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3-28-19 PSC agenda packetCouncil Public Safety Committee 2nd Floor Conference Room City Hall March 28, 2019 3:00 p.m. Members: Staff: Councilmember D. Gutierrez (chair) City Manager Cliff Moore Councilmember Cousens Interim Police Chief Gary Jones Councilmember Funk Fire Chief Aaron Markham Councilmember White (alternate) City Prosecutor Cynthia Martinez Public Safety Communications Manager Brad Coughenour Public Works Director Scott Schafer Agenda 1) Approval of February 28, 2019 minutes 2) Department Reports a) Fire Department i) Fire monthly report — Markham ii) Fire Code Inspection Division PowerPoint - Doan b) Police Department i) Community policing— Jones c) Legal Department i) Recap on Deflection and Diversion— Martinez d) Public Works i) Update on signal by Kiwanis Park — Schafer ii) Garfield project timeline/community notification plan e) Codes f) Yakima County Emergency Management i) Update on area flooding issues - Miller Others: 3) New Business 4) Other Business a) Public Safety discussions with Yakima School District — Gutierrez i) Safe Routes to Schools ii) Gang prevention iii) Youth Development 5) Information items 6) Recap of future agenda items 7) Review items for committee reports to council 8) Audience Participation 9) Adjournment Council Public Safety Committee 2nd Floor Conference Room City Hall February 28, 2019 3:00 p.m. Members: Staff: Others: Councilmember Gutierrez Cliff Moore, City Manager Tony Miller, Director Councilmember Cousens Gary Jones, Interim Police Chief YVEM Councilmember White (alt) Aaron Markham, Fire Chief Scott Schafer, PW Director Cynthia Martinez, City Prosecutor Colleda Monick, Community Development Susan Madrigal, Fire Executive Minutes Gutierrez called the meeting to order at 3:09 p.m. 1. January 31, 2019 minutes The minutes were approved by consensus. 2. Department reports a. Fire Department i. Fire Department monthly report Markham reviewed the monthly report ii. Fire Department annual report Markham presented the YFD 2018 annual report. After some questions from the committee were clarified, it was MOVED by Gutierrez to forward the report to the full council. Motion PASSED by consensus. b. Police Department i. Community Policing Report Jones discussed the beat officer program. Police will be presenting on the program at the next council meeting by request. c. Legal i. DV Response Martinez reported that the DV advocate is expected to open in March. Gutierrez asked Moore for updates on the Domestic Violence Bills. Moore gave the ok to the lobbyist on a number of bills, nothing is finalized as of now. Gutierrez read about McCabe's approval, it would be nice/helpful to have those updates and asked if updates be given on the March 5th Council Meeting. Moore advised the cutoff date for that meeting has already passed, but some of them should close this Friday and Randy Beehler should be able to provide those updates. d. Public Works i. Safe Routes to Schools Shafer discussed Safe Routes to School and passed out a packet. Committee members had the opportunity to review the packet for discussion. Gutierrez asked if there had been conversation with the schools since December and Shafer said phone conversations have taken place. Shafer explained that there are two programs being discussed: Complete Streets and Safe Routes to School. Safe Routes to School is a State Program (one mile around each elementary school) and is a competitive grant. Complete Streets is a grant that can accentuate other projects. Shafer reviewed the memo, construction will start this summer. ii. Traffic calming update Traffic calming requests are in the process of being added to the City's website. e. Code Administration i. Abandoned building issues Gutierrez asked if there was information that could be given to neighbors of abandoned/boarded up properties so that they can take action when there is activity on the property. YPD talked about the amount of time the home has been vacant coming into play, YFD echoed that and the need for an ordinance in order to enforce. Legal talked about a provision in the law for a city to condemn the property, but there could be a budgetary problem because