also recently hired a Crime and Intelligence Analyst to assist in the investigations of crimes, including gang violence and crime. City of Yakima Gang Free Initiative In response to concerns about the chronic presence of gangs and gang crime in our community, in November 2009, the Yakima City Council, directed City Staff to develop a framework for the implementation of a City of Yakima Gang Free Initiative. The vision of the City of Yakima Gang Free Initiative was to create a safe, peaceful, gang-free community resulting in a high quality of life for families. Their mission was to engage the community to develop suppression, prevention and intervention strategies that support and promote positive youth development. In 2011 they released the 2011 City of Yakima Community Profile for the benefit of key community stakeholders, policymakers and service providers. This profile presents data and analysis to support the development of a city-wide anti-gang approach to reducing juvenile crime and violence in the city of Yakima. The 2011 City of Yakima Community Profile was in line with the efforts of the Yakima County Gang Commission Assessment. Even though both assessments were similar in many ways and both used guidance from the OJJDP Comprehensive Gang Assessment model,they differed regarding their intended audience and outcome. The Present: 2014--2019. Page 4 of 23 17 City of Yakima OJJ DP Gang Suppression Project Narrative In 2014, the City conducted a livability survey which asked specific questions about safety and crime. In the first nine months of 2017 there were eleven homicides in Yakima.8 Three of those homicides were determined to be gang related. An additional three of them may have been gang related but officers lacked sufficient evidence to make that determination. One other homicide occurred in a neighborhood known for gang violence, but the victim was not gang related. In one of the gang related shootings, a fourteen year old male was killed as part of a drive-by shooting. This gang violence spurred the City Council to start a series of neighborhood forums about gang and gun violence in Yakima. Between 2017 and 2018, a total of ten public forums took place throughout the City including two in Spanish. These efforts concluded with the Vision 2025 Community Wellness Plan, which addressed community health from three perspectives: Youth development; Domestic violence; and Neighborhood safety. In addition, in May 2018 Opportunities Industrialization Center of WA(OIC) and NAACP hosted a regional dialogue for youth to discuss violence. The City will leverage any and all current discussions where we can understand diverse perspectives and incorporate messages in our program design.' Based on feedback provided by community residents to listening sessions conducted by the Yakima City Council in 2017, youth and gang violence ranked as one of their top concerns10. The outcry over the violence prompted Washington Governor Jay Inslee to visit Yakima to meet with community residents and leaders in October 2017.11 Over 100 people attended the meeting. A statewide summit on gangs and youth violence was held in November 2017. Out of these efforts came a grant from the Governor's office to the City of e https://www.vakimaherald.com/newsJ9ang-violence-solutions-hobbled-by-scant- resources/article 5ecc38d6-aa50-11e7-9fd5-ffd1968673c9.html 9 Now is the Time II, City of Yakima Community Health and Safety Plan Vision 2025, pages 4-6 io "https://www.yakimaherald.comjnewsjgang-violence-solutions-hobbled-by-scant- resources/article 5ecc38d6-aa50-11e7-9fd5-ffd1968673c9.html Page 5 of 23 18 City of Yakima OJJ DP Gang Suppression Project Narrative Yakima to develop a sustainable approach to addressing gang violence and youth involvement in gangs. This grant for a total of$150,000 was given for the state fiscal year from July 1, 2018 to June 30, 2019.12 With the receipt of the grant, the City of Yakima began using the structure outlined in the Comprehensive Gang Model. This has included: • Convening a steering committee of key decision makers which meets monthly. • Bringing together service providers and concerned community residents to share resources, make connections and look at service gaps and how to fill them. This group called the Gang Reduction Intervention Taskforce (GRIT) Village has met every two months. • Developing a small pilot program, dubbed the Yakima Youth Leadership Program, as our service delivery component. It provides coaching/mentoring to select 61h grade students in the Yakima School District and their parents/guardians. The youth are identified by the school as either being in a gang or at clear risk of joining one. The design of this program, including the student age group to be reached, was determined by the GRIT Village. • Conducting a community education campaign with hour long interviews on KDNA, the local Spanish Language public radio station, and short interviews and advertisements on three English Language radio stations in Yakima. 12htt ps://www.ofm.wa.gov/sites/default/files/pu bI is/budget/state budget/18supp/recsu m/2018Su pple mentalRecSums.pdf Page 6 of 23 19 City of Yakima OJJDP Gang Suppression Project Narrative • Evaluating the effectiveness and impact of the grant program's components. The evaluation is not yet ready at this time, but will be submitted to the State of Washington by July 15, 2019. It will be available for sharing with OJJDP at that time. Through the work we have done thus far under our current state grant, we clearly see the value of continuing to implement the comprehensive gang model complete with continued Gang Reduction Intervention Taskforce Steering Committee and Village meetings and to expand the Yakima Youth Leadership Program to all four Yakima School District Middle Schools and all the youth who could benefit from the program. B. Program Design and Implementation: Goals, Objectives and Performance Measures Our goals under the City of Yakima's Gang Suppression Grant are: A. Identify and address service gaps and barriers, and create a blueprint for a comprehensive network of services for youth at risk of becoming gang involved or continuing in the gang lifestyle. B. Reduce the impact of violence on youth by improving identification, screening, access, delivery and quality of services available to youth exposed to gang-related violence in an attempt to prevent them from joining a gang or becoming victimized by a gang. C. Reduce and sustain reductions in community youth violence, particularly gun and gang violence and victimization. Objectives for accomplishing these goals include: 1. To reduce significantly the number of Yakima School District sixth graders during the 2019-20 and 2020-21 school years who join gangs during the Yakima Youth Leadership Program's existence with a longer-term objective of reducing significantly the number of youth in this age cohort who become involved in gangs throughout their lives. Page 7 of 23 20 City of Yakima OJJ DP Gang Suppression Project Narrative 2. To increase instruction time of students in the Yakima Youth Leadership Program and reduce their disciplinary issues. 3. To help students participating in the Yakima Youth Leadership Program increase their level of school engagement, attendance and desire to learn. 4. To help students who participate in the program to become more resilient and thus less likely to join gangs by teaching them leadership skills, and teaching and fostering hope in them which propels them to positive, productive futures. 5. To provide opportunities for youth who have completed and begun to practice their newfound leadership skills to move into a leadership role in the Yakima Youth Leadership Program by referring other students to it, helping Education Advocates when they hold YYLP group events and moving into leadership roles in school. 6. To match youth who participate in the program with mentors through existing and newly created mentoring programs with long term mentor/mentee matches. 7. To refer and help connect parents/guardians of participating youth to needed/requested community resources to help the families meet basic needs and promote resilience. 8. To reduce youth gang violence by starving the gangs of new, young recruits. 9. To continue convening service providers and concerned individuals as the Gang Reduction Intervention Taskforce (GRIT) Village to identify service gaps and barriers and work to fill those gaps with new services and reduce barriers to service access. 10. To grow the partnerships and collaborative efforts between service providers in the GRIT Village. Page 8 of 23 21 City of Yakima OJJ DP Gang Suppression Project Narrative 11. To create partnerships with service clubs and other groups to increase significantly the number of mentors who are available to work with Yakima Youth Leadership Program youth. 