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08/27/2019 03 City Manager Update 1 a\'4\lyy bxk ik 1 PPP d g. P A PPPPPP+PP s' lii it • tYlltYlA.\ta. BUSINESS OF THE CITY COUNCIL YAKIMA, WASHINGTON AGENDA STATEMENT Item No. 3. For Meeting of:August 27, 2019 ITEM TITLE: City Manager update SUBMITTED BY: Cynthia Martinez, Interim City Manager SUMMARY EXPLANATION: City Manager Update Items: 1. LED Light Project Update 2. City of Yakima delegated Pretreatment Control Authority over Union Gap and Terrace Heights 3. Tiger Mart property 4. Legislative priorities 2020 5. Interim City Manager search 6. Strategic Plan update 7. Study session/special meeting schedule • August 27 --Agenda preview • August 29 -- Safe Routes to Schools and Clean City • September 24 --Agenda preview • October 1 --2020 budget • October 3 --2020 budget • October 8 --2020 budget • October 8 -- Homeless issues and permanent shelter location • October 10 -- 2020 budget • TB D -- Meeting with legislators ITEM BUDGETED: STRATEGIC PRIORITY: APPROVED FOR �, � - � � Interim City Manager SUBMITTAL: 2 STAFF RECOMMENDATION: BOARD/COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION: ATTACHMENTS: Description Upload Date Type D a NI prior 73201q Onvnr Memo D 3 4 stale pnor 3272019 Cevcr Memo D 3 4 PP 3232010 Cover Memo D 3 6 SP 3232019 aunr Memo 3 Arm « // ««« « « #«« %Q:". 1/4,14.00„ City of Yakima 2019 Federal Legislative Priorities Actively Pursue - Comprehensive immigration reform, including passage of the Bar Removal of Individuals Who Dream of Growing Our Economy ("BRIDGE") Act, Development, Relief, and Education for Alien Minors ("DREAM") Act, or similar legislation - Efforts to address homelessness and to reduce barriers to affordable housing and human services programs locally, regionally, and nationally - Yakima Basin Integrated Plan funding requests - Funding from available federal sources to assist the Yakima Police Department in replacing its aging radio system - Increased funding for Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention ("OJJDP") and other federal programs designed to combat gang crime and violence - Development of adequate, predictable, and sustainable funding for airport capital projects and airport economic development projects Support - Ongoing funding assistance provided to local public safety entities through programs such as Community Oriented Policing Services ("COPS"), Staffing for Adequate Fire and Emergency Response ("SAFER"), the Assistance to Firefighters Grant Program ("AFG") and Local Law Enforcement Block Grants ( LLEBG") - Funding from the Transportation Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act ("TIFIA") program, the Better Utilizing Investments to Leverage Development ("BUILD") program, and other available federal sources for critical local transportation projects such as development of streets serving the Mill Site project, the North 1st Street Revitalization Project, and the Yakima East-West Corridor project - Continued funding of the Community Development Block Grant ( CDBG") program at current or increased levels - Development of pilot youth development programs (with accompanying funding) 4 4' .). :=f 4 City of Yakima 2019 State Legislative Priorities Actively Pursue - Increased state funding to support local efforts to provide homeless services and affordable housing, including incentives for private developers to invest in low-to-moderate income housing - Replacing the one percent property tax revenue limit with a limit tied to cost drivers (SB 5772 — HB 1764) - Legislation designed to address the high rate of domestic violence present in Washington State (SHB 2820) - Equitable distribution of marijuana excise tax revenue to local government (SB 6552 — HB 2124) - Increased state funding to support local gang prevention, intervention, and suppression programs based on data generated from Yakima's pilot program Support - Efforts to reform and enhance the state behavioral health system - Increased state funding to assist cities in meeting indigent defense obligations (HB 2031 — HB 2012) - Full funding of the Washington State Basic Law Enforcement Academy - Legislation allocating one percent (1%) of the airport fuel tax imposed by RCW 82.12.020 to the aeronautics account to be used for airport capital projects (HB 2754) - Removing the July 1st, 2019 sunset language from RCW 43.43.960, which would allow"all risk resources" mobilizations to continue (HB 2508) Monitor - Legislation providing greater flexibility in the use of public funds for economic development purposes - Legislation allowing municipal fire departments and fire districts to obtain reimbursement from parties found liable for causing an incident requiring a fire department and/or fire district response (HB 2460) 2019 Post-Session Report for City of Yakima June 4, 2019 > a Luke Esser & 1::........., f$ 5t .. ..... ..... NJikF Federici x;.:.: • •• _ c ede c MyM ...._............ . nwiyy a .......•.•.•.n..v.•:.V � y .: tare r '�w'�'I " . 1 ,.11t tx...... ..i:a:•vLt * Z .._.' .ate':q.• •-. by On A FocusCity of Yakima 2019 Priority Issues State Legislative Priorities Actively Pursue - Increased state funding to support local efforts to provide homeless services and affordable housing, including incentives for private developers to invest in Our efforts were focused on low-to-moderate income housing - Replacing the one percent property tax revenue limit with a limit tied to cost drivers(SB 5772—HB 1764) the City of Ya ki ma's adopted - Legislation designed to address the high rate of domestic violence present in Washington State (SHB 2820) 2019 State Legislative -Equitable distribution of marijuana excise tax revenue to local government(SB 6552—HB 2124) Priorities and on other priority - Increased state funding to support local gang prevention, intervention,and suppression programs based on data generated from Yakima's pilot program issues that developed during Support the 2019 Legislative Session as - Efforts to reform and enhance the state behavioral health system - Increased state funding to assist cities in meeting indigent defense obligations(HB 2031 — HB 2012) directed by Communications & Full funding of the Washington State Basic Law Enforcement Academy - Legislation allocating one percent(1%)of the airport fuel tax imposed by RCW 82.12.020 to Public Affairs Director Randy the aeronautics account to be used for airport capital projects(HB 2754) - Removing the July 1",2019 sunset language from RCW 43.43.960,which would allow"all Be e h l e r and by City Manager risk resources mobilizations to continue(HB 2508) Monitor CliffMoore. - Legislation providing greater flexibility in the use of public funds for economic development purposes - Legislation allowing municipal fire departments and fire districts to obtain reimbursement from parties found liable for