they have to pay fair market value for it. Moore talked about the beat officer program helping to spread the word and said that he would talk with Watkins when she gets back regarding the vacant property ordinance; it may be a different scenario if property taxes have not been paid. Gutierrez requested this subject on next month's meeting under Codes. White discussed prioritizing code enforcement in school zones. Moore discussed the possibility of it being a summer intern project. f. Emergency Management Miller reported on YCOEM weather related alerts, a flood meeting last week and a tour that happened yesterday. Moore mentioned that city staff has cleared out a lot of area, but that Wide Hollow may be more problematic. 3. New Business a. Proposed Cruise Night legislation change Monick asked if there is any desire to update/amend the cruising ordinance. After discussion, Gutierrez recommended that it be put on next month's agenda. She would like a history of cruising night to be brought to the next meeting. 4. Other business a. Public Safety discussions with Yakima School District Gutierrez discussed that the YSD joint meeting with only cover two items per meeting and she would like to ask the committee to focus on Public Safety. White wants to make sure that whatever is brought is something everyone can work on. The first meeting will cover homelessness among students and the second meeting had several topics. Gutierrez is interested in pushing for Safe Routes to all elementary schools. White talked about the Gang Intervention MOU being one of the priorities. Gutierrez can present two things to full council (Gang Intervention and Safe Routes) to go to YSD. It was MOVED by Cousens to present the two items to full council. Motion PASSED by consensus. b. Martinez discussed the Deflection and Diversion Presentation on March 7th She is hoping someone from PSC can attend. 5. Recap of future agenda items • Board up houses • Cruise Night • Deflection and Diversion Program • Fire Code Inspection Program (Power Point Presentation) 6. Audience participation None 7. Items for council committee report • Fire Department Annual Report 8. Adjournment Meeting was adjourned at 3:52 p.m. Dulce Gutierrez, Chair Administration Fire Suppression Fire Investigation Fire Training Fire Prevention Public Education 401 North Front Street, Yakima, WA 98901 (509) 575-6060 Fax (509) 576-6356 www.yakimafire.com MEMORANDUM To: Yakima City Council Thru: Public Safety Committee From: Aaron Markham, Fire Chief Re: Fire Department Update Date: March 14, 2019 The following report serves to list the activities and accomplishments of the City of Yakima Fire Department for the month of January. Incidents: • Attached are the incident reports for the months of February 2018 and February 2019. Fire Inspections: • Annual Fire Inspections- 222 • Compliance Re -Inspection- 152 • Fire Inspection Reports- 29 • Event Inspections- 1 • Post Fire/Incident Inspections- 4 • Total number of inspections- 408 Fire System Records Management Program Presentation: • Attached is a Power Point presentation that will be presented by Inspector Doan. "The Yakima Fire Department is dedicated to providing quality public safety services to our community." Yakima City Fire Department Yakima, WA This report was generated on 3/14/2019 11:50:04 AM (509)575-6060 Breakdown by Major Incident Types for Date Range Zone(s): All Zones I Start Date: 02/01/2018 I End Date: 02/28/2018 Rescue & Emergency Medical... False Alarm & False Call 5.87% 6598% Fires 5.87% Service Call 9.56% Good Intent Call 11.07% Hazardous Condition (No Fire) 1.64% 9/ Fires 43 5.87% Rescue & Emergency Medical Service 483 65.98% Hazardous Condition (No Fire) 12 1.64% Service Call 70 9.56% Good Intent Call 81 11.07% False Alarm & False Call 43 5.87% T(C)TAL 732 I 00.00'fo Only REVIEWED incidents included. Summary results for a major incident type are not displayed if the count is zero. EMERGENCY RE PORTING emergencyreporting.com Doc Id 553 Page # 1 of 3 Detailed Breakdown byIncident Type INCIDENT TYPE 100 Fire, other 111 Building fire 112 Fires in structure other than in a building 113 Cooking fire, confined to container 116 FueI burner/boiler malfunctiori, fire confined 118 Trash or rubbish fire, contained 122 Fire in motor home, camper, recreational vehicle 131 Passenger vehicle fire 140 Natural vegetation fire, other 142 Brush or brush -and -grass mixture fire 143 Grass fire 151 Outside rubbish, trash or waste fire 154 Dumpster or other outside trash receptacle fire 300 Roonuo, EMS iricident, other 311 Medical assist, assist EMS crew 320 Emergency medical service, other 321 EMS caII, excluding vehicle accident with irijury 322 Motor vehicle accident with injuries 323 Motor vehicle/pedestrian accident (MV Ped) 324 - Motor vehicle accident with no injuries. 