12. To expand the membership of the Gang Reduction Intervention Taskforce Steering Committee to enlist the participation of leaders in key community sectors that are part of this body. It is tasked with providing direction, changing policies within its member agencies, governmental entities which will positively affect the availability of services, reduction in service barriers and create a community culture that generate and supports hopeful and resilient youth. Performance Measures for these goals and objectives. Objective 1: Reduce the number of YSD 6th graders joining gangs. • Count the number of Yakima School District Middle School students wearing gang colors, sporting hair styles associated with gang life, displaying gang signs at school at 3 points during each of the school years covered in this program. • Measure the attitudes towards gangs of program participants at the beginning of their participation in Yakima Youth Leadership Program and at the end of it via surveys/interviews. Objective 2: Increase instructional time and reduce disciplinary issues of YYLP students. • Reduce the number of missed school days and tardiness levels of students participating in the Yakima Youth Leadership program. • Reduce the number of discipline incidents for students in the program. Objective 3: Increase YYLP students' school engagement and desire to learn. Page 9 of 23 22 City of Yakima OJJ DP Gang Suppression Project Narrative • Increase the completion rate for homework and other school projects for youth in the Yakima Youth Leadership Program. • Increase the number of youth who report being happy at school and liking school via pre and post program participation surveys/interviews. Objective 4: Help YYLP students become more resilient. • Measure the participating youths' awareness and utilization of leadership skills including verbal and non-verbal communications skills, awareness of the risk of social media causing upset, disrespect and isolation, bullying and its impact on others/self, risks of drug and alcohol use, knowledge of what gang life is really like and the risks associated with it, conflict resolution and self-regulations skills. This will be done via interviews and the end of program participation. • Measure the participating youths' hopefulness for their future by interviewing them about their vision for their future in the areas of home and family, education and career, hobbies and recreation and community/service utilizing the model of Kids at Hope time travel. 13 Objective 5: Provide YYLP students with leadership opportunities. • Record and count number of YYLP student referrals of other students to the program, YYLP students' participation in leadership role at YYLP group events, YYLP students' stepping up to leadership roles in broader school environment. Objective 6: Match YYLP students with mentors. • Measure the number of Yakima Youth Leadership Program youth who have mentor matches at the beginning and end of their program participation. Objective 7: Refer and help parents/guardians connect to needed community resources. 13 Kids at Hope website. http://kidsathope.org/ Page 10 of 23 23 City of Yakima OJJ DP Gang Suppression Project Narrative • Measure the number of referrals made and successful connections facilitated. Objective 8: Reduce youth gang violence. • Work with the Yakima Police Department Crime Statisticians to measure the incidence of gang related crime and violent crime over the course of the 36 month period of the grant. Objective 9: Convene GRIT Village. • Report on the frequency of GRIT Village meetings, identification of service gaps and barriers and what steps have been taken to fill those gaps and reduce barriers. Objective 10: Grow GRIT Village partnerships and collaborations. • Using surveys at three points during the grant period (first month, ninth month and eighteenth month)to measure the current and planned partnerships and collaborations between GRIT Village participants. Objective 11: Increase available mentors to serve YYLP youth and others. • Measure the number of participating youth who have been matched with mentors. Measure the number of mentors participating in youth mentoring programs in Yakima at two points during the grant period. Objective 12: Expand Members of GRIT Steering Committee. • Report on the membership of the Gang Reduction Intervention Taskforce steering committee including number of members and their sector affiliations. A descriptive plan for the Components of the City of Yakima Gang Reduction Intervention Taskforce is provided below. The City of Yakima's Gang Suppression proposal includes the following components. 1. Continue the work of, and expand the membership of,the Gang Reduction Intervention Taskforce Steering Committee. Page 11 of 23 24 City of Yakima OJJ DP Gang Suppression Project Narrative 2. Continue convening the Gang Reduction Intervention Taskforce Village, the group of service providers, faith-based organizations, concerned community leaders and members to enhance connections and collaboration with each other, make referrals, identify service gaps and find or create resources to fill those gaps. 3. Continue and expand the Yakima Youth Leadership program to all four Yakima School District Middle Schools with a goal of working with 150 6th graders over the course of the grant's 36 months to prevent them from entering gangs or to move out of gangs they have already entered. We will also hold assemblies for sixth graders in all four Yakima School District middle schools to talk about gangs, the negative impact of gang life, Adverse Childhood Experiences and Resilience and community and school resources to strengthen resilience. Lastly, we will have annual parent forums on these same topics with resource fairs of school and community resources to help families address these challenges. Each of these elements is explained in more detail below. 1. The Gang Reduction Intervention Taskforce Steering Committee was convened in July 2018 with the beginning of the Washington State grant to the City of Yakima at which time the city adopted a Comprehensive Gang Model approach to addressing gang violence and youth involvement in gangs. The committee meets monthly to provide grant oversight and direction for the overall efforts to address gang violence and youth involvement in gangs as well as evaluation of the efforts. This work will continue as envisioned in the Comprehensive Gang Model. The committee's initial members included: • Three of the seven members of the Yakima City Council: Dulce Gutierrez, Brad Hill and Jason White. Page 12 of 23 25 City of Yakima OJJDP Gang Suppression Project Narrative • Yakima County Prosecutor: Joseph Brusic. • Yakima County Juvenile Court Administrator: Candi Shute • Yakima School District Superintendent: Jack Irion • Yakima Valley Farmworker's Clinic Director: Carlos Olivares. Mr. Olivares soon designated the Clinics' Senior Director of Planning and Development to take his place on the committee due to his busy schedule. Rodona Marquez. In April of 2019, the committee voted to expand its membership to include a law enforcement representative and a formerly gang involved individual. • The Chief of Police for the City of Yakima, Matt Murray joined the committee at its May meeting. • The committee has identified two former gang members who are working to help youth end their gang ties whom they have invited to join the committee. One has declined due to his busy schedule. The other has not given her response yet but is still in dialogue with the Gang Reduction Intervention Taskforce consultant about the invitation. The committee is considering adding representatives from additional sectors of the community including family support and case management, mental health, independent living skills, employment training and retention and faith and youth development. We will pursue this expansion of the steering committee as we move into the OJJDP Gang Suppression grant. 2. The Gang Reduction Intervention Taskforce Village has grown considerably since the first meeting of community leaders to address the gang violence and youth involvement in gangs which took place in January 2018. The data base of participants includes 181 individuals from 77 organizations and governmental agencies as well as unaffiliated volunteers and community Page 13 of 23 26 City of Yakima OJJ DP Gang Suppression Project Narrative members. There have been 113 different people participate in the four meetings held since November 2018 (during the time the city has had the grant from the state of Washington). Going forward, we will continue to convene the GRIT Village to share information about resources and approaches that help us address gang violence and youth involvement in gangs and to foster collaboration and connection between the various entities with a goal towards matching those with resources to those with needs including space, expertise, volunteers, knowledge and connections. 