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06/24/2019 03 City Manager UpdateB US INE S S O F T HE C I T Y C O UNC I L YAK I M A, WAS HING T O N AG E ND A S TAT E M E NT I tem No. 3. F or Meeting of: J une 24, 2019 I T E M T IT L E :City Manager update S UB M IT T E D B Y:Cliff Moore, City Manager S UM M ARY E X P L ANAT I O N: City Manager Update I tems: 1. Cruise insurance issue 2. B anning plastic straws and S tyrofoam 3. S HB 1406 – affordable and supportive housing—local sales and use tax 4. Downtown definition 5. S trategic Plan updates I T E M B UD G E T E D: S T RAT E G I C P RI O RI T Y: AP P RO V E D F O R S UB M IT TAL :City Manager S TAF F RE C O M M E ND AT IO N: B O ARD/C O M M I T T E E RE C O M M E ND AT IO N: AT TAC HM E NT S : Description Upload Date Type cruising 6/19/2019 Cover Memo staff rec SHB 1406 6/20/2019 Cover Memo SHB 1406 6/20/2019 Cover Memo update dt master 6/19/2019 Cover Memo strategic priorities update 6/20/2019 Cover Memo 1 MEMORANDUM To: Cliff Moore, City Manager From: Joan Davenport, Director of Community Development Colleda Monick, Community Development Specialist Sara Watkins, Senior Assistant City Attorney Date: June 19, 2019 Subject: City Council Briefing on Cruise Events and Insurance Requirements A concern was expressed at a recent City Council meeting by a Cruise Event organizer with some questions and frustrations related to the cost of event insurance. Attached are the Yakima Municipal Code sections that address cruise events and the insurance regulations (YMC 9.25; YMC 9.70.160 and YMC 9.70.170). As you will read in YMC 9.25(C) that Cruise events are deemed “Special Events” for the purpose of permitting and insurance regulations. The Municipal Code was amended in 2013 related to cruising. The Municipal Code was amended in 2012 and 2015 with respect to Special events. No specific changes have been made related to insurance requirements in recent years. If the Council wishes to review insurance requirements of Cruising or other Special Events, please direct a meeting to be set to include the Legal Department and our insurance carrier to advise the City of appropriate insurance trends and risks associated with special events. 2 Chapter 9.25 CRUISING CONTROL Sections: 9.25.010 Cruising prohibited. 9.25.020 Cruising permitted—Open cruising event. 9.25.010 Cruising prohibited. A. No person shall drive or permit a motor vehicle under that person’s care, custody or control to be driven past a traffic-control point more than two times in the same direction of travel within a two-hour period in or around a posted no cruising area so as to contribute to traffic congestion, obstruction of streets, sidewalks or parking lots, impediment of access to shops, restaurants or other buildings open to the public, or interference with the use of property or the conduct of business in the area adjacent thereto, except as provided in YMC 9.25.020. B. The police chief or his designee shall determine when an area has become so congested by traffic as to present a danger of traffic congestion, obstruction of streets, sidewalks or parking lots, impediment of access to shops, restaurants or other buildings open to the public, or interference with the use of property or conduct of business in the area adjacent thereto or that emergency vehicles cannot respond in that area within a reasonable period of time. The police chief or his designee shall then direct that the no cruising signs shall be erected or installed and maintained until the congestion has lessened to an appreciable degree. The chief of police may declare all or a portion of any street or way open to the public to be a no cruising area when: 1. Traffic congestion has slowed average vehicle speed to less than two-thirds the posted speed limit and the congestion is caused in whole or in substantial part by cruising; and 2. The congestion significantly interferes with passage of vehicles being driven to and from locations within the area; or 3. In areas which contain transit routes, buses or trolleys are or would be substantially delayed; or 4. The congestion is likely to prevent or substantially delay emergency vehicles from responding to locations within the area, or from passing through the area. 3 The designation of a street or way open to the public as a no cruising area shall remain in effect for a period of four hours, unless withdrawn earlier or extended for additional four-hour periods by the chief of police. C. At every point where a public street becomes or provides ingress to a no cruising area, there shall be posted a sign which reads as follows: “NO CRUISING AREA.” No person shall drive or permit a motor vehicle under that person’s care, custody or control to be driven past a traffic-control point more than two times in the same direction of travel within a two-hour period in or around this area. D. A “traffic-control point” as used in this section means any point or points established by the police department for the purpose of monitoring cruising within a designated no cruising area. E. No violation shall occur except upon the third passage of a motor vehicle by the same traffic-control point in the same direction of travel within the aforementioned two-hour period. F. This section shall not apply to in-service emergency vehicles, police vehicles, taxicabs for hire, buses, trolleys and other vehicles being driven for business purposes. G. Penalty. A violation of this chapter shall be an infraction subject to a penalty of one hundred dollars. (Ord. 2005-20 § 1, 2005: Ord. 94-10 § 1, 1994). 9.25.020 Cruising permitted—Open cruising event. A. Cruising shall be permitted by the public during an open cruising event on Yakima Avenue from six p.m. to ten p.m. on Saturday evenings designated pursuant to resolution adopted by the city council from time to time. B. For calendar year 2013, the following dates are designated open cruising events: Saturday, June 22, 2013; Saturday, July 20, 2013; and Saturday, September 14, 2013. C. For any additional open cruising event or events to take place in 2013, and for any designation of open cruising events occurring in subsequent years, such designation shall be made pursuant to resolutions adopted from time to time by the city council. Such additional open cruising events occurring in 2013 or in subsequent years shall be deemed special events subject to the provisions of Chapter 9.70 YMC. D. Following adoption of any resolution designating an open cruising event on Yakima Avenue, the designated open cruising event dates, with identification of the resolution designating such event, shall be posted on the city web site, and may be published in any other manner deemed appropriate. (Ord. 2013-018 § 1 (Exh. A), 2013: Ord. 2010-23 § 1, 2010: Ord. 2009-16 § 1, 2009: Ord. 2008-38 § 1, 2008: Ord. 2008-25 § 1, 4 2008: Ord. 2007-38 § 1, 2007: Ord. 2007-23 § 1, 2007: Ord. 2006-14 § 1, 2006: Ord. 2005-76 § 1, 2005: Ord. 2005-20 § 2, 2005). 9.70.160 Insurance required to conduct special event. A. In addition to any other requirement(s) imposed by this chapter, for any parade or special event involving participation of persons in games or races involving physical effort; or involving the use of live animals, wild or domestic; or involving the use of vehicles (except wheelchairs); or provision or sale of beverages or food for human consumption; or use of alcoholic beverages, the applicant shall have the following minimum insurance requirements: 1. Commercial General Liability (Occurrence Form). One million dollars per occurrence/two million dollars aggregate combined single limit liability for bodily injury and property damage. If other than the standard CG 00 01 form is used, such as a special events policy, the policy shall be furnished to the city attorney for review and may be rejected based upon the specified policy exclusions. If animals are included in the event, no animal exclusion will be allowed or approved. The policy shall not contain a separate assault and battery exclusion. The policy shall not exclude coverage for participants in the event. 