353 Removal of victim(s) from stalled elevator 400 Hazardous condition, other 412 Gas leak (natural gas or LPG) 440 Electrical wiring/equipmentprob|om. other 444 Power line down 445 Arcing, shorted electrical equipment 481 Attempt to burn 500 Service CalI, other 510 - Person in distress, other 511 Lock -out 520 Water problem, other 522 - Water or steam leak 531 Smoke or odor removal 550 - Public service assistance, other 551 - Assist police or other governmental agency 552 - Police matter 553 - Public service 554 - Assist invalid 561 - Unauthorized burning OOU-GoodinientcoU.other 611 - Di & cancelled en route 621 - Wrong location 622 - No incident found on arrival at dispatch address 631 - Authorized controlled burning 650 - Steam, other gas mistaken for smoke, other 651 - Smoke scare, odor of smoke 653 - Smoke from barbecue, tar kettle 7OO-False alarm orfalse call, other 710 - Malicious, mischievous faise calI, other 711 - Municipal alarm system, malicious faise atarm 713 - Telephone, malicious faise alarm 714 - Central station, malicious faise alarm 730 - System malfunction, other 733 - Smoke detector activation due to malfunction 735 - Alarm system sounded due to malfunction # % of TOTAL 2 0.27% 12 1.64% 1 0.14% 6 0.82% 0.55% 0.14% 0.55% 0.14% 0.68% 0.41% 0.14% 0.27% 1.37% 9.84% 2.87% 4413% 2.46% 0.27% 4.92% 0.14% 014% 0.27% 0.27% 0.27% 0.55% 0.14% 2.05% 0.68% 0.27% 0.27% 0.27% 0.27% 0.14% 0.14% 0.27% 0.14% 4.64% 0.41% 0.14% 8.47% 0.14% 1.64% 0.14% 014% 0.27% 0.14% 2.60% 0.14% 0.14% 014% 0.14% 0.27% 0.27% 0.55% 4 1 4 1 5 3 1 2 10 72 21 323 18 2 36 1 1 2 2 2 4 1 15 5 2 2 2 2 1 1 2 1 34 3 1 62 1 12 1 1 2 1 19 1 1 1 1 2 2 4 OnIy REVIEWED incidents included. Summary results for a major incident type are not displayed if the count is zero. �� Vm��EMERGENCY �REPzmnING` Doc Id 553 Page # 2 of 3 740 - Unintentional transmission of alarm, other 5 0.68%741 - Sprinkler activation, no fire - unintentional 1 0.14%743 - Smoke detector activation, no fire - unintentional 4 0 55°/744 - Detector activation, no fire - unintentional 1 0.14%745 - Alarm system activation, no fire - unintentional 1 0.14% Only REVIEWED incidents included. Summary results for a major incident type are not displayed if the count is zero. ��EMERGENCY -=_-'_'_---'_ omomonorop mno.omn Doc Id 553 Page # 3 of 3 Yakima City Fire Department Yakima, WA This report was generated on 3/14/2019 11:50:30 AM (509)575-6060 Breakdown by Major Incident Types for Date Range Zone(s): All Zones 1 Start Date: 02/01/2019 1 End Date: 02/28/2019 Rescue & Emergency Medical Service 65.46% Fires 2.58% Hazardous Condition (No Fire) 1.80% 9))999999k False Alarm & False Call 5.03% Service Call 10.57% Good Intent Call 14.30% Overpressure rupture, explosion,... 0.26% kk k Fires 20 2.58% Overpressure rupture, explosion, overheat - no fire 2 0.26% Rescue & Emergency Medical Service 508 65.46% Hazardous Condition (No Fire) 14 1.80% Service Call 82 10.57% Good Intent Call 111 14.30% False Alarm & False Call 39 5.03% TOl'AL 71ti 100.00(!lo Only REVIEWED incidents included. Summary results for a major incident type are not displayed if the count is zero. EMERGENCY REPORTING emergencyreporting.com Doc Id 553 Page # 1 of 3 Detailed Breakdown byIncident Type INCIDENT TYPE 100 Fire, other 111 Building fire 113 Cooking fire, confined to container 116 FueI burner/boiler malfunction, fire confined 118 Trash or rubbish fire, contained 130 Mobile property (vehicle) fire, other 131 Passenger vehicle fire 151 Outside rubbish, trash or waste fire 154 Dumpster or other outside trash receptacle fire 160 Special outside fire, other 221 Overpressure