3. The Yakima Youth Leadership Program component of our efforts will include the following: A. Youth Mentoring/Coaching and family supports one hundred and fifty 6th graders (over the three years of the grant, 50 per year) identified by school staff as being in or on the cusp of entering gang lifestyle (approximately thirty youth will participate in the program at one time). The mentoring/coaching program will consist of • Education Advocates case managing and accompanying for the youth and families that would include the following items. o Two times weekly one-on-one conversations between youth and education advocate on the program's leadership skills curriculum and check in on progress towards goals. o Attendance, Grade & Behavior Challenges with rewards for completion. o Monitoring of grades and attendance on a weekly basis. o Connection to tutoring resources available at school when desired/requested by students/family/school. Page 14 of 23 27 City of Yakima OJJ DP Gang Suppression Project Narrative o Assistance connecting to community resources (referrals, accompaniment, check in, follow up). o Connection to volunteer mentors through existing, sanctioned mentoring programs in the community. o Development of partnership with youths' parents/guardians so that they all can be working on the same page with programmatic elements. o Parent coaching, weekly, on how to parent successfully a middle schooler who is on the cusp of gang involvement. o Helping parents access needed community resources for themselves and their families. • As a student's behavior, attendance and attitudes shift more positively they would receive a"warm"handoff to school counselors, coaches, School Resource Officers, an engaged parent or other natural support to continue their progress and another student would be given the slot in the program. Some students will likely need a longer intervention than others. Normal length of time actively in the program will likely be 12 to 16 weeks. The students who have "graduated" out of the program will continue to be monitored for progress towards their goals and in terms of school performance and behavior and supported by the education advocates who worked with them while in the program,just at a less intensive level. They will also be invited to move into a leadership role in the Yakima Youth Leadership Program. B. Yakima School District-wide Resources for Youth and Parents/Guardians Page 15 of 23 28 City of Yakima OJJ DP Gang Suppression Project Narrative • Annual assemblies on gang awareness for each of 4 middle school 6th grade cohorts with presentations from: o Former gang members on negative impacts on self, family, and loved ones of gang lifestyle. o Opportunities and motivational speakers that foster hope, goal setting and positive future outlook. o Education Advocates or other ESD 105 staff about Adverse Childhood Experience and Resilience and how to connect to school and community resources to build resilience for themselves and their children. o School counselors and other staff about resources available at school to address ACEs and foster resilience. • Annual parent information nights (or full day Saturdays)for parents/guardians of 6h graders with: o Food for full family and child care/fun and educational activities o Training for parents on: • Recognizing gang behaviors, dress, signs, • Drug use as a gateway to gang involvement, • ACEs and Resilience for self and children • Parent/students' rights and responsibilities regrading school discipline o Services fair with booths for all service provider/GRIT Village members The reasons we have chosen to focus our efforts on working with sixth graders is that most educators,juvenile justice representatives and community service providers have noted that at this point in the youths' lives, those children contemplating becoming part of a gang are not so Page 16 of 23 29 City of Yakima OJJ DP Gang Suppression Project Narrative far into the gang/street lifestyle that we can't successfully divert them from making that choice. With changes in the broader culture, youth unattachment to families and schools by late middle school age, the criminally active gang members are as young as 13 and 14. Many people are commenting that this age youth is even more prone to engaging in very violent acts that may or may not be directed by older gang leaders. The youth may just be reacting to slights, such as social media posts they perceive are disrespectful, without thinking about the consequences when they begin a fight or pick up a gun to threaten or shoot another youth. By focusing on 6th graders, we are hoping to direct them away from choosing a gang lifestyle before they are too deep into it and don't see a way out, and preventing them from committing criminal acts or becoming the victims of youth crime as a result of their gang involvement. The selection process for the youth will include having the Education Advocates work with school administrators, counselors, sixth grade teachers and school resource officers to identify students who have experienced: 1. Decline in school attendance and grades 2. Association with older students 3. Discipline involving drug use 4. Lack of interest in sports or after school/extracurricular activities 5. Documented gang behavior 6. Observed indicators of gang behavior (clothing, hair style, body language) 7. Generational gang influence (Parents/older siblings involved in gang life) The school staff will contact the parents of the identified youth to see if they would approve of their child participating in the program. If they respond affirmatively,the youths would each be invited to participate in the program by the Education Advocates. Page 17 of 23 30 City of Yakima OJJDP Gang Suppression Project Narrative The service area for this grant covers the Yakima School District Catchment Area, an area that used to match the city's boundaries. In the last 30 years the city's limits have expanded westward into formerly unincorporated areas of Yakima County. Those areas, even though in the city, are part of the West Valley School District. The Union Gap school district just to the south of the Yakima District only serves Kindergarten through 8th grade. Students in that district attend Yakima School District High Schools. The Yakima/Union Gap area has three designated Qualified Opportunity Zones. The map below shows the school district boundaries with the Qualified Opportunity Zones overlay. The Qualified Opportunity Zones and n..........w, mx ..... businesses within them will receive significant, positive impacts with the r:..... ` reduction in youth violence and youth ,..:. ;. I' ? rE?_• •�3• tt: r�F ...EAaai##IMF .�........ t# xtF v.. involvement in gangs that we •� x _:.::.. . anticipate with the successful ..Farf•;7•- aFx.�rF - x � ":m. _ xx�; €}s i7$ implementation of the Gang Reduction { Intervention Taskforce project. This .. .. will come in the form of safer streets, reduced property crime for the .�,:k .:v•�;aa.rr:::Fr:. businesses and residents in the zones, rikre.-,.',ar•,y..•=.,=.F:k Ui�Ik'+3..:}4r :rFg�.'.F:+•5 :•.G.i higher level of community cohesion as the fear of crime and gangs abates. As you can see, the opportunity zones (shaded in peach) encompass nearly the entire boundaries for Washington Middle School, and a good section of the boundary of Lewis & Clark Middle School. Franklin Middle School's boundaries also include a Page 18 of 23 31 City of Yakima OJJ DP Gang Suppression Project Narrative portion of an opportunity zones. Encouraging youth to attend class, get good grades, and become community leaders through the Yakima Youth Leadership Program will benefit the opportunity zones by providing good citizens, professional employers and employees, and the desire to invest in their community. Further, youth who are engaged in their schools and community create a safer neighborhood for residents of the Opportunity Zones. The goal of the YYLP is to have fewer children join gangs. If we decrease the pipeline into gang membership, gang size should age and ultimately shrink, causing less violence, crime and negativity in Opportunity Zones which, as is evidenced on the map, consists of a significant part of the east side of the City of Yakima. Overlaying this data with data regarding the gang activity within the City (see attachment of the gang audit conducted in May of 2019), you can see that the opportunity zones are also places with high gang activity. As a result, curbing gang entry by 6th graders will have beneficial effects on those opportunity zone neighborhoods, increasing public safety, decreasing crime, and creating more youth who are good neighbors and stewards of their communities. Page 19 of 23 City of Yakima OJJ DP Gang Suppression Project Narrative Risk and Protective Factors that inform our Logic Model (statistics from the 2016 WA State Healthy Youth Survey. http://www.askhys.net/): Community Domain Family Domain Risk Factors: Protective Factors: Risk Factors: Protective Factors: • Low level of attachment to • Active volunteers serving • Poor family management • Many parents are engaged in their neighborhood. youth in after school programs. (power dynamics due to their children's education and • High level of community • Churches adopting schools and immigration; limited parenting work hard to make extra disorganization members volunteering there. skills; parental absence; curricular resources available (unwillingness to cooperate • Active service club community addiction). to them. with police). focusing on youth (Kiwanis • Family conflict. • Many of the more traditional • Frequent transitions in clubs, Rotary clubs, Junior • In some families, parents Latino families in the area have residency in neighborhood. League). have favorable attitudes toward strong family linkages so if the • Legal marijuana use for over • Yakima Youth Awards anti-social behavior. children aren't rebelling they age of 21. annually honoring youth who • In some families, parents likely feel cared about and • Perceived ease of make a difference/are leaders. have favorable attitudes watched over(78% of the availability of firearms. • WA state laws on firearms are towards use of alcohol, tobacco Yakima School District's • Community norms favorable fairly restrictive. and drugs. student population are from to firearms. What is needed: • Some families have a history Latino backgrounds). • Limited opportunities for • High level of attachment in of anti-social behavior • Parents genuinely care for and pro-social involvement. neighborhood, as evidenced by including gang involvement. support their children. Red font items are not in neighbors knowing and • Low family attachment due to What is needed: Hawkins and Catalano List of spending time with neighbors, differing generational • Educational resources for community domain risk block watches, active expectations of immigrant parents