causing an incident requiring a fire department and/or fire district response(HB 2460) Actively Pursue Issues : Support of local efforts to provide homeless services and affordable housing, including incentives for private developers • 1406 allows local jurisdictions to utilize a portion of existing state sales tax revenues. ➢ City of Yakima could receive between $142,600 and $285,200 per year. • 1923 offers incentives, including up to $100,000 in planning grants, to jurisdictions that adopt specified, voluntary affordable housing and urban density policies. • 5334 enacts condominium liability reform to stimulate private condo construction. • 1219 allows use of 0.25% REET 2 for homelessness & affordable housing, until 2025. • Capital Budget included $175 million for the Housing Trust Fund. • Operating Budget included $15 million for permanent supportive housing and youth homelessness, and $14.5 million for the Housing and Essential Needs program. Actively Pursue Issues : Legislation designed to address the high rate of domestic violence present in Washington State • 1041 — "New Hope" program of eased conditions for receiving a certificate of discharge for a felony conviction and vacating convictions. • 1149 — Changes the Sexual Assault Protection Order statute to clarify that petitioners do not need to allege reasonable fear of future dangerous acts. • 1225 — Requires confiscation of all guns and ammunition of alleged abuser when probable cause of crime exists, may not be returned for at least five days. • 1517 — Omnibus DV bill that addresses no-contact orders, risk assessments, sentencing, supervision and treatment, and more. • 1532 — Concerning traumatic brain injuries in DV cases (requires training and data collection by law enforcement, information sharing with victims). • 1533 — Workplace DV resource availability poster. Actively Pursue Issues : Increased state funding to support local gang prevention, intervention, and suppression programs based on data generated from Yakima's pilot program • El Nuevo Camino did not receive a specific appropriation in the 2019-21 Operating Budget (and neither did any other gang prevention program in the state). • Instead the state provided $1 million for a competitive grant program focused on criminal street gang prevention and intervention. The Department of Children, Youth & Families will administer the grant application process, and it appears that El Nuevo Camino is well-positioned to be a leading grant applicant, based on the priority language contained in the budget proviso: "The department of children, youth, and families shall give priority to applicants who have demonstrated the greatest problems with criminal street gangs. Applicants composed of at a minimum, one or more local governmental entities and one or more nonprofit, nongovernmental organizations that have a documented history of creating and administering effective criminal street gang prevention and intervention programs may apply for funding under this subsection. " Actively Pursue Issues : Replacing the 1% property tax revenue limit with one tied to cost drivers • HB 2145 would have increased the local government property tax revenue limit to the sum of population growth and inflation, up to a maximum of three percent, but it failed to receive a public hearing. Equitable distribution of marijuana excise taxes to local governments • Distributions to local governments in the 2019-21 Operating Budget remained at $30 million, as was the case in 2017-19, instead of the $40 million anticipated when the current distributions were approved in 2015. • HB 1959 would have increased marijuana excise tax distributions to local governments (mostly to counties), but it failed to receive a public hearing. • HB 1008 to study the constitutional and statutory obligations and tax revenue capacity of local governments passed unanimously out of the House Local Government Committee but died in the House Appropriations Committee. Support Issues : Efforts to reform and enhance the behavioral health system • Capital Budget had $118 million for Community BH Beds, $47 million competitive pool and $71 million for specific projects, including $4 million for Yakima: ➢$2.2 million for Virginia Mason Memorial Hospital ➢$1.0 million for Yakima Valley Farmworkers Clinic Children's Village ➢$488,000 for Yakima Neighborhood Health Services ➢$309,000 for Yakima Valley Farmworkers Clinic • Operating Budget had $59 million to contract with community providers for beds for individuals coming out of state hospitals and other long-term placements. • 1767 includes $2.4 million to support local government efforts to divert persons with BH needs and disorders from the criminal justice system into treatment. • 5444 codified "Trueblood" settlement for timely competency evaluations and services, included $4 million for local law enforcement MH Field Response Program. • Capital Budget also provided $33.2 million to the UW for the predesign, planning, and design of a new 150-bed BH Teaching Facility in North Seattle. Support Issues : Increased funding to assist cities with indigent defense costs • Legislation to phase in full state funding for local government public defense expenses over ten years (1086 & 5098) never advanced. Would have cost the state over $200 million per biennium when fully implemented. Full funding of the Basic Law Enforcement Academy • Full funding was included in the 2019-21 Operating Budget for 19 Basic Law Enforcement Academy (BLEA) classes per year, as requested by the Criminal Justice Training Commission and local governments. • Bills to Shorten Waiting Period for BLEA Training (1253 & 5944) failed to advance. These bills would have reduced the statutory waiting period for an officer to receive BLEA training from six months to two months. Support Issues : Aviation legislation affecting Yakima Air Terminal • $5 million for initial funding of a Community Aviation Revitalization Loan program for public use airports was included in the 2019-21 Capital Budget. Fortunately, YKM meets the 75,000 enplanements/year eligibility threshold. • Legislation allocating 1% of the airport fuel tax to the aeronautics account to be used for airport capital projects (1457) did not advance. • 1917 authorizes a new exemption from the general prohibition against body- gripping traps for aviation managers to protect human and aviation security. • CWU received no funding in the Capital Budget for airplanes or hangars for its aviation program as the debate continues on the future location of the program. Support Issues : Removing the July 1st, 2019, sunset language from RCW 43.43.960, which would allow "all risk resources" mobilizations to continue • 1770 passed, removing the expiration date of July 1st, 2019, that was created by HB 1389 in 2015. So "all risk resources" mobilizations