rupture of air or gas pipe/pipeline 251 Excessive heat, scorch burns with no ignition 300 Reoouo, EMS iricident, other 311 - Medical assist, assist EMS crew 320 Emergency medical service, other 321 EMS omU, excluding vehicle accident with injury 322 Motor vehicle accident with injuries 323 Motor vehicle/pedestrian accident (MV Ped) 324M�orvehicle accident vvithnoi�uheo. 400 Hazardous condition, other 412 - Gas leak (natural gas or LPG) 420 - Toxic condition, other 440 - Electrical wiring/equipment problem, other 442 - Overheated motor 444 - Power line down 445 - Arcing, shorted electrical equipment 5OO-Service Call, other 510 - Person in distress, other 520 - Water problem, other 522 - Water or steam leak 531 - Smoke or odor removal 550 - Public service assistance, other 551 - Assist police or other governmental agency 552 - Police matter 553 - Public service 554 - Assist invalid 8nO-Good intent call, other 611 - Dispatched & cancelled en route 622 - No incident found on arrival at dispatch address 651 - Smoke scare, odor of smoke 661 - EMS calt, party transported by non -fire agency O71-HuzN)atrelease investigation w/noHazK4at 7OO-False alarm orfalse call, other 710 - Malicious, mischievous faise caII, other 711 - Municipal alarm system, malicious faise alarm 712- Direct tie to FD, malicious faise alarm 730 - System matfunction, other 731 - Sprinkler activation due to maffunction 733 - Smoke detector activation due to malfunction 735 Alarm system sounded due to malfunction 736 CO detector activation due to malfunction 740 Unintentional transmission of alarm, other 741 - Sprinkler activaion. no fire - unintentional 743 Smoke detector activation, no fire unintentional 745 - Alarm system activation, no fire unintentional # % of TOTAL 3 0.39% 4 0.52% 2 0.26% 1 0.13% 1 0.13% 1 0.13% 5 0.64% 1 U13% 1 0.13% 1 0.13% 1 (l13% 1 0.13% 12 1.55% 70 9.02% 12 1.55% 369 47.55% 19 2.45% 2 0.26% 24 3.09% 2 0.26% 2 0.26% 1 0.13% 3 0.39% 1 0.13% 4 0.52% 1 (l13% 11 1.42% 8 1.03% 3 0.39% 7 0.90% 2 0.26% 2 0.26% 5 0.64% 1 0.13% 3 0.39% 40 5.15% 5 0.64% 84 10.82% 17 2.19% 1 0.13% 1 (l.13% 3 0.39% 13 1.68% 1 (l13% 2 0.26% 1 0.13% 1 0.13% 1 0.13% 3 0.39% 1 0.13% 3 0.39% 2 0.26% 2 0.26% 7 0.90% 1 0.13% OnIy REVIEWED incidents included. Summary results for a major incident type are not displayed if the count is zero. EMERGENCYREPORTING om*rg000vmvvmno.00m Doc Id 553 Page # 2 of 3 1�� 746 - Carbon monoxide detector activation, no Ob , 0.13% OnIy REVIEWED incidents included. Summary results for a major incident type are not displayed if the count is zero. ��EMERGENCY -=_-'_'_---'_ omomonorop mno.omn Doc Id 553 Page # 3 of 3 !Or racial Impa Cost Recovery • Possible Revenue Generated • Surrounding Jurisdictions • Question & Answer Fire protection systems require annual (or sometimes 6 -month) maintenance inspections to verify operability and compliance with applicable NFPA Standards. This service is provided by a third party, private contractor, who is trained and certified in the system they are inspecting (e.g.: fire alarm, fire sprinkler, or kitchen suppression). Tracking fire protection systems is a key component to a successful fire prevention program. The 2015 International Fire Code (adopted by the City of Yakima) requires those records to be submitted to the Authority Having Jurisdiction; this allows the Fire Code Inspection Division to track " and require repairs of any deficiencies that may hinder the operation of these systems. See Appendix A. Benefits Fire Protection Deficiencies Re aired Since 2014, this pmgram has been responsible for the abatement of more than 1,000 individual hazards that directly affect the operation of fire protection systems. This has had an immediate and positive impact on the safety of lives and property in our community. It also helps emergency responders arrive to a safer scene, allowing for more efficient operations. Additionally, this is part of Washington State Survey and Rating Bureau SR equation when determining the City's insurance classification. During their last audit, which concluded in March of 2018 a were awarded ed 1 % credit in tegory. Automatic Fire :Sprinklers Fire Alarms Kitchen Suppression Kitchen Hood & Duct Cleaning Fire