2. If sponsor owned or rented vehicles are involved in the event: automobile liability at one million dollars per occurrence combined single limit bodily injury and property damage. This includes coverage for any owned, hired or non-owned vehicles. If the sponsor of the event does not own the vehicles that will be used in the event, then only hired and non-owned auto liability may be required, which can be included on the commercial general liability policy. 3. If liquor is served at the event: liquor liability coverage shall be required at a one-million-dollar liability limit. If there is no charge for the liquor being served and the policy provides host liquor liability coverage, then this requirement may be waived with the economic development manager’s approval. 4. The applicant shall provide a certificate of insurance as proof of the insurance required above that clearly states who the provider is, the amount of coverage, the policy number, and when the policy and provisions provided are in effect. Said policy shall be in effect for the duration of the permit. The certificate of liability insurance policy shall name the city of Yakima, its elected officials, officers, agents, employees and volunteers as additional insureds, and shall contain a clause that the insurer will not 5 cancel the insurance without first giving the city prior written notice. The insurance shall be with an insurance company or companies rated A-VII or higher in Best’s Guide and admitted in the state of Washington, or an A-VII rated approved surplus lines carrier. If the city is damaged by the failure of the applicant to maintain the above insurance or to notify the city, then the applicant shall bear all costs attributable thereto. An expiration, cancellation, or revocation of the insurance policy or withdrawal of the insurer from the insurance policy automatically suspends the permit issued to the applicant until a new insurance policy or reinstatement notice has been filed and approved as provided in this section. B. No later than thirty days prior to the event, unless the economic development manager for good cause modifies the filing requirements, the applicant shall file with the economic development manager evidence of liability insurance coverage, for review by the city attorney. A complete copy of the policy will be furnished to the city attorney if requested. C. The applicant shall provide a signed statement that the applicant/responsible party shall pay the costs of services which the city of Yakima is required to perform by reason of management of street use of the parade or special event, including but not limited to cleanup. Upon completion of the parade or special event, the economic development manager shall compile a statement of account which shall be mailed to the applicant/responsible party, payable within thirty days. D. Waiver, Reduction or Increase of Required Limits. If the special event is of a demonstrated high or low risk category, according to recognized insurance and risk management standards, the economic development manager, on the advice of the city attorney or city’s risk manager, may authorize a greater or lesser amount of coverage than otherwise required, or may require a particular type of insurance coverage different from that specified in this section. E. As a further condition of the issuance of any permit, the applicant shall defend, indemnify, and hold harmless the city, its elected officials, officers, agents, employees and volunteers from and against any and all claims, causes of action, damages, losses, and expenses of any kind or nature whatsoever, including but not limited to attorney’s fees and court cost, arising out of, relating to or resulting from the parade or special event and/or the application for the parade or special event. F. The indemnification requirements set forth in this section shall not be construed to apply to events permitted under this chapter involving expressive activity which enjoys protection under the United States or Washington Constitutions except that sponsors of such events shall be required to redesign or reschedule the 6 permitted event to respond to specific risks, hazards and dangers to the public health and safety identified by the director of community and economic development as reasonably foreseeable consequences of the event. G. The insurance required by this section shall encompass all liability insurance requirements imposed for other permits required under other sections of this chapter and is to be provided for the benefit of the city and not as a duty, express or implied, to provide insurance protection for spectators or participants. (Ord. 2018-009 § 1 (part), 2018: Ord. 2015-043 § 1 (Exh. A) (part), 2015: Ord. 2013-043 § 1 (Exh. A), 2013: Ord. 2013-041 § 2 (part), 2013: Ord. 2012-61 § 2 (Exh. A) (part), 2012). 9.70.170 Waiver of insurance requirements. (a) Except for special events where the sale of alcoholic beverages is authorized, the insurance requirements of YMC 9.70.160 may be waived. In making the determination of whether to waive insurance, the city shall consider the following factors: (1) Whether it is an expressive activity special event governed by YMC 9.70.220; (2) Whether it is objectively impossible to obtain insurance coverage; (3) Whether the special event will involve the use of equipment (other than sound equipment), vehicles, animals, fireworks, or pyrotechnics; or (4) Whether a fee or donation is charged or required as a condition of admission or participation in the special event. (b) To claim that it is objectively impossible to obtain insurance coverage pursuant to this section, the applicant shall submit a statement from at least two independent licensed insurance brokers demonstrating the insurance is unavailable in the marketplace. (c) Even though insurance is waived, the city may require the event organizer of a special event to defend, indemnify, and hold harmless the city from any claim or liability arising from the special event. (Ord. 2018-009 § 1 (part), 2018: Ord. 2015-043 § 1 (Exh. A) (part), 2015: Ord. 2013-041 § 2 (part), 2013: Ord. 2012-61 § 2 (Exh. A) (part), 2012). 7 FINANCE TO: Mayor and City Council Cliff Moore, City Manager FROM: Jeff Cutter, City Attorney Steve Groom, Director of Finance and Budget DATE: June 20, 2019 RE: Staff Recommendation – HB 1406 Newly executed HB 1406 permits a City to authorize and recover a sales and use tax revenue in a percentage of up to 0.0073% of sales and use taxes collected from the City by the state. The revenue the City would receive would come to the City as a deduction from the sales and use tax otherwise collected by the State Department of Revenue. The text of the bill is attached. Staff recommends approving a resolution that would claim the opportunity available under the Bill for this revenue recovery source. This tax recovery may only be used for “acquiring, rehabilitating, or constructing affordable housing, which may include new units of affordable housing within an existing structure or facilities providing supportive housing services” or “funding the operations and maintenance costs of new units of affordable or supportive housing.” Currently, the total Sales tax in Yakima is 8.2%, of which the state is allocated 6.5% and the City 1.7%. The State already remits portions of its 6.5% to the City for various purposes such as the Sales Tax credit which we consider “additional” Lodging Tax. The County has expressed interest in imposing a .0073% tax imposition as well, which is authorized by the Bill and results in limiting the City opportunity to a similar .0073%. In order to claim the tax recovery from the Department of Revenue the City Council must: adopt a resolution of intent to authorize the maximum capacity of the tax within one year. The resolution requires a simple majority Council approval. The maximum value the City can receive from this recovery opportunity equals the 2019 taxable retail sales within the City multiplied by .0073%. The estimated recovery for the benefit of affordable housing efforts for the City in 2019 is estimated at $149,357, as illustrated below. Taxable Sales* % Incr HB 1406 rate Estimated City Benefit 2016 $1,857,077,913 https://dor.wa.gov/about/statistics-reports/local-retail-sales-2017 2017 1,908,761,386 102.8% https://dor.wa.gov/about/statistics-reports/l ocal-retail-sales-2017 2018 1,986,400,370 104.1% https://dor.wa.gov/about/statistics-reports/l ocal-retail-sales-2018 2019 est 2,045,992,000 103.0% 0.00730%149,357.42 * from DOR