guardians on effective factors. neighborhood groups. families, poor parenting skills, parenting, their rights to • High rate of racism and • Stronger neighborhood limited time with children. discipline control their children racist statements in the cohesion. • Limited opportunities for despite immigration status. community. • Changing community norms families to have pro-social • Increased opportunities for • High rate of poverty in related to firearms, drug use, involvement in the community. pro-social involvement in the neighborhoods. alcohol. use. • Parents, especially immigrant community. • Low expectation of chance • Development of pro-social parents, don't know what their for improved life. involvement opportunities. rights are regarding • High level of incivility in disciplining controlling their public sphere. children. Page 20 of 23 City of Yakima OJJ DP Gang Suppression Project Narrative School Domain Peer and Individual Domain Risk Factors: Protective Factors: Risk Factors: Protective Factors: • Children who have limited • Active efforts by the Yakima • Due to laws legalizing • Youth in engaged Latino academic success in school School District to encourage marijuana use for people over families who are not rebelling are more likely to drop out or attendance (rewards for perfect 21, youth likely perceive there likely feel pride in their experience behavioral blocks attendance and progress). to be little risk smoking heritage and therefore are more to ongoing school attendance. • Education Advocates available marijuana. Yakima County relislietn to the racism and the • While schools try to reward for high school age youth who youth are almost twice as low expectations of them attendance and punish have had contact with the likely to be arrested for drug commonly present in the wider truancy,these efforts haven't criminal justice system through law violations as the state community. been adequately successful at an OSPI grant to ESD 105. average (4 arrests per 1,000 vs. What is needed: insuring annual academic What is needed: 2.3 per 1,000 youth age 10-17, Shift in social norms against progress and academic Education advocacy for middle 2015 statistic). rebellious and delinquent competence for all students. school age youth • Local youth are more likely behaviors. • Children between 1st and 8th Alternative school resource for to engage in rebellious or Pro-social peer groups for the grade in Yakima County are youth of middle school age who delinquent behaviors than is most at-risk youth. almost 2.5 times as likely to are long term suspended or the norm in WA state (in Clear consequences for have unexcused absences expelled. measures like alcohol and drug delinquent behaviors. from school as their WA state Trauma informed resiliency offenses, property crime and counterparts. informed approach to discipline. vandalism, Yakima County • When schools do not have a youth are about 1.5 to 1.75 trauma informed approach to times more likely to be arrested school discipline children for these crimes than the WA with high ACEs scores are state average). more likely to have behavioral • the Yakima County teenage incidents that lead to pregnancy rate is almost 3 suspension and expulsion. times the state average at 90 • These risk factors lead to births per 1,000 teenage low school attachment and girls/women. commitment as well as more dramatic challenges such as long terri suspension or expulsion.. Page 21 of 23 34 City of Yakima OJJDP Gang Suppression Project Narrative Logic Model Please see logic model attached as Attachment 1. Timeline Please see timeline attached as Attachment 2. C. Capabilities and Competencies The City of Yakima began implementing the Comprehensive Gang Model approach to address youth violence and youth involvement in gangs with its receipt of a grant from the Washington State government in July 2018. This effort has involved the City Manager's office providing oversight of the project and quarterly reports to the State of WA, the city/county purchasing office generating contracts and overseeing them, and the finance department paying reimbursement invoices and billing the state of Washington. This all has gone very smoothly. The purchasing and finance departments currently oversee federal contracts for transportation funds and the Yakima Air Terminal. The same entities will be involved in similar fashion for the OJJDP Gang Suppression grant. Educational Service District 105,the employer of the Education Advocates under this grant proposal as a sub-grantee, manages and handles the financial side of numerous state and federal contracts that serve the 25 school districts in its service area. Program Management The program's management structure will be as follows: Direction of the program's efforts will be in the hands of the Gang Reduction Intervention Taskforce Steering Committee. Supervision of the efforts will be provided by Yakima Assistant City Manager. Overall program coordination will be provided by the program coordinator. This position will be based at the Yakima Police Department and paid for out of that Department's budget. The Page 22 of 23 35 City of Yakima OJJDP Gang Suppression Project Narrative individual in that role will provide support services to the Gang Reduction Intervention Taskforce (GRIT) Steering Committee; convene the GRIT Village, fostering partnerships and collaborations between members, and guiding the Village to identify service gaps and barriers and work to address both; and serving as a liaison to community stakeholders, the Yakima School District and ESD 105 with regards to the Yakima Youth Leadership Program, the 6th grade assemblies and the parent/guardian forum(s)for 6th graders' families. They will also guide the evaluation efforts in conjunction with the education advocates and program evaluator. There will be three education advocates working with the 6th graders at the four middle schools. The education advocates will be employed by Educational Service District 105 where they will receive initial and ongoing training and ongoing collaboration with the Education Advocates working in the high schools. The middle school education advocates will each be working approximately 12 hours per week and will work throughout the year. It should be noted that since gang membership, affiliation and violence affect all genders of 6th graders, care will be taken to ensure that there are Education Advocates of both genders available to the participants of the Yakima Youth Leadership Program. Please see the attached Organization Chart for further information. Plan for Data Collection Under our current state of Washington grant, we have developed data collection protocols that enlist the efforts of our staff person working with the youth, our GRIT consultant and our program evaluator. We anticipate continuing this approach for data points specific to youth in the program. We have collaborative working relationships with the Yakima County Juvenile Court and Yakima Police Department and will work with them to gather crime data more generally and related to specific youth in the program as we move into the OJJDP funded project Page 23 of 23 36 City of Yakima Gang Suppression Budget Narrative Year 1 Staffing: The Gang Reduction Intervention Taskforce Coordinator and Supervisor will both be employees of the City of Yakima. The Coordinator will dedicate 50% of a full time equivalent position to the project at$18.39 per hour. The Supervisor will dedicate 10% of his/her time to the project at $65.75 per hour. The three Gang Reduction Intervention Taskforce Education Advocates will work for Educational Service District 105. They will work 10 hours per week on average for 47 weeks out of the year. They will also have 11 hours for evening work meeting with parents over the course of the year. These hours will total 481 per year. Their rate of pay will be $27.75 per hour. Fringe Benefits: The Yakima City Staff will receive medical, dental and vision coverage, 1% deferred compensation. The fringe benefits for them include all applicable taxes, workers' compensation payments and life insurance expense. The rate for these items is calculated as a total for all the benefits divided by the percentage of full time that they will work on the Gang Suppression grant. The Educational Service District Education Advocates will receive the employer contribution to their retirement fund of 13% of their salary. They will receive no health insurance benefits. Their employers' share of payroll taxes is calculated at 12%. Travel: The Education Advocates will receive mileage reimbursement for their local travel at the current IRS rate. That rate is currently $.58 per mile. The average trip is calculated at 6 miles (Yakima School District has a fairly compact catchment area so this average distance between schools or to parent/youth households seems realistic). One person from the program will travel to the TTA Center's Cross Site Grantee meeting. The costs of which are calculated at currently available air fare, hotel expenses, per diem meal rate and local travel to and from the airport. Equipment: Education Service District 105 will provide the Education Advocates with cell phones for their work with the students and families as well as laptops. The laptops will be set up with all necessary programs, wi-fi access and ongoing tech support. All tech support for the devices is included in the cost, including record retention costs. The cell phone cost is $850 and the computer and support cost is $2,300 per year. Subawards: The GRIT Evaluator