will be allowed to continue indefinitely. • All risk resources may not be mobilized to assist law enforcement during the exercise of constitutionally protect First Amendment rights or other protected concerted activity, however fire departments may provide medical care and firefighting when mobilized for any purpose. Monitor Issues : Legislation providing greater flexibility in the use of public funds for economic development purposes • 1746 allows a city outside King County to create local sales tax & property tax incentives to promote the development of commercial office space. • AWC priority bill 5564 failed to advance. • 5511 creates a program of grants and loans to expand broadband access in unserved areas, Capital Budget provided $21.5 million. Legislation allowing fire departments to be reimbursed by parties found liable for causing an incident response • 1169 would have entitled fire departments and fire districts to recover the actual costs of the cleanup of hazardous materials from insurers, but died in the Senate. Additional Priorities : Legislation related to City's Streetlight Replacement Program • 1594 clarifies the exemption for wiring and equipment associated with telecommunications installations. Expected to save the City of Yakima over a million dollars in its streetlight replacement program. Capital Budget : • $40 million for the Yakima Basin Integrated Plan • $1.2 million DOE Remedial Action Grant for the Tiger Oil site on North First • Three Floodplains by Design projects, including: • $8,072,000 Yakima Gap to Gap • $4,275,000 Upper Yakima • $531,000 Cowiche Naches • Many Local & Community Projects also received funding: • $22,700,000 for the Yakima Valley College West Campus expansion • $2,500,000 for Veterans Supportive Housing • $875,000 for the Larson Gallery Renovation • $737,000 for the Yakima Valley Farmworkers Clinic • $600,000 for the SOZO Indoor Sports Complex • $500,000 for the Innovative Health Care Learning Center Phase 1 • $469,000 for the Yakima County Veterans Dental Facility Transportation Budget : • $1 Million for 72nd & Washington Roundabout. • $650,000 for 48th & Washington Intersection Improvements. • Hazardous Substances Tax Increase Proviso (5993) was attached to both of the above projects, bill was passed to raise Hazardous Substances Tax. • $250,000 for feasibility study of an east-west intercity passenger rail system, including a Stampede Pass corridor alignment that might include City of Yakima. • Terrace Heights Transit Extension received $191,000 in one-time money in House Proposal, but none in final version. Thank You Very Much For This Wonderful Opportunity We look forward to answering your questions .L�ul¢e �¢�vi ✓V' .�ede�cici 20 Yakima City Council Strategic Priorities Monthly Council update August 22, 2019 1. Fiscal Sustainability Immediately following the January 12'h Saturday planning meeting, staff prepared a 3-year Budget Plan to achieve the policy fund balance target by 2023. The 3- Year Plan was communicated to council in a memo in the February 5'h regular council meeting agenda, outlining how budgeting a savings of$675,000 per year in 2020, 2021, and 2022 would achieve that target (attached for reference). By monitoring revenues and managing expenditures to budget and course- correcting to stay on track the current year (2019) is being managed to absorb events such as the February snow event, the weak 1' Quarter Sales Tax receipts, the delayed energy-saving LED installation project, and overtime/vacancies in various departments. This activity is not unique to this year; budget adoption is the single most critical success factor in setting the long- term course of fiscal sustainability for the city and the second most critical factor is managing to that budget through unexpected difficulties. 8/1/2019 UPDATE: At the end of 2nd Quarter 2019, revenues continue to be monitored and expenditures managed to budget and course-correcting to absorb events such as the February snow event, weak 1st Quarter Sales Tax receipts, the delayed energy-saving LED installation project, and overtime/vacancies in various departments. 2nd Quarter Sales Tax receipts improved, increasing slightly over prior year, but cumulatively are not yet on track to hit end-of-year budget target. As the 2nd Quarter Financial Update to council reports, cumulative General Fund revenues are at 49.6% and expenses are at 46.3% at the halfway point for the year. Budget adoption is the single most critical success factor in setting the long-term course of fiscal sustainability for the city and the second most critical factor is managing to that budget through unexpected difficulties. The January 2019 strategic priority to achieve the policy fund balance target by 2023 remains the objective to achieve in 2020 Budget planning; budgeting a savings of $675,000 per year in 2020, 2021, and 2022 would achieve that target. Staff is forecasting 2020 revenues based on current actuals as each month adds new data so that next year's budget has a basis in historical trend and the most current information. 2. Main/Arterial Street Development • Transportation Benefit District established in 2018 ($20 Car Tab Fee) • N. 1st St Revitalization Project Phase 1 —construction started in March 2019 and will be completed by November 2019. 21 • River Road Improvement 34'h Ave to 40'h Ave — construction started in April 2019 and will be completed by August 2019 to coincide with the completion of the new YMCA Aquatic/Fitness Center. 8/21/19 UPDATE: Project 95% complete • City-wide LED Lighting Upgrade Project- 2017 • Lighting upgraded to LED along main arterials (City owned metal poles) approximately 2,400 lights. 3. Community Policing Forthe remainder of June, 2019 there are safety patrol presentations scheduled at Summitview Elementary School and Whitney Elementary School. These events are when officers and community service employees interact with school children who participate as school crossing guards during the year. The students are recognized for their achievements in service to their school. Community Services are working with Yakima Footprinters to create public service announcements which will be aired on local radio stations. These radio announcements are designed to allow our department to market ourselves in the community. On Saturday, June 15, 2019, department members to include Lieutenant Pollard will participate in C.A.S.T for Kids at Sarg Hubbard Pond. The event is designed to provide children with disabilities to enjoy fishing with community members. This is an excellent opportunity for our department members to interact with the community. The officers who attend volunteer for this opportunity. Saturday, June 22 and Sunday, June 23, 2019, Yakima Police Officers and Community Services personnel will attend the 17th Annual Hot Shots 3-on-3 