Door Paint Booth Private Hydrants F M 200/CO2/Dry Chem Fire Escape Fire Pump Standpipe Impact: reviewed, per year mutes to process one Equivalent to 1,Q50 hours of work per year Approximately 15 report Or 20 staff hours spent ost Recovery • 2017 fee schedule adopted Fee schedule includes cost recovery Annual fire code inspections Compliance inspections Event inspections ee schedule does not include cost recovery for the Fire System Records Management Program Propose a per report fee for all inspection submitted and reviewed Total Reports Reviewed Annually 4,000 Proposed Fee Per Report $15 00 Possible Annual Revenue Generated $60,000 • Who pays the fee? • What businesses do these impact? • What are other jurisdictions doing?. Richland: ',edgy 11 lay Des Moines Pullman: 9. Kennewick 1,.p m°urlington • 11. tlllt ;atoom County 12. Mukiiteo 13. Everett Sdrr Woolley Pasco git County Lake Stevens dmonds iountlake Terrace Moses Lake E. Wenatchee 26. La Conner 27. Blaine 28. Othello o' 29. Grant Coun 31. Monroe 32. Douglas County 3. $urien 34. Normandy Park 35.Bellevue 30. Camas 37. Washougal 8. Battle Ground 39. Bothell 40. Clark County 41. Carnation 42. Issaquah 43. ,North Bend 44. Sa;+mamarrish- 45. Me rcer Island 48. Covington 47. Kent 48. Sea -Tac 49. Redmond 50. Seattle rn 23. Leavenworth! 1124. Wenatchee. 25. W. Richland 54. Shoreline 52. Tacoma 53. Algona 54. Auburn 55. Pacific 5 Lakewood UniversLty Place Spokane (See Appendix B) u i tli; 1, k Pf„{iT Surrey O yrnp a °Abbotsford 9 Portland Fiji%sb°roo Mt 7':tm esx ElierbUrfg Yakima Kennewick Administration Fire Suppression Fire Investigation Fire Training Fire Prevention Public Education To Whom it May Concern, 401 North Front Street, Yakima, WA 98901 (509) 575-6060 Fax (509) 576-6356 www.yakimafire.com APPENDIX As many of you are already aware, the City of Yakima Fire Code Inspection Division requires all copies of inspection reports to be sent to us for documentation and review. This applies to all systems in the City of Yakima. Being that some time has passed since the last notice, we thought we would send out another notice with the most recent language in the state adopted 2015 International Fire Code. The following is a set of currently adopted codes that require all copies of reports be sent to the Fire Code Official, as well as a list of what systems are required to be submitted: [A] 107.2 Testing and operation. Equipment requiring periodic testing or operation to ensure maintenance shall be tested or operated as specified in this code. [A] 107.2.1 Reinspection and testing. Where any work or installation does not pass an initial test or inspection, the necessary corrections shall be made so as to achieve compliance with this code. The work or installation shall then be resubmitted to the fire' code official for inspection and testing. [A] 107.3 Recordkeeping. A record of periodic inspections, tests, servicing and other operations and maintenance shall be maintained on the premises or other approved location for not less than 3 years, or a different period of time where specified in this code or referenced standards. Records shall be made available for inspection by the fire code official, and a copy f the records shall be provided to the fire code official upon request. The code official is authorized to prescribe the form and fornnat of such recorokeepinT The fire code official is authorized to require that certain required records be filed with the fire code official.' 901.6 Inspection, testing and maintenance. Fire detection, alarm, and extinguishing systems, mechanical smoke exhaust systems, and smoke and heat vents shall be maintained in an operative condition at all times, and shall be replaced or repaired where defective. Nonrequired fire protection systems and equipment shall be inspected, tested and maintained or removed. 