will guide the evaluation elements of the program, working with the GRIT coordinator to make any changes to the youth and parent survey and exit interview guides for parents and school leaders. Juliana Van Olphen has been the program evaluator for the past year while City of Yakima has had the gang grant from the state of Washington. She will provide initial feedback to the Education Advocates about their data collection efforts for each student. The evaluator position is paid at $60 per hour. She is expected to work 166.66 hours per year, approximately 3.2 hours per week. This amounts to $10,000 per year. 37 Indirect Costs: The City of Yakima will not charge an administrative rate. Instead it will be absorbing the indirect costs to cover services provided by the City's Purchasing, Finance, Human Resources and City Manager departments. Educational Service District 105 will charge a 7.5% Indirect cost administrative rate on all employee wage/salary times. They will not charge the indirect cost administrative rate on the technology fees or employee local travel. This rate is below the normal grant management indirect rate of 10% and is below the de minimis OJP limit of 10%. City of Yakima Gang Suppression Budget Narrative 38 Year 2 Staffing: The Gang Reduction Intervention Taskforce Coordinator and Supervisor will both be employees of the City of Yakima. The Coordinator will dedicate 50% of a full time equivalent position to the project at$18.84 per hour. The Supervisor will dedicate 10% of his/her time to the project at $67.39 per hour. The three Gang Reduction Intervention Taskforce Education Advocates will work for Educational Service District 105. They will work 10 hours per week on average for 47 weeks out of the year. They will also have 11 hours for evening work meeting with parents over the course of the year. These hours will total 481 per year. Their rate of pay will be $28.30 per hour. Fringe Benefits: The Yakima City Staff will receive medical, dental and vision coverage, 1% deferred compensation. The fringe benefits for them include all applicable taxes, workers' compensation payments and life insurance expense. The rate for these items is calculated as a total for all the benefits divided by the percentage of full time that they will work on the Gang Suppression grant. The Educational Service District Education Advocates will receive the employer contribution to their retirement fund of 13% of their salary. They will receive no health insurance benefits. Their employers' share of payroll taxes is calculated at 12%. Travel: The Education Advocates will receive mileage reimbursement for their local travel at the current IRS rate. That rate is currently $.58 per mile. The average trip is calculated at 6 miles (Yakima School District has a fairly compact catchment area so this average distance between schools or to parent/youth households seems realistic). One person from the program will travel to the TTA Center's Cross Site Grantee meeting. The costs of which are calculated at currently available air fare, hotel expenses, per diem meal rate and local travel to and from the airport. Equipment: Education Service District 105 will provide the Education Advocates with cell phones for their work with the students and families as well as laptops. The laptops will be set up with all necessary programs, wi-fi access and ongoing tech support. All tech support for the devices is included in the cost, including record retention costs. The cell phone cost is $850 and the computer and support cost is $2,300 per year. Subawards: The GRIT Evaluator will guide the evaluation elements of the program, working with the GRIT coordinator to make any changes to the youth and parent survey and exit interview guides for parents and school leaders. Juliana Van Olphen has been the program evaluator for the past year while City of Yakima has had the gang grant from the state of Washington. She will provide initial feedback to the Education Advocates about their data collection efforts for each student. The evaluator position is paid at $60 per hour. She is expected to work 166.66 hours per year, approximately 3.2 hours per week. This amounts to $10,000 per year. Indirect Costs: The City of Yakima will not charge an administrative rate. Instead it will be absorbing the indirect costs to cover services provided by the City's Purchasing, Finance, Human Resources and City Manager departments. 39 Educational Service District 105 will charge a 7.5% Indirect cost administrative rate on all employee wage/salary times. They will not charge the indirect cost administrative rate on the technology fees or employee local travel. This rate is below the normal grant management indirect rate of 10% and is below the de minimis OJP limit of 10%. 40 Year 3 Staffing: The Gang Reduction Intervention Taskforce Coordinator and Supervisor will both be employees of the City of Yakima. The Coordinator will dedicate 50% of a full time equivalent position to the project at$19.31 per hour. The Supervisor will dedicate 10% of his/her time to the project at $69.07 per hour. The three Gang Reduction Intervention Taskforce Education Advocates will work for Educational Service District 105. They will work 10 hours per week on average for 47 weeks out of the year. They will also have 11 hours for evening work meeting with parents over the course of the year. These hours will total 481 per year. Their rate of pay will be $28.87 per hour. Fringe Benefits: The Yakima City Staff will receive medical, dental and vision coverage, 1% deferred compensation. The fringe benefits for them include all applicable taxes, workers' compensation payments and life insurance expense. The rate for these items is calculated as a total for all the benefits divided by the percentage of full time that they will work on the Gang Suppression grant. The Educational Service District Education Advocates will receive the employer contribution to their retirement fund of 13% of their salary. They will receive no health insurance benefits. Their employers' share of payroll taxes is calculated at 12%. Travel: The Education Advocates will receive mileage reimbursement for their local travel at the current IRS rate. That rate is currently $.58 per mile. The average trip is calculated at 6 miles (Yakima School District has a fairly compact catchment area so this average distance between schools or to parent/youth households seems realistic). One person from the program will travel to the TTA Center's Cross Site Grantee meeting. The costs of which are calculated at currently available air fare, hotel expenses, per diem meal rate and local travel to and from the airport. Equipment: Education Service District 105 will provide the Education Advocates with cell phones for their work with the students and families as well as laptops. The laptops will be set up with all necessary programs, wi-fi access and ongoing tech support. All tech support for the devices is included in the cost, including record retention costs. The cell phone cost is $850 and the computer and support cost is $2,300 per year. Subawards: The GRIT Evaluator will guide the evaluation elements of the program, working with the GRIT coordinator to make any changes to the youth and parent survey and exit interview guides for parents and school leaders. Juliana Van Olphen has been the program evaluator for the past year while City of Yakima has had the gang grant from the state of Washington. She will provide initial feedback to the Education Advocates about their data collection efforts for each student. The evaluator position is paid at $60 per hour. She is expected to work 166.66 hours per year, approximately 3.2 hours per week. This amounts to $10,000 per year. Indirect Costs: The City of Yakima will not charge an administrative rate. Instead it will be absorbing the indirect costs to cover services provided by the City's Purchasing, Finance, Human Resources and City Manager departments. 41 Educational Service District 105 will charge a 7.5% Indirect cost administrative rate on all employee wage/salary times. They will not charge the indirect cost administrative rate on the technology fees or employee local travel. This rate is below the normal grant management indirect rate of 10% and is below the de minimis OJP limit of 10%. Yakima, WA Gang Reduction Intervention Taskforce OJJDP Gang Suppression Timeline 2019 Month Project Goal Related Objectives Activities Expected Person Completion Date Responsible Identify and Convene service providers and Hold bi-monthly meetings of Month 6. GRIT address service concerned individuals as the the GRIT Village where we Coordinator & 1 gaps and barriers. Gang Reduction Intervention continue to identify service Village Taskforce (GRIT) Village to gaps, shortages in capacity and identify service gaps and barriers to youth and families barriers. accessing available services. Create a blueprint Gang Reduction Intervention Hold bi-monthly meetings of Ongoing GRIT Village & 6 for a Taskforce (GRIT) Village the GRIT Village to design Coordinator comprehensive works to fill service gaps with needed services, secure funding with help from network of new services and reduce and implement. Work with GRIT Steering services for gang barriers to service access. additional community service Committee. at risk and providers to reduce/remove involved youth. barriers. All three goals All Objectives Recruit and hire Gang Month -1 Chief of Police, -1 Reduction Intervention Assistant City Taskforce Coordinator Manager All three goals All Objectives Recruit