website 8 CERTIFICATION OF ENROLLMENT SUBSTITUTE HOUSE BILL 1406 Chapter 338, Laws of 2019 66th Legislature 2019 Regular Session AFFORDABLE AND SUPPORTIVE HOUSING--LOCAL SALES AND USE TAX EFFECTIVE DATE: July 28, 2019 Passed by the House April 28, 2019 Yeas 62 Nays 36 FRANK CHOPP Speaker of the House of Representatives Passed by the Senate April 28, 2019 Yeas 33 Nays 15 CYRUS HABIB President of the Senate CERTIFICATE I, Bernard Dean, Chief Clerk of the House of Representatives of the State of Washington, do hereby certify that the attached is SUBSTITUTE HOUSE BILL 1406 as passed by the House of Representatives and the Senate on the dates hereon set forth. BERNARD DEAN Chief Clerk Approved May 9, 2019 2:51 PM FILED May 13, 2019 JAY INSLEE Governor of the State of Washington Secretary of State State of Washington 9 AN ACT Relating to encouraging investments in affordable and1 supportive housing; and adding a new section to chapter 82.14 RCW.2 BE IT ENACTED BY THE LEGISLATURE OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON:3 NEW SECTION. Sec. 1. A new section is added to chapter 82.144 RCW to read as follows:5 (1) The definitions in this subsection apply throughout this6 section unless the context clearly requires otherwise.7 (a) "Nonparticipating city" is a city that does not impose a8 sales and use tax in accordance with the terms of this section.9 (b) "Nonparticipating county" is a county that does not impose a10 sales and use tax in accordance with the terms of this section.11 (c) "Participating city" is a city that imposes a sales and use12 tax in accordance with the terms of this section.13 (d) "Participating county" is a county that imposes a sales and14 use tax in accordance with the terms of this section.15 (e) "Qualifying local tax" means the following tax sources, if16 the tax source is instated no later than twelve months after the17 effective date of this section:18 (i) The affordable housing levy authorized under RCW 84.52.105;19 SUBSTITUTE HOUSE BILL 1406 AS AMENDED BY THE SENATE Passed Legislature - 2019 Regular Session State of Washington 66th Legislature 2019 Regular Session By House Housing, Community Development & Veterans (originally sponsored by Representatives Robinson, Macri, Chapman, Valdez, Senn, Peterson, Kloba, Tharinger, Gregerson, Stanford, Walen, Doglio, Frame, Jinkins, Riccelli, Slatter, Ormsby, and Santos) READ FIRST TIME 02/08/19. p. 1 SHB 1406.SL 10 (ii) The sales and use tax for housing and related services1 authorized under RCW 82.14.530, provided the city has imposed the tax2 at a minimum or at least half of the authorized rate;3 (iii) The sales tax for chemical dependency and mental health4 treatment services or therapeutic courts authorized under RCW5 82.14.460 imposed by a city; and6 (iv) The levy authorized under RCW 84.55.050, if used solely for7 affordable housing.8 (2)(a) A county or city legislative authority may authorize, fix,9 and impose a sales and use tax in accordance with the terms of this10 section.11 (b) The tax under this section is assessed on the selling price12 in the case of a sales tax, or value of the article used, in the case13 of a use tax.14 (c) The rate of the tax under this section for an individual15 participating city and an individual participating county may not16 exceed:17 (i) Beginning on the effective date of this section until twelve18 months after the effective date of this section:19 (A) 0.0073 percent for a:20 (I) Participating city, unless the participating city levies a21 qualifying local tax; and22 (II) Participating county, within the limits of nonparticipating23 cities within the county and within participating cities that do not24 currently levy a qualifying tax;25 (B) 0.0146 percent for a:26 (I) Participating city that currently levies a qualifying local27 tax;28 (II) Participating city if the county in which it is located29 declares they will not levy the sales and use tax authorized under30 this section or does not adopt a resolution in accordance with this31 section; and32 (III) Participating county within the unincorporated areas of the33 county and any city that declares they will not levy the sales and34 use tax authorized under this section or does not adopt a resolution35 in accordance with this section;36 (ii) Beginning twelve months after the effective date of this37 section:38 (A) 0.0073 percent for a:39 p. 2 SHB 1406.SL 11 (I) Participating city that is located within a participating1 county if the participating city is not levying a qualifying local2 tax; and3 (II) Participating county, within the limits of a participating4 city if the participating city is not levying a qualifying local tax;5 (B) 0.0146 percent within the limits of a:6 (I) Participating city that is levying a qualifying local tax;7 and8 (II) Participating county within the unincorporated area of the9 county and within the limits of any nonparticipating city that is10 located within the county.11 (d) A county may not levy the tax authorized under this section12 within the limits of a participating city that levies a qualifying13 local tax.14 (e)(i) In order for a county or city legislative authority to15 impose the tax under this section, the authority must adopt:16 (A) A resolution of intent to adopt legislation to authorize the17 maximum capacity of the tax in this section within six months of the18 date in which this section takes effect; and19 (B) Legislation to authorize the maximum capacity of the tax in20 this section within one year of the date on which this section takes21 effect.22 (ii) Adoption of the resolution of intent and legislation23 requires simple majority approval of the enacting legislative24 authority.25 (iii) If a county or city has not adopted a resolution of intent26 in accordance with the terms of this section, the county or city may27 not authorize, fix, and impose the tax.28 (3) The tax imposed under this section must be deducted from the29 amount of tax otherwise required to be collected or paid to the30 department of revenue under chapter 82.08 or 82.12 RCW. The31 department must perform the collection of such taxes on behalf of the32 county or city at no cost to the county or city.33 (4) By December 31, 2019, or within thirty days of a county or34 city authorizing the tax under this section, whichever is later, the35 department must calculate the maximum amount of tax distributions for36 each county and city authorizing the tax under this section as37 follows:38 (a) The maximum amount for a participating county equals the39 taxable retail sales within the county in state fiscal year 201940 p. 3 SHB 1406.SL 12 multiplied by the tax rate imposed under this section. If a county1 imposes a tax authorized under this section after a city located in2 that county has imposed the tax, the taxable retail sales within the3 city in state fiscal year 2019 must be subtracted from the taxable4 retail sales within the county for the calculation of the maximum5 amount; and6 (b) The maximum amount for a city equals the taxable retail sales7 within the city in state fiscal year 2019 multiplied by the tax rate8 imposed under subsection (1) of this section.9 (5) The tax must cease to be distributed to a county or city for10 the remainder of any fiscal year in which the amount of tax exceeds11 the maximum amount in subsection (4) of this section. The department12 must remit any annual tax revenues above the maximum to the state13 treasurer for deposit in the general fund. Distributions to a county14 or city meeting the maximum amount must resume at the beginning of15 the next fiscal year.16 (6)(a) If a county has a population greater than four hundred17 thousand or a city has a population greater than one hundred18 thousand, the moneys collected or bonds issued under this section may19 only be used for the following purposes:20 (i) Acquiring, rehabilitating, or constructing affordable21 housing, which may include new units of affordable housing within an22 existing structure or facilities providing supportive housing23 services under RCW 71.24.385; or24 (ii) Funding the operations and maintenance costs of new units of25 affordable or supportive housing.26 (b) If a county has a population of four hundred thousand or less27 or a city has a population of one hundred thousand or less, the28 moneys collected under this section