703.4 Testing. Horizontal and vertical sliding and rolling fire doors shall be inspected and tested annually to confirm proper operation and full closure. Records of inspections and testing shall be maintained. "The Yakima Fire Department is dedicated to providing quality public safety services to our community." Administration Fire Suppression Fire Investigation Fire Training Fire Prevention Public Education 401 North Front Street, Yakima, WA 98901 (509) 575-6060 Fax (509) 576-6356 www.yakimafire.com 901.6.1 Standards. Fire protection systems shall be inspected, tested and maintained in accordance with the referenced standards listed in Table 901.6.1. TABLE 901.6.1 FIRE PROTECTION SYSTEM MAINTENANCE SYSTEM Portable tire extinguishers Carbon dioxide tire -extinguishing system Halon 1301 fire -extinguishing systems Dry -chemical extinguishing systems \Vet -chemical extniguishing systems Water-based tire protection systems Fire alarm systems , , Smoke and neat vents Water -mist systenis Clean -agent extinguishing systems STANDARDS STANDARD NFPA 10 NFPA 12 NF PA 12A NI:PA 17 NFPA 17A NFPA 25 NFPA 72 NFPA20:1 NFPA 750 NFPA 2001 Please disregard 'Portable Fire Extinguishers' in the above table, as reports are not required. Also, see 703.4 (above) for fire door testing requirements. As noted in Section 107.2.1, if you have hazards marked on a report, and you have repaired said hazard, please resubmit a report stating that all previously noted hazards have been corrected. This would be greatly appreciated as it improves efficiency. Reports can be submitted to firereports@yakimawa.gov . Also, feel free to contact us at that email, or call us at 509-575-6060 with any questions or concerns. If copies are not submitted to the Fire Code Inspection Division, the tag or sticker on site will not suffice as a valid inspection as it does not give details to the results of the test. To all of the companies already complying with these requirements, we thank you. You have been a very integral part of our inspection program, thus improving the life and property safety throughout the valley. "The Yakima Fire Department is dedicated to providing quality public safety services to our community." APPENDIX B City Of Spokane Municipal Code Title 17F Construction Standards Chapter 17F.080 Fire Code Section 17F.080.260 Fire Protection System Verification A. A person responsible fora fire protection system requiring inspection by a state -licensed and Spokane fire department registered fire equipment servicer must submit to the fire department the servicer's report and the verification fee as established in ` 8.02.034(F). Upon receipt of the report and the fee, the fire department: 1 verifies that the service was performed by a state -licensed servicing company registered with the fire department as a fire equipment servicer; reviews the 'servicer 's report to determine if the service was successful with no deficiencies; 3. in the event there are deficiencies, provides an inspection, either on-site or by phone, and verifies the necessary correction; and 4. maintains service records in a databank.' B. Any person responsible for a fire protection system requiring inspection by a registered fire equipment servicer who fails or refuses to comply with any of the requirements of this section is subject to a civil infraction pursuant to chapter 1.05 SMC. C. Verification fees generated under SMC 8.02.034(F) are allocated by the fire department toward the expense of enforcing fire protection system regulations. D. For purposes of this chapter, a fire protection system includes, but is not limited to, fire detection or fire suppression equipment approved by the fire department. Date Passed: Monday, June 7, 2010 Effective Date: Thursday, July 1, 2010 ORD C34601 Section 18 Title 08 Taxation and Revenue Chapter 08.02 Fees and Charges Article III. Building and Construction Permits Section 08.02.034 Fire Code A. Storage Tanks. The fees in connection with aboveground or underground storage tanks for critical materials as defined in SMC 17A.020.030, including flammable or combustible liquids, are: 1. Installation (including installation of pumps and dispensers) of underground storage tank, per tank: Three hundred sixty-four dollars 2. Installation of above ground storage tank, per tank: a. More than sixty but less than five hundred gallons: One hundred fifty-eight dollars. b. Five hundred gallons or more: Two hundred twenty-five dollars. 3. Aboveground or underground storage tank removal or abandonment, per tank: Eighty-eight dollars. 