and hire GRIT Month 1 City Manager 1 Evaluator Prevent youth To reduce significantly the Recruit and hire three End of Month 1 Education from joining a number of youth who are Education Advocates to work Service District 1 gang or becoming Yakima School District(YSD) with Yakima SD sixth graders (ESD) 105 victimized by a sixth graders during the 2019- in Yakima Youth Leadership Teaching & gang 20 and 2020-21 school years Program Learning who join gangs during the Support Yakima Youth Leadership Director and Program's (YYLP) existence. GRIT Coordinator Page 1 of 6 Yakima, WA Gang Reduction Intervention Taskforce OJJDP Gang Suppression Timeline 2019 Month Project Goal Related Objectives Activities Expeeted Person Responsible Completion Date Prevent youth from To reduce significantly the Train Education Advocates on Month 2 ESD 105 Teaching joining a gang or number of youth who are Case Management, Home and Learning 1 becoming victimized YSD sixth graders during visiting, program goals and Support Asst. by a gang the 2019-20 and 2020-21 objectives, how to administer Director and Senior school years who join gangs parent and student surveys, how Ed. Advocate during the YYLP's to track data collection points existence. and send them to evaluator. Prevent youth from To reduce significantly the Secure laptop computers and Month 1 City, YSD or ESD, 1 joining a gang or number of youth who are phones for Education depending on who becoming victimized YSD sixth graders during Advocates working in the is providing these by a gang the 2019-20, 2020-21 and program. items. 2021-22 school years who join gangs during the YYLP's existence. Prevent youth from To reduce significantly the Count the number of YSD Months 2, 7, Ed. Advocates and joining a gang or number of youth who are Middle School students wearing 13, 19, 25, school staff 2 becoming victimized YSD sixth graders during gang colors, sporting hair styles 32 and 36 by a gang the grant period school years associated with gang life, who join gangs. displaying gang signs at school. Prevent youth from To reduce significantly the Identify youth to participate in Month 2, Middle School 2 joining a gang or number of youth who are YYLP Month 11 Admin team, School becoming victimized YSD sixth graders during and Month Resource officers, by a gang the 2019-20, 2020-21 and 23 Teachers and Ed. 2021-22 school years who Advocates join gangs during the YYLP's existence. Page 2 of 6 Yakima, WA Gang Reduction Intervention Taskforce OJJDP Gang Suppression Timeline 2019 Month Project Goal Related Objectives Activities Expected Person Responsible Completion Date Prevent youth from To reduce significantly the Enroll youth in YYLP aiming Month 3, Education 2 joining a gang or number of youth who are for an initial cohort of 30 sixth then ongoing Advocates with becoming victimized YSD sixth graders during grade students via invitation, as space in support from school by a gang the 2019-20, 2020-21 and youths' acceptance & program counselors and 2021-22 school years who permission authorization from becomes school resource join gangs during the all youths' parents or guardians available officers YYLP's existence. Prevent youth from Objectives 2, 3, 5 Administer youth and Ongoing Education joining a gang or parent/guardian surveys at entry Advocates 2 becoming victimized into program. by a gang. Prevent youth from To help students who Administer YYLP training Ongoing Education 2 joining a gang or participate in the program to curriculum with each student in Advocates becoming victimized become more resilient and one-on-one meetings. by a gang. thus less likely to join gangs by teaching them leadership skills, and teaching and fostering hope. 1 Prevent youth from To increase instruction time Procure Incentives for YYLP Ongoing GRIT Coordinator joining a gang or of students in the YYLP and student challenges. becoming victimized reduce their disciplinary by a gang. issues. 3 Prevent youth from To increase instruction time Collect and record attendance & Ongoing Ed. Advocates joining a gang or of students in the YYLP and tardiness data, homework becoming victimized reduce their disciplinary completion, disciplinary records by a gang. issues. and record on student data sheets. Page 3 of 6 Yakima, WA Gang Reduction Intervention Taskforce OJJDP Gang Suppression Timeline 2019 Month Project Goal Related Objectives Activities Expected Person Responsible Completion Date Prevent youth from To increase instruction time Make YYLP attendance and Ongoing Education joining a gang or of students in the YYLP and behavior challenges. Reward Advocates 3 becoming victimized reduce their disciplinary students for completing the by a gang. issues. challenges. To help students participating in the YYLP increase their level of school engagement and desire to learn. Prevent youth from To refer and help connect Refer and help connect youth Ongoing Ed. Advocates and joining a gang or parents/guardians of and families with desired GRIT Coordinator 3 becoming victimized participating youth to community resources including by a gang. needed/requested after school programs, mental community resources to help health & health care resources, families meet basic needs food banks, rent and utilities and promote resilience. assistance, etc. Prevent youth from To help students who Help youth who have Ongoing. Education 3 joining a gang or participate in the program to completed the YYLP Advocates, school becoming victimized become more resilient and curriculum to exit from the personnel who by a gang. thus less likely to join gangs program, linking them to volunteer to be by teaching them leadership supportive adults in the school YYLP youth skills, and teaching and for follow up monitoring. supporters. fostering hope. Prevent youth from To help students who Administer exit surveys Ongoing as Education joining a gang or participate in the program to interviews with youth who have youth Advocates, GRIT becoming victimized become more resilient and completed the program and complete Coordinator and 5 by a gang. by teaching them leadership successfully are using their active evaluator skills, and teaching and newfound skills to be leaders in elements of fostering hope. their schools. YYLP Page 4 of 6 Yakima, WA Gang Reduction Intervention Taskforce OJJDP Gang Suppression Timeline 2019 Month Project Goal Related Objectives Activities Expected Person Responsible Completion Date Prevent youth from To provide opportunities for Invite graduating youth to serve Ongoing Education 5 joining a gang or youth who have completed as informal mentors to their Advocates becoming victimized YYLP curriculum to move peers, recruiters for the program by a gang. into leadership roles. and enlist their help when conducting YYLP group events. Help them connect with broader school leadership positions. Prevent youth from Match youth who participate Refer interested youth to Ongoing Education joining a gang or in the program with mentors mentor programs available in Advocates 3 becoming victimized through existing and newly Yakima. Advocate for their by a gang. created mentoring programs being at the top of any waiting with long term lists for a mentor at each mentor/mentee matches. program. Reduce and sustain Reduce youth gang violence Count youth and gang-related Months 1, 7, GRIT Coordinator, 1 reductions in youth by starving the gangs of crimes including gun and 13, 19, 25 Yakima Police violence, particularly new, young recruits. violent crime in Yakima for and 36. Department gun and gang prior six months. Statisticians, violence and Yakima Juvenile victimization. Court staff. Create a blueprint for Grow the partnerships and Conduct surveys of GRIT Months 1, 9, GRIT Coordinator a comprehensive collaborative efforts between Village member agencies to 18, 27 and 36 1 network of services service providers in the measure current and planned for youth at risk of GRIT Village. partnerships and collaborations becoming, or are, to serve youth at risk of involved in gangs. becoming gang involved, or are in a gang lifestyle. Prevent youth from Create partnerships with Presentations to area service Ongoing GRIT Coordinator 3 joining a gang or community groups to clubs and other community becoming victimized increase the number of groups, explaining the program by a gang. mentors who are available to efforts and enlisting members' work with YYLP youth. support. Page 5 of 6 Yakima, WA Gang Reduction Intervention Taskforce OJJDP Gang Suppression Timeline 2019 Month Project Goal Related ob. et es Activities Expeeted Pcrson Respatvsible Completion Date Identify and address Expand the membership of Propose revision to charter of Month 5 GRIT Supervisor 4 service gaps and the Gang Reduction the Gang Reduction barriers, for serving Intervention Taskforce Intervention Taskforce Steering youth at risk of Steering Committee. Committee. becoming gang involved or continuing in the gang lifestyle. Same as above Expand the membership of Vote on charter revision Month 5 GRIT Steering 5 the Gang Reduction Committee Intervention Taskforce Steering Committee. Same as above Expand the membership of Recruit new Steering Comm. Month 9 GRIT Steering 6 the Gang Reduction members from key community Committee, GRIT Intervention Taskforce sectors including family support Coordinator, GRIT Steering Committee. and case management, mental Supervisor health, independent living skills, employment training and retention and faith and youth development Same as above Expand the membership of Elect new Steering Committee Month 9 GRIT Steering 9 the Gang Reduction members from people Committee Intervention Taskforce nominated Steering Committee. All 3 goals All 12 Objectives Compile interim and final Month 12, 24 GRIT Evaluator, 18 reports outlining the successes and 36, GRIT Coordinator, and challenges of the Gang (other times GIRT Steering Reduction Intervention if so directed Committee, GRIT Taskforce effort. under grant Supervisor, Ed guidelines.) Advocates Page 6 of 6 48 „..