Tournament. This will be a combination of enforcement and positive community interactions. The department will have an opportunity to interact with local community members as well as those who have chosen to visit Yakima to be a part of the tournament. In addition, there will be a recruiting booth at the event with the hopes of attracting applicants to the department. On June 20, 2019, we will host a Block Watch meeting at Cornerstone Apartments at 1210 S. 72nd Avenue. This exhibits our ongoing support of community members taking an active role in making their own communities safer. On June 21, 2019, Community Services and Yakima Police Officers will support the City of Moxee with their National Night Out event. The coordinator of the event, Jan Hutchinson, asked for our department to assist with this event. Jan Hutchinson has been a huge supporter of the Yakima Police Department until she moved from the city. This is an opportunity to interact with members outside of our city, share our knowledge and support a 22 local agency. All police agencies in the valley must work together to make the entire county a safer place. The Yakima Police Department will host a blood drive on July I. This blood drive benefits our community by department and community members donating blood which will be used for lifesaving measures when emergencies arise. Yakima Police Officers and Community Service personnel will attend the Terrace Heights Baptist Church Hero Nights event on July 10, 2019. This event allows community members to meet local community heroes. The event advertises free family summer block parties. Again, this event falls just outside the city limits of Yakima, but it supports the Yakima County Sheriffs Office and allows for our officers to interact positively with those who live just outside the city limits as well as city residents who attend the event. On July 12, 2019, Yakima Police will continue with their reading events held at the West Valley Library. This allows officers the opportunity to read children's books to kids at the library. After the reading of the books, the officers interact with the children as they work on arts and crafts projects. On July 27, 2019, Community Services and Yakima Police Officers plan to participate in the Health and Safety Fair sponsored by Congressman Newhouse. This event allows department members to interact with community members. On August 6, 2019, staff will participate in the National Night Out against Crime events. The officers will visit several block parties and community events during this night. The officers are able to travel throughout the city and attend multiple events during their shifts. Community members are able to share their concerns and positive comments with officers during the social encounters. In working with our community policing model, this will allow "Beat Officers" to interact with the residents of their beats in a positive manner. In addition to the listed events, the department will continue to schedule and host Roll Call Barbeques, Coffee with a Cop and Meet Your District Officer events at least once a month. These events are often scheduled when requests are submitted to the department. As previously stated, the scheduling of events is fluid and periodically changes based on unforeseen circumstances. The department hopes to expand their use of social media in the coming months which will help keep community members informed of upcoming events as well as document events that already occurred. In addition, we hope to increase the use of social media to disseminate information on emergency situations and other ongoing situations within the City of Yakima. 4. Safe Route to Schools 8121119 UPDATE: Update study session scheduled for August 29 23 • 2040 Transportation System Plan (2017) • City of Yakima 2040 Comprehensive Plan (2017) • City of Yakima Bicycle Master Plan (2018) • Transit Development Plan (2018) • Highway and Street System (2018) • Pedestrian System (2018) • Bike System (2018) • Title 12, 15 and Subdivision Development Standards • The requirement of developers providing sidewalks as part of all new and improved development is ongoing. • City's LED Street Lighting Upgrade Project(2017) • Project to resume in June and is scheduled to be completed by Fall 2019 8121119 UPDATE: project anticipated to resume in September and scheduled for completion Spring 2020. Talks DES and Ameresco to determine final cost must occur first. The fire department worked together with public works to replace the parking lot lights that cover the parking and training area with LED light fixtures to conserve energy. • Transportation Benefit District Projects (2018) - Sidewalk Improvements: • Naches Ave. Sidewalk Project (Walnut to Pacific) —started in 2018 and will continue through 2019 to remove problematic trees that are disrupting sidewalks, replant acceptable trees, repair sidewalks, and add ADA ramps. 8/21/19 UPDATE: Work continues on ADA ramp installation. Tree replacement to occur this fall. • 4'h Street Sidewalk Project (Walnut to Pacific) —will start in 2019 to remove problematic trees that are disrupting sidewalks, replant acceptable trees, repair sidewalks, and add ADA ramps. 8/21/19 UPDATE: Trees removed. Sidewalk work to begin next spring. • Mead Ave Sidewalk Project (27'h Ave to 28'h Ave) —will start in 2019 to remove problematic trees that are disrupting sidewalks, replant acceptable trees, repair sidewalks, and add ADA ramps. 8/21/19 UPDATE: Project to start 2020 Engineering acquiring ROW from adjacent property. • YMC Chapter 8.96 - Complete Streets Policy 2019 Projects: • Installation of sidewalk on the south side of Swan Avenue from McGuiness Park to Campbell Lane (tie into sidewalk installed as part of Garfield Safe Routes To Schools (SRTS) project. 24 • Installation of sidewalk on Race Street between 8'h Street and Naches Avenue (tie into sidewalk installed as part of Adams/Washington SRTS project). • Installation of sidewalk on the south side of Prasch Avenue from 20'h Avenue to 16'h Avenue (tie into sidewalk installed as part of the McClure Elementary SRTS project). • Installation of sidewalk on the south side of Viola from 10'h Avenue to 4'h Avenue (adjacent to Hoover Elementary). • Installation of sidewalk on the west side of Powerhouse Road from Robertson Elementary to Englewood Avenue. • Yakima Transit Sidewalk Policy Issue (2017 and 2018) • 2017/2018 - Sidewalk installed along the east side of 40'h Ave. north of Chestnut. This project complimented the crosswalk at the intersection of 40'h Ave and Chestnut installed in 2017. 8/21/19 UPDATE: Complete • Sidewalk Condition Assessment(2017) • The condition data is continuously utilized by staff to identify and prioritize future sidewalk repair projects. The information is also used for grant applications. • Traffic-Calming Policy(2018) • A new Traffic-Calming Policy was approved by City Council in 2018. Currently 20 traffic-calming requests are the process of being evaluated. 