4. Placement of tank temporarily out of service: Eighty-eight dollars. 5. Alteration or repair of a tank: One hundred fifty-six dollars. B. Installation of Fire Protection/Detection Equipment. 1. The fees for installing, altering, or repairing fire protection and/or fire detection equipment are based on the value of the work, according to the following schedule: BID AMOUNT PE ' IT FEE (Valuation) PLAN CHECK FEE $1 through $500 $0 $0 $501 through $700 $60 $0 $701 through $1,400 $60 $39 $1,401 through $2,100 $110 $71.50 $2,101 through $2,800 $130 $84.50 $2,801 through $3,500 $190 $123.50 $3,501 through $4,200 $225 $146.25 $4,201 through $4,900 $265 $172.25 $4,901 through $5,600 $305 $198.25 $224.25 $5,601 through $6,300 $345 $6,301 through $7,000 $380 $247 $7,001 through $7,700 $410 $266.50 $7,701 through $8,400 $450 $292.50 $8,401 through $9,100 $500 $325 $9,101 through $9,800 $550 $357.50 $9,801 through $10,500 $590 $383.50 For valuations of $10,501 and over, fees are calculated as follows: Permit Fee: $625 for the first $10,500, plus a rate of $6.50 per additional $1,000. If the additional valuation ranges from $1 through $999, it is still charged the $6.50 rate. Plan Check Fee: 65% of permit fee. 2. 3. Fees apply to initial submittal and one subsequent resubmittal. If the resubmittal is not accepted, the applicant will need to begin a new submittal (including the plan review fee). C 4. The plan review fee will be paid initially. The permit fee will not be paid until the plan review has been completed and the application has been accepted. 5. Penalty. Whenever any work for which a fire equipment permit is required is started without first obtaining a permit, the permit fees specified above are doubled. For valuations in which there is no permit fee, a minimum penalty of sixty dollars will be assessed. 6. Fee Refunds. The fire official may authorize the refund of any fee erroneously paid or collected. The fire official may authorize the refunding of not more than eighty percent of the paid permit fee when no work has been done under an issued permit. 7. Valuation. The valuation of the work done must be submitted at the time of application for a permit. The valuation is the value of the work to be done and includes all labor, material, equipment, and the like supplied and installed by the permittee to complete the work. The permittee may be asked to verify the valuation placed on the work. When the cost of any proposed work is unknown, an estimate of the cost shall be made and used to compute the permit fee. Upon completion of the work, a fee adjustment is made in favor of the City or permittee, if requested by either party. 8. Inspections. Fees apply to an initial final inspection and one subsequent reinspection. If the reinspection is not approved or additional inspections are required, the applicant will be required to pay for any additional inspections. Fire Protection System Verification. The fee for verification that a fire protection system has been appropriately serviced by a fire department registered fire equipment servicer, for each inspection, is: 1 nineteen dollars for a. sprinkler systems, b. standpipe systems, c. alarm systems, d. rangehood systems, e. inert gas extinguishing systems, f. spray booths, and 2. nine dollars fifty cents for private fire hydrants. D. Safety Inspections. The fee for conducting safety inspections is eighty-eight dollars per hour with a minimum one-hour charge. E. Reinspections. The fee for conducting reinspections is eighty-eight dollars per incident, This applies to inspection requests beyond the allowable inspections associated with an original permit. The reinspection fee will apply when an inspection is scheduled with the fire department and the following occurs 1. The project or occupancy is not ready for the inspection. 2. Corrections that were previously identified remain uncorrected. 