-"P"..--Tho 1 .1 ."•., 471 roettoi, -, Fr:I 1. LEGAL DEPARTMENT Aivr r writ 200 South Third Street ( 1),L; 4* Asp i Yakima,Washington 98901-2830 \,-;;:!,r r„::2' June 14, 2019 Mr. Kevin Chase Superintendent, ESD 105 Ill S. 2"d Avenue Yakima, WA 98901 Re: OJJDP Grant Application Letter of Understanding Regarding Partnership Updated Dear Kevin, Thank you for meeting with Matt Fairbank and me last Friday to discuss some ideas surrounding the continuation and expansion of the Yakima Youth Leadership Program, which is currently operating on a pilot program basis pursuant to the Memorandum of Understanding between the City, ESD 105 and the Yakima School District. We believe, and the evidence shows, that this program is having a positive effect on the 6111 grade students who are involved, with a decrease in absences and tardiness in school and increases in grades. We will continue the program through June 30, 2019 (when our current grant funding runs out), and will have additional data on the program available after July 15, 2019. One of the things we have heard from YSD personnel is that they would like to expand the program to all of the middle schools, and have an increased number of students be involved in the Program. We also heard that it is important to have sonic sort of education piece available to all 6th grade students, and all of their parents/guardians. We have worked this feedback into the grant proposal. The Department of Justice has available a small number of 01113P grants for gang suppression activities. We believe that the Yakima Youth Leadership Program, working in conjunction with the Village meetings of providers and stakeholders and the oversight of the Steering Committee, is an excellent candidate for one of the $230,000.00 grants available. That money is available for a 36 month period for suppression activities, which totals a little over $76,000.00 per year. The three primary elements of the overall program we propose for the grant are: I. Yakima Youth Leadership Program for up to 30 students at a time across all four Yakima School District middle schools with the anticipation that approximately 75 students will be served each year. a. Entrance and exit criteria to allow for fluid program participants b. Personalized coaching for youth and their families who participate in the program Yakima re/ I I I[ Cll'ii Oilifir)11 (5(YJ) 575 6030 . Prosecution Divio fen (509) 575 6033 • Fax (50Y) 575 a i 60 49 c. Monitoring of behavioral issues, grades,attendance, contact with law enforcement and other matters as appropriate d. Connecting youth to services such as tutoring, after school activities,sports, mental health,medical, and other community resources a Assistance for families in connecting with community resources f. Connection to volunteer mentors through other existing mentorship programs in Yakima g. Parent coaching and help, as well as help with accessing community services 2. 6'1' Grade Student and Parent Education a. Connecting with all 6" graders about gang awareness, resilience, hope, opportunities, conflict resolution or other pertinent topics to be determined jointly with the Yakima Youth Leadership Program coordinator and the Yakima School District. This could be through an assembly or series of assemblies, or in-class time depending on what is deemed appropriate by the YSD. b. Connecting with all parents of 6" graders through an educational seminar or seminars discussing similar topics, as well as adverse childhood impacts, community services available, and parent rights. At such a seminar there could also be a services fair where service providers can provide handouts or sign up families and/or youth for services or after school programming. Seminars would need to include a meal and child care for higher attendance. 3. Community-wide collaboration through the GRIT Village a. Continue Village meetings and collaboration with meetings still held every other month b. Monthly Steering Committee meetings to discuss long-term strategies and capacity. c. Provide support for the efforts listed in(1)and (2) above. The OJJDP grant will not cover the costs of all of these aspects. Therefore, the City is seeking support from its current partners—Yakima School District and ESD 105. The City will also be providing personnel support, which may include creating a position within the City to coordinate the program, run the Village meetings and support the Steering Committee. We are asking that each entity listed herein (the City, YSD and ESD 105) contribute to the program, with the expectation that the Village participants will also be willing to provide specific contributions to portions of the program (in part as indicated below), Many Village members are supplying Letters of Support outlining their participation in the Village and wanting to be part of the community-wide effort to limit gang violence and activity in Yakima. For purposes of the OJJDP grant, we would like to formalize our understanding of ESD 105's role in the Yakima Youth Leadership Program and the 6' Grade Student/Parent education piece. If the grant is received, ESD 105 would agree to the following: 1. ESD 105 will hire three (3) Education Advocates to work part time (approximately 600 hours per year). The Education Advocates would be housed at ESD 105, although they will not have designated office or meeting space since the majority of their work will be at middle schools. ESD 105 will allow the Education Advocates to utilize space at the Open Doors facility as available. 50 ESD 105 will allow YSD to participate in the hiring of the Education Advocate positions. 3. ESD 105 will provide computers and cellular telephones, as well as all tech support to those Education Advocates at the same rate as other ESD 105 employees. 4. ESD 105 will accept 7.5% as its indirect cost rate for the OJJDP grant. ESD 105 will provide training to the Education Advocates hired for these positions and will allow the Education Advocates to attend trainings offered by the Yakima School District if those trainings are deemed relevant and appropriate. Under the current plan, the YSD will be providing the space and facilities for the Yakima Youth Leadership Program and 6th grade class assemblies and parent education night, The parent education night is anticipated to have a"service fair" component where ESD 105 could set up a table to talk about its Open Doors facility and other programs available to youth and their families. I hope that you find the above outline of the program acceptable. If you agree to it, the City is asking you to sign below. If the City receives the OJJDP grant funding, it is understood that a formal Memorandum of Understanding, or similar legal contract, will be entered into, which outlines the terms above, as well as other components of the partnership between the City and ESD 105 on this project I will need to have you return this Letter, signed on or before June 20, 2019. The government suggests that the grant applications and accompanying documents (of which this would be one that is required) be uploaded on June 21, 2019 with the deadline for the grant applications on June 24, 2019. The formal contract or memorandum of understanding will need to be signed after the grant has been awarded. Thank you for working with the City on the pilot program operating in Franklin Middle School and Lewis and Clark Middle School. We have seen positive impacts with the students who have been served. Your cooperation in the effort in the future, and your willingness to work with the City to obtain this grant funding to continue and expand the program would be appreciated. Please let me know if you have any questions, and contact me as soon as possible if additional meetings or discussions need to occur so that we can finalize our tentative agreement within the deadlines stated above. Sincerely, Sara Watkins City of Yakima,GRIT 51 ESD 105 agrees to the terms of this letter of intent and will enter into a memorandum of understanding with the City to partner on the Yakima Youth Leadership Program and related activities if the OJJDP t is awarded to the City. ES 5 By: Kevin Chase ESD 105 Superintendent 52 .eszsmtvztv, el t --* LEGAL DEPARTMENT • 200 South Third Street ) j p:.,..r , Yakima,Washington 98901-2830 June 14,2019 Dr. Jack Irion Superintendent, Yakima School District 104 N. 4th Avenue Yakima, WA 98902 Re: OJJDP Grant Application Letter of Understanding Regarding Partnership Updated Dear Jack, Matt Fairbank and Sara Watkins met with Amanda Jewell and Omar Santoy to discuss some ideas surrounding the continuation and expansion of the Yakima Youth Leadership Program, which is currently operating on a pilot program basis pursuant to the Memorandum of Understanding between the City and the Yakima School District. We believe, and the evidence shows, that this program is having a positive effect on the 6th grade students who are involved, with a decrease in absences and tardiness in school and increases in grades. We will continue the program through June 30,2019, and will have additional data on the program available after July 15,2019. One of