8/21/19 UPDATE: Currently 28 request, first installation scheduled for fall 2019 • Safe Routes To Schools (Grant Program) Recently completed Safe Routes to Schools Projects: • Adams/Washington School Sidewalks —2018. Installed sidewalk, ADA-compliant sidewalk ramps and crosswalks at various locations around the schools; relocated the school flashers to cover a larger area. The total project cost $380,000; Safe Routes to Schools grant was $357,000. • West Valley Middle School Vicinity Improvements —2016. Installed sidewalk on the south side of Zier Road from 72'Avenue to 75'h Avenue, and installed a traffic signal at the intersection of 72' Avenue and Mead Avenue. The total project cost $604,393.20; Safe Routes to Schools grant was $544,000. Other completed projects that improved sidewalk/ramps in the vicinity of Elementary Schools: 25 • Lincoln Avenue Corridor Safety—2016. Installed 5-foot wide sidewalk and ADA-compliant sidewalk ramps on the north side of Lincoln Avenue between 24'h Avenue and 32' Avenue. The total project cost $482,076.10. The Highway Safety Improvement Project (HSIP) grant was for$440,000. • Citywide Safety Improvements — 2014. This project installed 50 ADA- compliant sidewalk ramps on 16'h Avenue between Nob Hill Boulevard and Lincoln Avenue. The total project cost $451,461.50; HSIP grant was for$400,000. Current Safe Routes to Schools Projects: • Garfield Elementary- $200,000 ($180,000 SRTS Grant; $20,000 Gas Tax) o Installation of sidewalk and ramps along east side of Campbell Lane from Jerome to Willow o Installation of curb, gutter, sidewalk and ramps and stormwater treatment system on the west side of 6'h Ave from Jerome to Willow o Improving roadway crossings and installing flashers o Making Jerome Ave (East) and Fairbanks (West) become "one-way" streets 8121119 UPDATE: Complete Progress: o All of the right-of-way required for this project was acquired in 2018 o Pacific Power has been notified about their need to relocate their poles on Campbell Lane and we have been assured that this will be completed prior to summer 8121119 UPDATE: Pacific Power has set their new poles —waiting for communication utility to relocate their cables. o Nelson Construction was awarded the bid; City Council approved at the January 15'h City Council meeting 8121119 UPDATE: 95% complete Public meeting was held at Garfield Elementary on May 29'h The construction start date is June 17, 2019; completed in August 2019. • McClure Elementary- $300,000 ($270,000 SRTS Grant; $30,000 Gas Tax) o Replacing and constructing sidewalk and ramps. o Constructing sidewalk and ramps on Lila Avenue between Karr Avenue and 24th Avenue. o Improving roadway crossings and installing a rectangular rapid flashing beacon at the crossing of 24th Avenue and Viola Avenue. All of the right-of-way required for this project will be acquired in 2019. The completion date is estimated to be August 2020. 26 The City also applied for two other Safe Routes to School grants this past spring. If successful, notification should be received by June 2019. 8121119 UPDATE: Unsuccessful in getting a grant this year They are: 1. McKinley Elementary School —This proposed Safety Improvements project in the vicinity of McKinley Elementary consists of the installation of a High intensity Activated Cross Walk (HAWK) pedestrian crossing signal at the intersection of Tieton Drive and 13'h Avenue; replacement of damaged sections of sidewalk on MacLaren Street, 12'h Avenue and 13'h Avenue; installation of ADA ramps and crosswalks at various intersections; and the installation of a bike rack at the school. 2. Apple Valley Elementary School —This proposed 88'h Avenue Sidewalk project in the vicinity of Apple Valley Elementary would include: installing curb, gutter and sidewalk on the east side of 88'h Avenue between Tieton Drive and Summitview Avenue; installing ADA ramps at various intersections; installing raised crosswalks across 88'h Avenue north of Chestnut Avenue and north of Barge Street; and installing a bike rack at the school. Priority Projects (2020 Safe Route To Schools Application Process): • Robertson Elementary — Englewood Ave. both to the east and west of Powerhouse Rd. are heavily utilized by students. This is extremely dangerous as there is no curb or gutter to separate the roadway from the shoulder. The same occurs along Powerhouse Rd. south of Englewood Ave. • Hoover Elementary— No sidewalks at Hoover Elementary. Observations indicate that students are heading in all four directions; will need to determine where the students live in order to determine the highest use locations for sidewalk installation. • Nob Hill Elementary— The School District is concerned with the lack of sidewalk along 32'Ave near Nob Hill Elementary and the speed of traffic. Staff has meet with YSD in September 2018 and again in June 2019 to define the scope of work of SRTS projects and to continue to prioritize projects. 5. Youth Development Community Centers: • February 19, 2019 - Entered into an agreement with OIC for the operation and maintenance of the Henry Beauchamp Community Center • March 19, 2019 - Entered into an agreement with YPAL for the operation and maintenance of the Washington Fruit Community Center 27 • June 4, 2019 - Entered into an agreement with YPAL for$75,000 CDBG funding for youth programming and services at the Washington Fruit Community Center • June 4, 2019 - Entered into an agreement with OIC for $75,000 CDBG funding for youth programming and services at the Henry Beauchamp Community Center Beyond the Bell Program (2018/2019) • Costume Party • Winter Party • Valentines Party • Treasure Egg Hunt • End of the Year Party! • Conference Week 12-6 pm November 5th -9th March 25th-29th • Community Literacy Yakima Valley Library Books Junior Volunteers Read Books to Participants • Washington State University Health and Nutrition Made and prepared fresh healthy snacks Incorporated physical activity • Program Enrichment Recreation Activities Teambuilding Games Social Skills Arts & Crafts Homework Assistance • Junior Volunteer Program 7 Jr Volunteers Assists with arts & crafts Homework and reading assistance Mentoring & Leadership • BELL BUCK$ Incentive program to earn Bell Buck$ and purchase items at our store • 118 Beyond the Bell Participants • 16 Middle School Youth Volunteers • 134 Youth Participants Kissel Park Summer Day Camp (2018) • Kissel Park Summer Day Camp June 18th —August 17'h 9:00 am to 4:00 pm 28 Youth 5— 11 years 8121119 UPDATE: averaged 90 participants per day • Program Enrichment Recreation Activities Teambuilding Games Sports Social Skills Arts & Crafts • Weekly trips to Franklin Pool • Dental Delta Youth Oral Health • Community Literacy