may only be used for the purposes29 provided in (a) of this subsection or for providing rental assistance30 to tenants.31 (7) The housing and services provided pursuant to subsection (6)32 of this section may only be provided to persons whose income is at or33 below sixty percent of the median income of the county or city34 imposing the tax.35 (8) In determining the use of funds under subsection (6) of this36 section, a county or city must consider the income of the individuals37 and families to be served, the leveraging of the resources made38 available under this section, and the housing needs within the39 jurisdiction of the taxing authority.40 p. 4 SHB 1406.SL 13 (9) To carry out the purposes of this section including, but not1 limited to, financing loans or grants to nonprofit organizations or2 public housing authorities, the legislative authority of the county3 or city imposing the tax has the authority to issue general4 obligation or revenue bonds within the limitations now or hereafter5 prescribed by the laws of this state, and may use, and is authorized6 to pledge, the moneys collected under this section for repayment of7 such bonds.8 (10) A county or city may enter into an interlocal agreement with9 one or more counties, cities, or public housing authorities in10 accordance with chapter 39.34 RCW. The agreement may include, but is11 not limited to, pooling the tax receipts received under this section,12 pledging those taxes to bonds issued by one or more parties to the13 agreement, and allocating the proceeds of the taxes levied or the14 bonds issued in accordance with such interlocal agreement and this15 section.16 (11) Counties and cities imposing the tax under this section must17 report annually to the department of commerce on the collection and18 use of the revenue. The department of commerce must adopt rules19 prescribing content of such reports. By December 1, 2019, and20 annually thereafter, and in compliance with RCW 43.01.036, the21 department of commerce must submit a report annually to the22 appropriate legislative committees with regard to such uses.23 (12) The tax imposed by a county or city under this section24 expires twenty years after the date on which the tax is first25 imposed.26 Passed by the House April 28, 2019. Passed by the Senate April 28, 2019. Approved by the Governor May 9, 2019. Filed in Office of Secretary of State May 13, 2019. --- END --- p. 5 SHB 1406.SL 14 MEMORANDUM To: Cliff Moore, City Manager From: Colleda Monick, Community Development Specialist Joan Davenport, Community Development Director Date: June 5, 2019 Subject: Update on the Downtown Master Plan “Move to adopt as the downtown definition; to identify and update the essential concepts, land use, transportation and implementation framework elements for the core commercial area for the Central Business District along Yakima Ave and surrounding vicinity.” Councilmember White Page 6 of the Yakima Downtown Master Plan (YDMP) Introductory paragraph states; “The Yakima Downtown Master Plan Project Summary identifies the essential concepts, land use, transportation and implementation framework elements for the core commercial area of the Central Business District along Yakima Avenue and the surrounding vicinity.” Concepts of the YDMP are identified on page 8 -9 and include “City Center, Boulevard, District Center, and Parkway” all defined in the YDMP. The process of implementing the essential concepts can be found on page 10. Land use is discussed in the YDMP on pages 12-13 and transportation can be found on pages 14-15. The framework for achieving the above can be found on the remaining pages of the YDMP starting on page 18. The Downtown Master Plan and an Action Step Summary was accepted by council on 11/19/2013. The Action Plan was a summary of the Yakima Downtown Master Plan Report prepared in 2013 by Crandall Arambula for the City Council. Several of the Action Steps have been implemented and several were never initiated. Most recently, on 1/12/19, City Council reviewed the Downtown Master Plan in a Special Meeting, and they identified #9 as the new “Game Changer” and added it to their Strategic Priorities. In the same meeting, they also discussed changing the priority to an “Exploration of a Downtown Development Destination”. (Role of staff would be to come back to council and figure out what that is.) 1. Initiate Plaza as a Game-Changer – The design firm of Gustafson Guthrie Nichol (GGN) was hired to begin this process – 3/18/13, RESOLUTION NO. 2014-045. Most recently, the council voted to put the plaza up for public vote on 7/10/18, as well put out an RFP for bids related to the operation of the plaza 6/19/18. STATUS: Not part of the Downtown Plan at this time 2. Appoint Implementation Committee and Retail Task Force Members – A 28 member citizen Implementation Committee was appointed to guide the Action Steps for the Downtown Plan – 11/19/2013. This committee was responsible for hosting several public meetings, study sessions, and council sessions in order to allow for public input and answer questions related to the plaza project. They included meetings with private business owners, outreach to media and 15 other stakeholders. The last Yakima City Council Study Session on the Plaza was held on 2/5/2018 reviewing information related to ‘Bonding’. STATUS: Complete 3. Implement Retail Marketing Outreach effort – City representatives attended a Retail Marketing Conference in May of 2014 to begin this process. The city has sent council representatives and city staff to the Global Retail Real Estate Convention (RECON) conference every year since (the last in spring 2018), to meet with developers, support local developers, and provide outreach and information on doing business in the city of Yakima. STATUS: Complete, not attending ReCon this year due to lack of staff resources 4. Conduct a Short and Long Term Parking Strategy and Circulation Study – Carl Walker Associates was hired by the City Council to conduct this study in parallel with the Plaza Design process. Downtown Parking Action Plan was approved on 3/3/2015, and has been implemented. Today, there are 1,250 new parking spaces within two blocks of the plaza, compared to 750 before this project was considered. In addition, other lots, 2 blocks from the plaza area are revamped with lighting, and resurfacing to accommodate all day employee parking. STATUS: Complete 5. Conduct a Market Feasibility Study for Public Market and Small Business Incubator Project. Council approved an agreement for an Incubator Feasibility Study R-2014-087. Council voted to discontinue any efforts to develop the incubator project on 1/16/2018. STATUS: Not part of the Downtown Plan at this time 6. Prepare Downtown Subarea Plan for Comprehensive Plan Amendment and develop SEPA Strategy – incorporated into the 2040 Comp Plan. STATUS: Completed 7. Design Standards/Guidelines – The City Planning Department has not adopted Design Standards/Guidelines related to form-based and façade design, per the YDMP. The Downtown Association of Yakima developed a Design Committee at the inception of the organization in 2015 meant to help guide downtown design and assist property owners in implementing and promoting historic preservation when possible. Council discussed reviewing design standards and guidelines at the 1/12/19 Special Meeting, but there were differing understandings on what “Design Standards/Guidelines” refer to. STATUS: DAY Façade program implemented in 2015; not implemented at a City level. White requested standards from public works at the 1/12/19 meeting – referring to the physical condition of the roadway for Yakima Ave and side streets. 8. Zoning/Regulatory Amendments – never initiated, no traction, no longer a council priority STATUS: Not implemented 9. Yakima Avenue Boulevard Project – council agreed to call this the “Game Changer” and added it to the Strategic Plan on 1/12/2019, Special Meeting (video 1:54). Later in the meeting, they 16 changed this to “Downtown Development Destination” and agreed that they would define what that means at a later date. STATUS: Staff to work with council on identifying what a “Downtown Development Destination” means. 