the things we have heard from YSD personnel is that they would like to expand the program to all of the middle schools,and have an increased number of students be involved in the Program. We also heard that it is important to have some sort of education piece available to all 6th grade students, and all of their parents/guardians. We have worked this feedback into the grant proposal. The Department of Justice has available a small number of OJJDP grants for gang suppression activities. We believe that the Yakima Youth Leadership Program,working in conjunction with the Village meetings of providers and stakeholders and the oversight of the Steering Committee, is an excellent candidate for one of the$230,000.00 grants available. That money is available for a 36 month period for suppression activities,which totals a little over$76,000.00 per year. The three primary elements of the overall program we propose for the grant are: 1. Yakima Youth Leadership Program for up to 30 students at a time across all four Yakima School District middle schools with the anticipation that approximately 75 students will be served each year. a. Entrance and exit criteria to allow for fluid program participants b. Personalized coaching for youth and their families who participate in the program Yakima ***** Civil Division (509)575-6030 . Prosecution Division(509)575-6033 • Fu (509)575-6160 1 1111, 1994 53 c. Monitoring of behavioral issues,grades, attendance, contact with law enforcement and other matters as appropriate d. Connecting youth to services such as tutoring, after school activities, sports, mental health,medical, and other community resources e. Assistance for families in connecting with community resources 1 Connection to volunteer mentors through other existing mentorship programs in Yakima g. Parent coaching and help,as well as help with accessing community services 2. 6th 3 de Student : Parent Education a. Connecting with all 6th graders about gang awareness,resilience,hope, opportunities, conflict resolution or other pertinent topics to be determined jointly with the Yakima Youth Leadership Program coordinator and the Yakima School District. This could be through an assembly or series of assemblies, or in-class time depending on what is deemed appropriate by the YSD. b. Connecting with all parents of 6th graders through an educational seminar or seminars discussing similar topics,as well as adverse childhood impacts, community services available, and parent rights. At such a seminar there could also be a services fair where service providers can provide handouts or sign up families and/or youth for services or after school programming. Seminars would need to include a meal and child care for higher attendance. 3. Community-wide collaboration through the GRIT Village a. Continue Village meetings and collaboration with meetings still held every other month b. Monthly Steering Committee meetings to discuss long-term strategies and capacity. c. Provide support for the efforts listed in(1)and(2) above. The OJJDP grant will not cover the costs of all of these aspects. Therefore,the City is seeking support from its current partners—Yakima School District and ESD 105. The City will also be providing personnel support, which may include creating a position within the City to coordinate the program,run the Village meetings and support the Steering Committee. We are asking that each entity listed herein(the City, YSD and ESD 105) contribute to the program,with the expectation that the Village participants will also be willing to provide specific contributions to portions of the program(in part as indicated below). Many Village members are supplying Letters of Support outlining their participation in the Village and wanting to be part of the community-wide effort to limit gang violence and activity in Yakima. For purposes of the OLTDP grant,we would like to fo • ize our understan,* g of YSD's role in the Yakirna Youth Leadership Progr: and the 6th Grade Studen ' nt education piece. If the grant is received, YSD would agree to the following: 1. YSD will allow the Yakima Youth Leadership Program coaches and coordinator to have access to students involved in the program during the school day as the teacher, principal and staff allow. It is anticipated that each coach will be in the schools for approximately 12 hours per week. Coaches will coordinate with school staff for meeting room space, and the times when student contact is allowed. Coaches will also 54 have access to relevant data(and will be required to complete any training or paperwork associated with gaining access to relevant data—anticipated to include attendance, grades, and disciplinary data). 2. YSD will provide the space at each of the four middle schools for an all 6th grade class assembly at least one time per year. This assembly may be combined with other ass- bly progr ii * g al - g y envisioned or be a separate assembly. I e assembly will focus on a topic that is pe •ent to 6th graders and will help them i i e good decisions and stay out of gangs and violence. The topics will be jointly agreed upon in advance between the YSD and the program coordinator. YSD will be responsible for any costs associated with the assemblies. It is anticipated that local stakeholders, service providers and community members would volunteer their time to speak and present at this assembly,however, in the event there are costs associated with the speaker(s), YSD will pay those costs. 3. YSD will provide space at a school, or coordinate to provide space outside of a school, for the education presentation to 6th e p: - ts/f: : di: s. Since this likely will be in the evening or on a weekend, YSD understands that coordination includes providing a meal and some sort of child care(could be done through volunteer organizations). The topics will be jointly agreed upon in advance between the YSD and the program coordinator. YSD will be responsible for any costs associated with the presentation. It is anticipated that local stakeholders, service providers and community members would volunteer their time to speak and present at this assembly,however, in the event there are costs associated with the speaker(s), YSD will pay those costs. The coordinator will organize a services fair where families can sign up for services, after school activities, and get information about opportunities in Yakima. YSD will provide space for this services fair at the location. 4. YSD agrees to help train, where appropriate,the Yakima Youth Leadership Program coaches at no cost. Training could include, but is not limited to,training in case management,home visitation,ACEs, and school district policies. Any training will be at the discretion of the YSD. Training also could include allowing the Yakima Youth Leadership Program coaches to attend YSD training opportunities provided to other district staff. 5. YSD will designate a liaison at each school to work with the Yakima Youth Leadership Program coaches and coordinator. How often these parties meet is up to the discretion of the liaison and the coaches. Under the current plan,the coaches would not be employed by the City or YSD. They would be employed through the ESD, which would also provide space for meetings, when necessary, as well as the equipment and office supplies necessary for the coaches(tablets/laptops and phones, etc.). As part of the partnership, ESD 105 has agreed to be the hiring agency for the three limited time Education Advocates which will be assigned to the middle schools. ESD will also provide space at the Open Doors facility when necessary for meetings or workspace for the Education Advocates. ESD has also agreed to an overhead percentage of approximately 7.5% for the federal grant. I hope that you find the above outline of the program acceptable. If you agree to it, the City is asking you to sign below. If the City receives the OJJDP grant funding,it is understood that a 55 formal Memorandum of Understanding,or similar legal contract,will be entered into,which outlines the terms above, as well as other components of the partnership between the City and the Yakima School District on this project. I will need to have you return this Letter, signed on or before June 20,2019. The government suggests that the grant applications and accompanying documents(of which this would be one that is required)be uploaded on June 21,2019 with the deadline for the grant applications on June 24, 2019. The formal contract or memorandum of Thundanerkstyanoudinfogr wialllolwnienegd tthoebpeilsoitgnpreodgraftatner ttoheo pgreranattehiansFbreaeln:daiwn armdideddl. e School and Lewis and Clark Middle School. We have seen positive impacts with the students who have been served. Your cooperation in the effort in the future, and your willingness to work with the City to obtain this grant funding to continue and expand the program would be appreciated. Please let me know if you have any questions,and contact me as soon as possible if additional meetings or discussions need to occur so that we can finalize our tentative agreement within the deadlines stated above. Sincerely, Sara Watkins City of Yakima, GRIT The Yakima School District agrees to the terms of this letter of intent and will enter into a memorandum of understanding with the City to partner on the Yakima Youth Leadership Program and related activities if the OJJDP grant is awarded to the City. YAKIMA SCHOOL DISTRICT By: Di. Jack Irian Trevor Greene, Incoming Superintendent Yakima School District Superintendent Cc: Kevin Chase Cliff Moore Matt Fairbank