Yakima Valley Library Books Staff and Community Volunteers Read Books to Participants • Junior Volunteer Program 10 Jr Volunteers 8121119 UPDATE: up to 15 volunteers Assists with Arts & Crafts Mentoring and Leadership Gang Reduction & Intervention Task(GRIT) Force • Passed a Charter and Bylaws for the GRIT Force which provides the permanent structure and strategic governing body. The make-up of the governing body includes representatives from law enforcement, health care, government and a former gang-involved individual. • The Village—the community of stakeholders, interested parties and collaborators—has met every two months to hear presentations on relevant topics and network across sectors to work towards filling gaps and providing opportunities for Yakima's youth. • A public education campaign was completed which included one hour radio interviews on Radio KDNA over the course of three months on relevant topics including gang indicators, ACEs, and youth programming. Concurrent advertisements and short interviews were done on Townsquare Media platforms. • Ten students participated in the Yakima Youth Leadership Program pilot project—in partnership with ESD 105 and the Yakima School District—at Franklin and Lewis & Clark Middle Schools. These ten students had the opportunity to work one-on-one with a coach who provided education on a variety of topics including communication skills, drug and alcohol awareness, gang awareness, and conflict resolution. The coach also conducted attendance challenges which increased attendance and decreased tardiness in the participants. As part of the pilot program, we are collecting data from the participants, their families and school staff to evaluate the effectiveness and impact of the short pilot program. An 29 independent researcher, with help from a Stanford University intern, is consulting to evaluate and analyze the data collected. • The City was awarded a Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) grant to work with youth and provide mental health services, life and job skills training, health services, and recovery support. This grant is being administered in partnership with ESD 105 and Comprehensive Health Care at the ESD 105 Open Doors facility. • The City participated in the drafting of, and submitted a letter in support of, OIC's application for an OJJDP mentorship grant for youth, including middle school youth, who have been in the juvenile justice system and are low-risk offenders. The grant award has not yet been announced. • The City submitted an OJJDP grant for Youth Gang Suppression Implementation programs. If awarded, this grant would pay a portion of the costs to continue and expand the Yakima Youth Leadership Program for three years, and expand it to all four Yakima School District middle schools. The grant award has not yet been announced. Both OJJDP grants are anticipated to be awarded in August of 2019. 6. Mill Site Development • Secure street right-of-way (ROW) within the former Boise Cascade Mill Redevelopment property in 2019. 7/23/19 UPDATE: following Uniform Relocation Act requirements as necessary. • Finalize approval by Department of Ecology for the Interim Action Work Plan (IAWP) which specifies MSW removal, remediation and clean-up activities of landfill material under the road corridor. 7/23/19 UPDATE: Final draft submitted to DOE on Jul 10, 2019. Our DOE project staff left the agency and now the city is working with Section Manager. 8/21/2019 UPDATE: IAWP should be finally approved very soon, after which the required public comment period will begin. • Get clean up estimate for IAWP which includes tipping fees, hauling and handling of MSW. 8/21/2019 UPDATE: Volumes of municipal solid waste and wood waste materials to be removed have been calculated and cost estimates for removal, disposal and replacement with fill are estimated at approximately thirteen million dollars for preparing r-o-wfor road construction. • Finalize street design plans design cross sections, engineering cost estimates and surveys. 7/23/19 UPDATE: Finalize street design plans for Bravo Company Boulevard and H Street which is responsive to public comments from the 30 April 2019 public meeting. Adjustments made to the lane layout and bicycle facilities. • Consider a "value engineering" process for Bravo Co Boulevard if cost estimate exceeds budget. Consider phasing of project. 7/23/19 UPDATE: City street responsibilities will be constructed in three phases. • Prepare bid documents. 7/23/19 UPDATE: Prepare bid documents for potential 2nd Quarter 2020 project process. • Work with Finance to be ready to bond Bravo Co Boulevard in early 2020. An estimated $17 Million in LIFT available. • Support and coordinate with Yakima County in NEPA review of East-West Corridor review. Target for Final NEPA document by January 2020. 7/23/19 UPDATE: Public meeting scheduled for September 2019. • After ROW is secured, apply for crossing permit from BNSF/Central Washington Railroad (crossing permit may take one year). • Work with Department of Ecology and legislative delegation to get Capital budget contribution to the landfill clean up. 7/23/19 UPDATE: This is a critical path item. Work with property owners to ensure coordination in project development after street construction. 7. Homelessness/Affordable Housing • Review"Resolution of Intent" process for City of Yakima to take advantage of funding from newly passed State legislation "1406" which may generate an estimated annual revenue of$143,000. 8/22/2019 UPDATE: Council approved the resolution of intent to adopt legislation imposing the 1406 tax recovery for affordable housing issues. Next step will be to present an ordinance that imposes the tax recovery; coordinating presentation of ordinance with County efforts in order to maximize the effective tax base from which the tax recovery will be calculated. • Review criteria for funding from newly passed "1923" which provides local funding for planning, community engagement and potentially other tasks related to affordable housing. 7/23/19 UPDATE: Yakima Planning Commissions is looking at some options. 8/22/19 UPDATE: The Department of Commerce grant opened on August 15, 2019. The grant application deadline is September 30, 2019. Planning 31 Staff is reviewing the grant application instructions and will be preparing the application materials. • Work with community partners including non-profit builders (such as Yakima Housing Authority, Catholic Charities, Farmworker Housing, Habitat for Humanity), private organizations (such as the Central Washington Homebuilders, Landlord Association, Northwest Justice Project) and other community groups to build strong alliances and a community approach to solving our housing shortage. • Explore regulatory options that could encourage residential infill throughout all neighborhoods in the City of Yakima. The Yakima Planning Commission is currently developing recommendations. 