10. Street Standards for Downtown – council discussed this during the Special Meeting on 1/12/2019, no consensus was made on what this actually means. STATUS: Not implemented 11. Chestnut Avenue/Retail Frontage improvements – Private investment has lead frontage improvements along Chestnut Avenue including EZ Tiger, The Orion, and the new Tieton Hotel Apartments. STATUS: Complete 17 Yakima City Council Strategic Priorities Monthly Council update June 24, 2019 1. Fiscal Sustainability Immediately following the January 12th Saturday planning meeting, staff prepared a 3-year Budget Plan to achieve the policy fund balance target by 2023. The 3- Year Plan was communicated to council in a memo in the February 5th regular council meeting agenda, outlining how budgeting a savings of $675,000 per year in 2020, 2021, and 2022 would achieve that target (attached for reference). By monitoring revenues and managing expenditures to budget and course- correcting to stay on track the current year (2019) is being managed to absorb events such as the February snow event, the weak 1st Quarter Sales Tax receipts, the delayed energy-saving LED installation project, and overtime/vacancies in various departments. This activity is not unique to this year; budget adoption is the single most critical success factor in setting the long- term course of fiscal sustainability for the city and the second most critical factor is managing to that budget through unexpected difficulties. 2. Main/Arterial Street Development • Transportation Benefit District established in 2018 ($20 Car Tab Fee) N. 1st St Revitalization Project Phase 1 – construction started in March 2019 and will be completed by November 2019. River Road Improvement 34th Ave to 40th Ave – construction started in April 2019 and will be completed by September 2019 to coincide with the completion of the new YMCA Aquatic/Fitness Center. • City-wide LED Lighting Upgrade Project - 2017 Lighting upgraded to LED along main arterials (City owned metal poles) approximately 2,400 lights. 3. Community Policing For the remainder of June, 2019 there are safety patrol presentations scheduled at Summitview Elementary School and Whitney Elementary School. These events are when officers and community service employees interact with school children who participate as school crossing guards during the year. The students are recognized for their achievements in service to their school. Community Services are working with Yakima Footprinters to create public service announcements which will be aired on local radio stations. These radio announcements are designed to allow our department to market ourselves in the community. 18 On Saturday, June 15, 2019, department members to include Lieutenant Pollard will participate in C.A.S.T for Kids at Sarg Hubbard Pond. The event is designed to provide children with disabilities to enjoy fishing with community members. This is an excellent opportunity for our department members to interact with the community. The officers who attend volunteer for this opportunity. Saturday, June 22 and Sunday, June 23, 2019, Yakima Police Officers and Community Services personnel will attend the 17th Annual Hot Shots 3-on-3 Tournament. This will be a combination of enforcement and positive community interactions. The department will have an opportunity to interact with local community members as well as those who have chosen to visit Yakima to be a part of the tournament. In addition, there will be a recruiting booth at the event with the hopes of attracting applicants to the department. On June 20, 2019, we will host a Block Watch meeting at Cornerstone Apartments at 1210 S. 72nd Avenue. This exhibits our ongoing support of community members taking an active role in making their own communities safer. On June 21, 2019, Community Services and Yakima Police Officers will support the City of Moxee with their National Night Out event. The coordinator of the event, Jan Hutchinson, asked for our department to assist with this event. Jan Hutchinson has been a huge supporter of the Yakima Police Department until she moved from the city. This is an opportunity to interact with members outside of our city, share our knowledge and support a local agency. All police agencies in the valley must work together to make the entire county a safer place. The Yakima Police Department will host a blood drive on July I. This blood drive benefits our community by department and community members donating blood which will be used for lifesaving measures when emergencies arise. Yakima Police Officers and Community Service personnel will attend the Terrace Heights Baptist Church Hero Nights event on July 10, 2019. This event allows community members to meet local community heroes. The event advertises free family summer block parties. Again, this event falls just outside the city limits of Yakima, but it supports the Yakima County Sheriff’s Office and allows for our officers to interact positively with those who live just outside the city limits as well as city residents who attend the event. On July 12, 2019, Yakima Police will continue with their reading events held at the West Valley Library. This allows officers the opportunity to read children's books to kids at the library. After the reading of the books, the officers interact with the children as they work on arts and crafts projects. On July 27, 2019, Community Services and Yakima Police Officers plan to participate in the Health and Safety Fair sponsored by Congressman 19 Newhouse. This event allows department members to interact with community members. On August 6, 2019, staff will participate in the National Night Out against Crime events. The officers will visit several block parties and community events during this night. The officers are able to travel throughout the city and attend multiple events during their shifts. Community members are able to share their concerns and positive comments with officers during the social encounters. In working with our community policing model, this will allow "Beat Officers" to interact with the residents of their beats in a positive manner. In addition to the listed events, the department will continue to schedule and host Roll Call Barbeques, Coffee with a Cop and Meet Your District Officer events at least once a month. These events are often scheduled when requests are submitted to the department. As previously stated, the scheduling of events is fluid and periodically changes based on unforeseen circumstances. The department hopes to expand their use of social media in the coming months which will help keep community members informed of upcoming events as well as document events that already occurred. In addition, we hope to increase the use of social media to disseminate information on emergency situations and other ongoing situations within the City of Yakima. 4. Safe Route to Schools • 2040 Transportation System Plan (2017) City of Yakima 2040 Comprehensive Plan (2017) City of Yakima Bicycle Master Plan (2018) Transit Development Plan (2018) Highway and Street System (2018) Pedestrian System (2018) Bike System (2018) • Title 12, 15 and Subdivision Development Standards The requirement of developers providing sidewalks as part of all new and improved development is ongoing. • City’s LED Street Lighting Upgrade Project (2017) Project to resume in June and is scheduled to be completed by Fall 2019 • Transportation Benefit District Projects (2018) - Sidewalk Improvements: Naches Ave. Sidewalk Project (Walnut to Pacific) – started in 2018 and will continue through 2019 to remove problematic trees that are disrupting sidewalks, replant acceptable trees, repair sidewalks, and add ADA ramps. 4th Street Sidewalk Project (Walnut to Pacific) – will start in 2019 to remove problematic trees that are disrupting sidewalks, replant acceptable trees, repair sidewalks, and add ADA ramps. 