7/23/19 UPDATE: SEPA threshold increases, additional zones and lower level review. • Explore financial incentives that would assist in the development of below market rate housing to meet the growing needs of low to moderate income families and residents. • Assist the Housing Authority to obtain more rent vouchers for area families. • Review options to increase the inventory of land available for multi-family housing. 7/23/19 UPDATE: Additional zones, lower levels of review, SEPA in fill exemption in CBD, GC, and R3 zones adjacent to arterials. • Explore flexibility in Building Code requirements that would encourage mixed use developments in existing structures. • Review Opportunity Zones for funding of affordable housing projects. • Evaluate CDBG and HOME funds to ensure the City of Yakima is maximizing funds for preservation of housing and new construction. • Evaluate the International Property Maintenance Code to determine if code enforcement can improve housing conditions in the community without displacing low income families who have no other housing options. • Explore Community Trusts or Community Land Banking to develop an alternative mechanism for funding affordable housing or land acquisition. • Participate in Homeless Network and Homeless Coalition to support agencies and community efforts to address homeless ness. 32 • Work with Yakima County in the development of a facility to address homeless housing and case management at the City owned property on East Nob Hill Blvd near the Wastewater plant. • Support Camp Hope in providing a location for low barrier emergency shelter and work toward a more permanent solution. 8. Airport Expansion The Yakima Air Terminal-McAllister Field provides vital transportation services within Yakima County. In 2012, Washington State Department of Transportation Aviation Division conducted an economic impact study which estimates that the airport contributes approximately $112 million annually within the region. Given the impacts within the community, the Economic Development Committee identified the airport as a priority in order to continue expansion efforts to meet transportation demands. Since October 2018, the airport has been successful in attracting and expanding both aviation and non-aviation businesses. In May, Cub Crafters announced the intent to sublease with the option to purchase a large hangar to expand their aircraft manufacturing facilities. This facility has opened the door for additional expansion on the south side of the airport along 21 st Ave and Airport Lane. Additionally, this facility will allow Cub Crafters to hire additional staff for aircraft manufacturing, which will provide jobs within the valley. In April, McCormick Air Center in conjunction with airport staff, were successful in attracting the Washington State Department of Natural Resources aviation department to the Yakima Airport. Currently, DNR leases facilities to house two Bell UH-1 H helicopters and associated air and ground crews to support the growing demands of wildfires within the Yakima Valley. Given the critical support McCormick Air Center provides the air crews, they are exploring the potential of adding a third aircraft to be housed at the Yakima Airport. As aviation activities continue to expand at the airport, the demand for aircraft storage has exceeded current inventory levels. In order to meet these demands, McCormick Air Center has been working with airport staff on identifying additional facilities which will occupy approximately 61,467 square feet to accommodate another 12 aircraft. This area has the potential of expanding by another 36,777 square feet in order to add another 7 aircraft when future demand warrants. Planned construction of this additional facility is to begin by August and be available in spring of 2020. In October 2018, due to FedEx's growing demand for package delivery within the Yakima Valley, they have worked with airport staff and the Federal Aviation Administration to expand their vehicle parking to provide 30 additional parking stalls for delivery trucks. This parking expansion added approximately 29,083 square feet of property leased from the airport. In addition, the increased demand has warranted a larger cargo aircraft in order to transport the increased freight from the Yakima Valley. This not only secures additional jobs but also provides the community the opportunity to ship larger items from the airport. 33 Since October, airport staff has met with military personnel in order to secure another large military exercise at the Yakima Airport similar to the event in 2017. This exercise is scheduled to operate during September, where military units throughout the world will convene in Yakima to test their ability to respond to large future disasters including the projected Cascadia Subduction event. Approximately 150 troops will be stationed at the airport where many of them will depend on the community's resources (i.e. Hotels, restaurants, rental cars, airport facilities etc.) to support their mission. As the airport continues to diversify businesses located on airport property, airport staff met with two businesses who have signed agreements to construct an espresso shop and restaurant. The first business is Castle Coffee, where a lease has been signed in order to construct an espresso shop at the northwest corner of 24'h and Washington Avenues adjacent to the terminal building. This will provide the community the option to purchase coffees and pastry's as well as offer a critical service to our passenger who arrive and depart the airport terminal building. Construction is slated to begin in July 2019 and be open for service beginning early 2020. The other business is Staci's Catering, which has executed a lease agreement to operate out of the airport's original terminal building located along 16'h Avenue and Valley Mall Boulevard. This business will provide Cub Crafters, McAllister Museum, and pilots with a dining option on-airport. This location is a favorite among the community as it provides the opportunity for diners to witness aircraft landing and taking off. The facilities are currently being remodeled with an anticipated opening date in July 2019. These expansion efforts have not only met the aviation industry's demands it also has provided the community with essential services. Additionally, these activities will provide a positive impact on the valley's local economy by producing jobs as well as increase spending within the Valley. 9. City Facilities (pools and community centers) • Staff conducted a Community Facilities Tour on January 29, 2019. (Franklin Pool, Lions Pool, WFCC and HBCC). • Have met several times with the Ad Hoc Committee; getting direction as to what is required within the Statement For Qualifications (RFQ) in developing a Master Plan for each facility. • March 13, 2019 Parks Commission Meeting — presentation on Martin Luther King Jr. Park Community Swimming Pool Feasibility Study by Councilman-Hunsaker. Discussed what elements were important in designing the pool. • Ad Hoc Committee meeting held on March 13, 2019 to discuss with Councilman- Hunsaker what elements were important in designing the MLK Jr. outdoor pool. • Developed RFQs for Franklin Pool, Lions Pool, WFCC and HBCC. • Held Aquatic Master Plan interviews on May 14, 2019; selecting the local firm KDF Architecture to develop Master Plans for both Franklin Pool and Lions Pool. 34 • RFQ's for the two community centers were sent out on May 28, 2019. 8/21/19 UPDATE: Cost for Master Plan development is double the amount allocated. Visit with Council about direction scheduled. • Public Meeting held on June 12, 2019 at both the HBCC and City Hall (Parks Commission meeting) to discuss and obtain input on the design schematics of the proposed MLK Jr. outdoor pool. Presented by Councilman-Hunsaker. • Ad Hoc Committee meeting held on June 13, 2019 to discuss and obtain input on the design schematics of the proposed MLK Jr. outdoor pool. Presented by Councilman-Hunsaker. 8121119 UPDATE: Eight Community Outreach events regarding the Franklin and Lions Pool Master Plans were held in July and August of 2019 to connect with the community on their thoughts about swimming pools in Yakima. Park and Recreation staff along with KDA Architects staff conducted surveys with people at Downtown Summer Nights, Franklin Park concerts, Miller Park and MLK Jr. Park concerts and at the Downtown Yakima Farmers Markets. A total of 18 hours were spent reaching out to the community. Surveys were also available for people to complete online. Over 400 surveys were completed. The data is being tabulated currently and will be given to KDA Architects for inclusion in the Master Plan documents for each pool. 10. Downtown Destination "Move to adopt as the downtown definition; to identify and update the essential concepts, land use, transportation and implementation framework elements for the core commercial area for the Central Business District along Yakima Ave and surrounding vicinity." Councilmember White The Downtown Master Plan divides the study area into distinctive 'centers' that support and strengthen existing assets— historic buildings, development patterns, and existing attractors. Tactics: 1. City Center • Private investment is focused around a multi-purpose public plaza that will provide a location for year-round civic gatherings • Focus of retail opportunities are concentrated along Chestnut, Front and Second serving as the center of street-oriented retail activity not only for the study area but all of the City of Yakima • Existing uses such as the Yakima Mall, government services and theatres are integrated and strengthened or re-purposed 2. Boulevard 35 • Yakima Avenue is enhanced to prioritize the pedestrian from Front to Naches; special consideration and emphasis is given to intersection crosswalks to ensure that areas north and south of Yakima are seamlessly integrated • Additional greenery is added to 'humanize' the street; a median and curbside landscaping are featured 3. District Center • Hubs of retail activity are established outside the City Center at key intersections where pedestrian — and street-oriented development patterns exist • Centers are envisioned to include specialty uses, 'incubator' or similar uses that support but do not compete with the City Center 4. Parkway • Parkways have a greater emphasis on 'mobility'- movement through the district rather than an emphasis on creating a destination • Along these street segments, the median is omitted to accommodate a continuous left turn lane for essential mid-block access to existing auto- oriented uses; Curbside landscaping is enhanced o "Downtown Evaluation" memorandum dated February 28, 2019 submitted for the Economic Development Committee meeting. Identifying both short and long- term goals and objectives primarily looking at the streets, sidewalks and landscaping of the Downtown core area, in order to determine a plan of action to bring it back to City standards. Short term: • Traffic Signals— upgrade aging signals • Evaluate Irrigation system, valve by valve to detect leaks- many undetected leaks under sidewalks • Identify and repair broken sections of sidewalk • City Arborist to evaluate problem trees/sidewalks • Evaluate Street conditions (PCI Study) — 2020 Budget • Evaluate aging sanitary sewer system • Evaluate stormwater system • Upgrade Public Parking lot on 3' Ave across from YPD- update lighting, signage, asphalt and fence. • Evaluate pedestrian lighting • Audit of signage- update/eliminate signage clutter in downtown area • Special color coded signs signifying Downtown area (visitors) • Evaluate for ADA compliance • Evaluate medians with landscaping- plan/install low water use gardens • Evaluate efficiency of watering system for hanging baskets • Code Enforcement — litter, weeds Long term: 36 • Traffic Signals— System Program to Sync up • Redesign/Update Irrigation system • Complete Grind/ Overlay of Yakima Ave • Installation of additional pedestrian lighting • Eliminate stamped concrete- possibly replace with pavers for easier maintenance • Replace water lines, services, & fire hydrants- mains are fairly old and/or undersized • Upgrade sanitary sewer • Upgrade/Upsize stormwater system • Install Mid-block pedestrian crossings with islands • Eliminate electrical boxes on trees/replace with sidewalk lighting • Implement low water use gardens throughout Downtown area • Plant proper type of trees along sidewalks o Conducted a meeting with the Downtown Association of Yakima (DAY) on March 8'h to get their perspective and input. • Tree lighting Removal of any existing lights, repair/diagnose electrical issue with outlets, reinstall lights. Estimated completion October 2019. • Rock/landscape projects Introduce/remove plants, repair/establish irrigation, weed barrier, overlay w/1.5' chip rock 1. Millennium Plaza parking lot—within 2' St, Chestnut, 3' St borders 2. Planter on So 2' St— approx. mid-block between Chestnut and Yakima Ave., West side of 2' St. 3. Parking lot planters— SE corner 1st St and SSPW 4. Various small planter areas — SW and NE corners 2' St/SSPW. NE corner Yakima Ave/Naches. SE corner 3' SUMLK, SE corner 4'h St /MLK. 5. POSSIBLE - Planters cornering Yakima County courthouse Estimated completion November 2019. o Infrastructure Evaluation Utilities (Water/Irrigation/Wastewater/Stormwater) evaluating each of the aging infrastructures to determine replacement and upsizing requirements to meet future needs. Also determining cost estimates. O In the process of hiring a City Engineer