20 Mead Ave Sidewalk Project (27th Ave to 28th Ave) – will start in 2019 to remove problematic trees that are disrupting sidewalks, replant acceptable trees, repair sidewalks, and add ADA ramps. • YMC Chapter 8.96 - Complete Streets Policy 2019 Projects: Installation of sidewalk on the south side of Swan Avenue from McGuiness Park to Campbell Lane (tie into sidewalk installed as part of Garfield Safe Routes To Schools (SRTS) project. Installation of sidewalk on Race Street between 8th Street and Naches Avenue (tie into sidewalk installed as part of Adams/Washington SRTS project). Installation of sidewalk on the south side of Prasch Avenue from 20th Avenue to 16th Avenue (tie into sidewalk installed as part of the McClure Elementary SRTS project). Installation of sidewalk on the south side of Viola from 10th Avenue to 4th Avenue (adjacent to Hoover Elementary). Installation of sidewalk on the west side of Powerhouse Road from Robertson Elementary to Englewood Avenue. • Yakima Transit Sidewalk Policy Issue (2017 and 2018) 2017/2018 - Sidewalk installed along the east side of 40th Ave. north of Chestnut. This project complimented the crosswalk at the intersection of 40th Ave and Chestnut installed in 2017. • Sidewalk Condition Assessment (2017) The condition data is continuously utilized by staff to identify and prioritize future sidewalk repair projects. The information is also used for grant applications. • Traffic-Calming Policy (2018) A new Traffic-Calming Policy was approved by City Council in 2018. Currently 20 traffic-calming requests are the process of being evaluated. • Safe Routes To Schools (Grant Program) Recently completed Safe Routes to Schools Projects: Adams/Washington School Sidewalks – 2018. Installed sidewalk, ADA-compliant sidewalk ramps and crosswalks at various locations around the schools; relocated the school flashers to cover a larger area. The total project cost $380,000; Safe Routes to Schools grant was $357,000. West Valley Middle School Vicinity Improvements – 2016. Installed sidewalk on the south side of Zier Road from 72nd Avenue to 75th Avenue, and installed a traffic signal at the intersection of 72nd Avenue and Mead 21 Avenue. The total project cost $604,393.20; Safe Routes to Schools grant was $544,000. Other completed projects that improved sidewalk/ramps in the vicinity of Elementary Schools: Lincoln Avenue Corridor Safety – 2016. Installed 5-foot wide sidewalk and ADA-compliant sidewalk ramps on the north side of Lincoln Avenue between 24th Avenue and 32nd Avenue. The total project cost $482,076.10. The Highway Safety Improvement Project (HSIP) grant was for $440,000. Citywide Safety Improvements – 2014. This project installed 50 ADA- compliant sidewalk ramps on 16th Avenue between Nob Hill Boulevard and Lincoln Avenue. The total project cost $451,461.50; HSIP grant was for $400,000. Current Safe Routes to Schools Projects: • Garfield Elementary - $200,000 ($180,000 SRTS Grant; $20,000 Gas Tax) o Installation of sidewalk and ramps along east side of Campbell Lane from Jerome to Willow o Installation of curb, gutter, sidewalk and ramps and stormwater treatment system on the west side of 6th Ave from Jerome to Willow o Improving roadway crossings and installing flashers o Making Jerome Ave (East) and Fairbanks (West) become “one-way” streets Progress: o All of the right-of-way required for this project was acquired in 2018 o Pacific Power has been notified about their need to relocate their poles on Campbell Lane and we have been assured that this will be completed prior to summer o Nelson Construction was awarded the bid; City Council approved at the January 15th City Council meeting Public meeting was held at Garfield Elementary on May 29th. The construction start date is June 17, 2019; completed in August 2019. • McClure Elementary - $300,000 ($270,000 SRTS Grant; $30,000 Gas Tax) o Replacing and constructing sidewalk and ramps. o Constructing sidewalk and ramps on Lila Avenue between Karr Avenue and 24th Avenue. o Improving roadway crossings and installing a rectangular rapid flashing beacon at the crossing of 24th Avenue and Viola Avenue. 22 All of the right-of-way required for this project will be acquired in 2019. The completion date is estimated to be August 2020. The City also applied for two other Safe Routes to School grants this past spring. If successful, notification should be received by June 2019. They are: 1. McKinley Elementary School – This proposed Safety Improvements project in the vicinity of McKinley Elementary consists of the installation of a High intensity Activated Cross Walk (HAWK) pedestrian crossing signal at the intersection of Tieton Drive and 13th Avenue; replacement of damaged sections of sidewalk on MacLaren Street, 12th Avenue and 13th Avenue; installation of ADA ramps and crosswalks at various intersections; and the installation of a bike rack at the school. 2. Apple Valley Elementary School – This proposed 88th Avenue Sidewalk project in the vicinity of Apple Valley Elementary would include: installing curb, gutter and sidewalk on the east side of 88th Avenue between Tieton Drive and Summitview Avenue; installing ADA ramps at various intersections; installing raised crosswalks across 88th Avenue north of Chestnut Avenue and north of Barge Street; and installing a bike rack at the school. Priority Projects (2020 Safe Route To Schools Application Process): • Robertson Elementary – Englewood Ave. both to the east and west of Powerhouse Rd. are heavily utilized by students. This is extremely dangerous as there is no curb or gutter to separate the roadway from the shoulder. The same occurs along Powerhouse Rd. south of Englewood Ave. • Hoover Elementary – No sidewalks at Hoover Elementary. Observations indicate that students are heading in all four directions; will need to determine where the students live in order to determine the highest use locations for sidewalk installation. • Nob Hill Elementary – The School District is concerned with the lack of sidewalk along 32nd Ave near Nob Hill Elementary and the speed of traffic. Staff has meet with YSD in September 2018 and again in June 2019 to define the scope of work of SRTS projects and to continue to prioritize projects. 5. Youth Development Community Centers: February 19, 2019 - Entered into an agreement with OIC for the operation and maintenance of the Henry Beauchamp Community Center March 19, 2019 - Entered into an agreement with YPAL for the operation and maintenance of the Washington Fruit Community Center 23 June 4, 2019 - Entered into an agreement with YPAL for $75,000 CDBG funding for youth programming and services at the W ashington Fruit Community Center June 4, 2019 - Entered into an agreement with OIC for $75,000 CDBG funding for youth programming and services at the Henry Beauchamp Community Center Beyond the Bell Program (2018/2019) Costume Party ● Winter Party ● Valentines Party ● Treasure Egg Hunt ● End of the Year Party! Conference Week 12-6 pm November 5th -9th March 25th—29th Community Literacy Yakima Valley Library Books Junior Volunteers Read Books to Participants Washington State University Health and Nutrition Made and prepared fresh healthy snacks Incorporated physical activity Program Enrichment Recreation Activities Teambuilding Games Social Skills Arts & Crafts Homework Assistance Junior Volunteer Program 7 Jr Volunteers Assists with arts & crafts Homework and reading assistance Mentoring & Leadership BELL BUCK$ Incentive program to earn Bell Buck$ and purchase items at our store 118 Beyond the Bell Participants 16 Middle School Youth Volunteers 134 Youth Participants Beyond the Bell Program – Kissel Park Summer Day Camp (2018) Kissel Park Summer Day Camp June 18th – August 17th 9:00 am to 4:00 pm 24 Youth 5 – 11 years Program Enrichment Recreation Activities Teambuilding Games Sports Social Skills Arts & Crafts Weekly trips to Franklin Pool Dental Delta Youth Oral Health Community Literacy Yakima Valley Library Books Staff and Community Volunteers Read Books to Participants Junior Volunteer Program 10 Jr Volunteers Assists with Arts & Crafts Mentoring and Leadership Gang Reduction & Intervention Task (GRIT) Force Passed a Charter and Bylaws for the GRIT Force which provides the permanent structure and strategic governing body. The make-up of the governing body includes representatives from law enforcement, health care, government and a former gang-involved individual. The Village—the community of stakeholders, interested parties and collaborators—has met every two months to hear presentations on relevant topics and network across sectors to work towards filling gaps and providing opportunities for Yakima’s youth. A public education campaign was completed which included one hour radio interviews on Radio KDNA over the course of three months on relevant topics including gang indicators, ACEs, and youth programming. Concurrent advertisements and short interviews were done on Townsquare Media platforms. Ten students participated in the Yakima Youth Leadership Program pilot project—in partnership with ESD 105 and the Yakima School District—at Franklin and Lewis & Clark Middle Schools. These ten students had the opportunity to work one-on-one with a coach who provided education on a variety of topics including communication skills, drug and alcohol awareness, gang awareness, and conflict resolution. The coach also conducted attendance challenges which increased attendance and decreased tardiness in the participants. As part of the pilot program, we are collecting data from the participants, their families and school staff to evaluate the effectiveness and impact of the short pilot program. An independent researcher, with help from a Stanford University intern, is consulting to evaluate and analyze the data collected. 25 The City was awarded a Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) grant to work with youth and provide mental health services, life and job skills training, health services, and recovery support. This grant is being administered in partnership with ESD 105 and Comprehensive Health Care at the ESD 105 Open Doors facility. The City participated in the drafting of, and submitted a letter in support of, OIC’s application for an OJJDP mentorship grant for youth, including middle school youth, who have been in the juvenile justice system and are low-risk offenders. The grant award has not yet been announced. The City submitted an OJJDP grant for Youth Gang Suppression Implementation programs. If awarded, this grant would pay a portion of the costs to continue and expand the Yakima Youth Leadership Program for three years, and expand it to all four Yakima School District middle schools. The grant award has not yet been announced. Both OJJDP grants are anticipated to be awarded in August of 2019. 6. Mill Site Development • Secure street right-of-way (ROW) within the former Boise Cascade Mill Redevelopment property in 2019. • Finalize approval by Department of Ecology for the Interim Action Work Plan (IAWP) which specifies MSW removal, remediation and clean-up activities of landfill material under the road corridor. • Get clean up estimate for IAWP. • Finalize street design plans design cross sections, engineering cost estimates and surveys. • Consider a “Value Engineering” assessment process on design plan for Bravo Co Boulevard if cost estimate exceeds budget. Consider phasing of project. • Prepare bid documents. • Work with Finance to be ready to bond Bravo Co Boulevard in early 2020. An estimated $17 Million in LIFT available. • Support and coordinate with Yakima County in NEPA review of East-West Corridor review. Target for Final NEPA document by January 2020. • After ROW is secured, apply for crossing permit from BNSF/Central Washington Railroad (crossing permit may take one year). • Work with Department of Ecology and legislative delegation to get Capital budget contribution to the landfill clean up. 26 7. Homelessness/Affordable Housing • Review “Resolution of Intent” process for City of Yakima to take advantage of funding from newly passed State legislation “1406” which may generate an estimated annual revenue of $143,000. • Review criteria for funding from newly passed “1923” which provides local funding for planning, community engagement and potentially other tasks related to affordable housing. • Work with community partners including non-profit builders (such as Yakima Housing Authority, Catholic Charities, Farmworker Housing, Habitat for Humanity), private organizations (such as the Central Washington Homebuilders, Landlord Association, Northwest Justice Project) and other community groups to build strong alliances and a community approach to solving our housing shortage. • Explore regulatory options that could encourage residential infill throughout all neighborhoods in the City of Yakima. The Yakima Planning Commission is currently developing recommendations. • Explore financial incentives that would assist in the development of below market rate housing to meet the growing needs of low to moderate income families and residents. • Assist the Housing Authority to obtain more rent vouchers for area families. • Review options to increase the inventory of land available for multi-family housing. • Explore flexibility in Building Code requirements that would encourage mixed use developments in existing structures. • Review Opportunity Zones for funding of affordable housing projects. • Evaluate CDBG and HOME funds to ensure the City of Yakima is maximizing funds for preservation of housing and new construction. • Evaluate the International Property Maintenance Code to determine if code enforcement can improve housing conditions in the community without displacing low income families who have no other housing options. • Explore Community Trusts or Community Land Banking to develop an alternative mechanism for funding affordable housing or land acquisition. • Participate in Homeless Network and Homeless Coalition to support agencies and community efforts to address homeless ness. 27 • Work with Yakima County in the development of a facility to address homeless housing and case management at the City owned property on East Nob Hill Blvd near the Wastewater plant. • Support Camp Hope in providing a location for low barrier emergency shelter and work toward a more permanent solution. 8. Airport Expansion The Yakima Air Terminal-McAllister Field provides vital transportation services within Yakima County. In 2012, Washington State Department of Transportation Aviation Division conducted an economic impact study which estimates that the airport contributes approximately $112 million annually within the region. Given the impacts within the community, the Economic Development Committee identified the airport as a priority in order to continue expansion efforts to meet transportation demands. Since October 2018, the airport has been successful in attracting and expanding both aviation and non-aviation businesses. In May, Cub Crafters announced the intent to sublease with the option to purchase a large hangar to expand their aircraft manufacturing facilities. This facility has opened the door for additional expansion on the south side of the airport along 21st Ave and Airport Lane. Additionally, this facility will allow Cub Crafters to hire additional staff for aircraft manufacturing, which will provide jobs within the valley. In April, McCormick Air Center in conjunction with airport staff, were successful in attracting the Washington State Department of Natural Resources aviation department to the Yakima Airport. Currently, DNR leases facilities to house two Bell UH-1H helicopters and associated air and ground crews to support the growing demands of wildfires within the Yakima Valley. Given the critical support McCormick Air Center provides the air crews, they are exploring the potential of adding a third aircraft to be housed at the Yakima Airport. As aviation activities continue to expand at the airport, the demand for aircraft storage has exceeded current inventory levels. In order to meet these demands, McCormick Air Center has been working with airport staff on identifying additional facilities which will occupy approximately 61,467 square feet to accommodate another 12 aircraft. This area has the potential of expanding by another 36,777 square feet in order to add another 7 aircraft when future demand warrants. Planned construction of this additional facility is to begin by August and be available in spring of 2020. In October 2018, due to FedEx’s growing demand for package delivery within the Yakima Valley, they have worked with airport staff and the Federal Aviation Administration to expand their vehicle parking to provide 30 additional parking stalls for delivery trucks. This parking expansion added approximately 29,083 square feet of property leased from the airport. In addition, the increased demand has warranted a larger cargo aircraft in order to transport the increased freight from the Yakima Valley. This not only secures additional jobs but also provides the community the opportunity to ship larger items from the airport. 28 Since October, airport staff has met with military personnel in order to secure another large military exercise at the Yakima Airport similar to the event in 2017. This exercise is scheduled to operate during September, where military units throughout the world will convene in Yakima to test their ability to respond to large future disasters including the projected Cascadia Subduction event. Approximately 150 troops will be stationed at the airport where many of them will depend on the community’s resources (i.e. Hotels, restaurants, rental cars, airport facilities etc.) to support their mission. As the airport continues to diversify businesses located on airport property, airport staff met with two businesses who have signed agreements to construct an espresso shop and restaurant. The first business is Castle Coffee, where a lease has been signed in order to construct an espresso shop at the northwest corner of 24th and Washington Avenues adjacent to the terminal building. This will provide the community the option to purchase coffees and pastry’s as well as offer a critical service to our passenger who arrive and depart the airport terminal building. Construction is slated to begin in July 2019 and be open for service beginning early 2020. The other business is Staci’s Catering, which has executed a lease agreement to operate out of the airport’s original terminal building located along 16th Avenue and Valley Mall Boulevard. This business will provide Cub Crafters, McAllister Museum, and pilots with a dining option on-airport. This location is a favorite among the community as it provides the opportunity for diners to witness aircraft landing and taking off. The facilities are currently being remodeled with an anticipated opening date in July 2019. These expansion efforts have not only met the aviation industry’s demands it also has provided the community with essential services. Additionally, these activities will provide a positive impact on the valley’s local economy by producing jobs as well as increase spending within the Valley. 9. City Facilities (pools and community centers) • Staff conducted a Community Facilities Tour on January 29, 2019. (Franklin Pool, Lions Pool, WFCC and HBCC). • Have met several times with the Ad Hoc Committee; getting direction as to what is required within the Statement For Qualifications (RFQ) in developing a Master Plan for each facility. • March 13, 2019 Parks Commission Meeting – presentation on Martin Luther King Jr. Park Community Swimming Pool Feasibility Study by Councilman-Hunsaker. Discussed what elements were important in designing the pool. • Ad Hoc Committee meeting held on March 13, 2019 to discuss with Councilman- Hunsaker what elements were important in designing the MLK Jr. outdoor pool. • Developed RFQs for Franklin Pool, Lions Pool, WFCC and HBCC. 29 • Held Aquatic Master Plan interviews on May 14, 2019; selecting the local firm KDF Architecture to develop Master Plans for both Franklin Pool and Lions Pool. • RFQ’s for the two community centers were sent out on May 28, 2019. • Public Meeting held on June 12, 2019 at both the HBCC and City Hall (Parks Commission meeting) to discuss and obtain input on the design schematics of the proposed MLK Jr. outdoor pool. Presented by Councilman-Hunsaker. • Ad Hoc Committee meeting held on June 13, 2019 to discuss and obtain input on the design schematics of the proposed MLK Jr. outdoor pool. Presented by Councilman-Hunsaker. 10. Downtown Destination “Move to adopt as the downtown definition; to identify and update the essential concepts, land use, transportation and implementation framework elements for the core commercial area for the Central Business District along Yakima Ave and surrounding vicinity.” Councilmember White The Downtown Master Plan divides the study area into distinctive ‘centers’ that support and strengthen existing assets – historic buildings, development patterns, and existing attractors. Tactics: 1. City Center • Private investment is focused around a multi-purpose public plaza that will provide a location for year-round civic gatherings • Focus of retail opportunities are concentrated along Chestnut, Front and Second serving as the center of street-oriented retail activity not only for the study area but all of the City of Yakima • Existing uses such as the Yakima Mall, government services and theatres are integrated and strengthened or re-purposed 2. Boulevard • Yakima Avenue is enhanced to prioritize the pedestrian from Front to Naches; special consideration and emphasis is given to intersection crosswalks to ensure that areas north and south of Yakima are seamlessly integrated • Additional greenery is added to ‘humanize’ the street; a median and curbside landscaping are featured 3. District Center • Hubs of retail activity are established outside the City Center at key intersections where pedestrian – and street-oriented development patterns exist • Centers are envisioned to include specialty uses, ‘incubator’ or similar uses that support but do not compete with the City Center 4. Parkway 30 • Parkways have a greater emphasis on ‘mobility’- movement through the district rather than an emphasis on creating a destination • Along these street segments, the median is omitted to accommodate a continuous left turn lane for essential mid-block access to existing auto- oriented uses; Curbside landscaping is enhanced o “Downtown Evaluation” memorandum dated February 28, 2019 submitted for the Economic Development Committee meeting. Identifying both short and long- term goals and objectives primarily looking at the streets, sidewalks and landscaping of the Downtown core area, in order to determine a plan of action to bring it back to City standards. Short term: • Traffic Signals – upgrade aging signals • Evaluate Irrigation system, valve by valve to detect leaks- many undetected leaks under sidewalks • Identify and repair broken sections of sidewalk • City Arborist to evaluate problem trees/sidewalks • Evaluate Street conditions (PCI Study) – 2020 Budget • Evaluate aging sanitary sewer system • Evaluate stormwater system • Upgrade Public Parking lot on 3rd Ave across from YPD- update lighting, signage, asphalt and fence. • Evaluate pedestrian lighting • Audit of signage- update/eliminate signage clutter in downtown area • Special color coded signs signifying Downtown area (visitors) • Evaluate for ADA compliance • Evaluate medians with landscaping- plan/install low water use gardens • Evaluate efficiency of watering system for hanging baskets • Code Enforcement – litter, weeds Long term: • Traffic Signals – System Program to Sync up • Redesign/Update Irrigation system • Complete Grind/ Overlay of Yakima Ave • Installation of additional pedestrian lighting • Eliminate stamped concrete- possibly replace with pavers for easier maintenance • Replace water lines, services, & fire hydrants- mains are fairly old and/or undersized • Upgrade sanitary sewer • Upgrade/Upsize stormwater system • Install Mid-block pedestrian crossings with islands • Eliminate electrical boxes on trees/replace with sidewalk lighting • Implement low water use gardens throughout Downtown area 31 • Plant proper type of trees along sidewalks o Conducted a meeting with the Downtown Association of Yakima (DAY) on March 8th to get their perspective and input. • Tree lighting Removal of any existing lights, repair/diagnose electrical issue with outlets, reinstall lights. Estimated completion October 2019. • Rock/landscape projects Introduce/remove plants, repair/establish irrigation, weed barrier, overlay w/1.5” chip rock 1. Millennium Plaza parking lot – within 2nd St, Chestnut, 3rd St borders 2. Planter on So 2nd St – approx. mid-block between Chestnut and Yakima Ave., West side of 2nd St. 3. Parking lot planters – SE corner 1st St and SSPW 4. Various small planter areas – SW and NE corners 2nd St/SSPW. NE corner Yakima Ave/Naches. SE corner 3rd St/MLK, SE corner 4th St /MLK. 5. POSSIBLE - Planters cornering Yakima County courthouse Estimated completion November 2019. o Infrastructure Evaluation Utilities (Water/Irrigation/Wastewater/Stormwater) evaluating each of the aging infrastructures to determine replacement and upsizing requirements to meet future needs. Also determining cost estimates. o In the process of hiring a City Engineer 32