3. The site is not accessible and a return visit is required. F. Inspection fees as set forth in this section are appropriated for an estimated time spent equal to or less than one hour per inspection. Permitees are subject to additional inspection fees, which shall apply in a minimum of one-hour increments for each permit fee category, for additional time spent on inspection services to include code research and return site visits. Date Passed: Monday, October 19, 2009 Effective Date: Sunday, November 22, 2009 ORD C34488 Section 15 City of Yakima Police Department Gary Jones, Interim Chief of Police 200 S. 31-11 Street Yakima, Washington 98901 Telephone (509) 575-6200 Fax (509) 575-6007 Memorandum Date: March 28, 2019 To: Council Public Safety Committee and City Manager, Cliff Moore From: Gary Jones, Interim Chief of Police Subject: Community Policing update Citizens are beginning to contact their beat officers through the e-mail system. Community Academy began on February 26. Retired Officer Winston Mitchell was recognized by the Downtown Yakima Rotary during their Black History Month event on February 28. Interim Chief Jones made a presentation on our co Columbus on February 28. unity policing efforts to the Knights of Coffee with a Cop was held on March 13 at Tom Tom Espresso at the Soda Fountain. Detective Matt Lee made fraud/scam presentations to the Senior Community Services Program at Love, INC on March 20 and to the Lion's Club Conference on March 23. Our upcoming events are: March 29 — Yakima Police Annual Awards Ceremony, 5:30 p.m. Harmon Center April 5 — Preschool reading program at WV Library April 25 — Presentation on scams/fraud, Harmon Center May 9 — Coffee with a Cop, Viera's 516 W. Lincoln Ave. Please contact our community services officers at 575-6197 for additional details on upcoming events. Gary Jones, Interim Chief of Police SELF -REFERRAL, DEFLECTION AND DIVERSION WHAT IMPACTS ON THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM ARE WE TRYI NG TO MAKE? Better utilization of our limited and scarce resources. Overall system cost savings related to the operation and function of the criminal justice system. Provide a more particularized and appropriate response to criminal behavior with the ultimate goal of impacting future criminal behavior that curtails recidivism. Enhance the quality of life of the citizens in Yakima County, by addressing "societal" issues that intersect with the criminal justice system. Engage and build relationships with community partners that allow for creative collaboration on broader issues that intersect with the criminal justice system. 5\ 4 U f 4.l. 4.3 43 43 4.3 43 43 43 43 43 43 4S 49. 49. 4.i. 4.9. 43Up 2018 Yakima County Budget 2018 General Fund Expenses. U4,0020576 LIMITED AND SCARCE RESOURCES AND COST SAVINGS NAMONAMMieNSNSMANSAMMARAMARMARMARAMM 2018 City ofYakima Budget Pa rt.., & Recrearion & g111,011 -1g 60,.1.16 Ottler1',:tr,:rming SI 1 .32F4-ISi, Lon-trn & It / Other S, 111 ,111,104-0 111,1-1. "1,:_.$7, C.vms..14 Cornrculnity Elsnvloi..unvni Debt Serviice 4.op,1,11 unwrol $17t,I132,112 EquNprolent Irl411 Vv,a.ter 4.!Ili:1;1110n SZ.:F;17,e,n2 Wo,,tetFa 14Fr„ LIMITED AND SCARCE RESOURCES AND COST SAVINGS GENERAL GOVERNMENT FUNDS Operating Expenditures Council Manager Finance/Admin Municipal Court/Legal Svc Public Safety Public Works/Community Development Community Events Buildings Reserves Transit Hotel/Motel-Tourism Streets Total Operating Expenditures Other Financing Uses Total Expenditures and Uses 2017 Actual 321,725 515,816 677,999 5,802,080 995,003 31,868 1, , 807133 982,493 250,765 884,868 12,269,749 1,310,602 13,580,350 02'...:,:bqiAr,g0g04K4K4Kg0g0g0g0g0g0g0g0gOgir,g0g0g0gOgOgOgOgir,g0A'ih', 2018 CITY OF UNION GAP BUDGET LIMITED AND SCARCE RESOURCES AND COST SAVINGS 2016 Point in Time Data* 600 people living on the treets, in vehicles, WiV,#1,,,:ttiiSit19i61:36:363,63,63,636:36:36:36:36:St19iit19iit19iit19i63,N Alcohol/Drug Use Financial Limitations Family breakup or crisis Job Loss Resource allocation: 91 I , emergency rooms and clinics, police, fire and rescue units, jails, detox programs, public health system, judicial system etc. $40,000 annually in hidden expenses for supporting a homeless person in a piecemeal fashion. w1M4000441410e.sgw41,40000, ENHANCE QUALITY OF LIFE IN YAKIMA COUNTYAND FORGE COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS TO ADDRESS GREATER SOCIETAL CONCERNS THAT INTERSECT WITH LAW AND JUSTICE YVCOG — Housing First —Yakima County's 5 year Homeless Plan (2017) ENHANCE QUALITY OF LIFE INYAKIMA COUNTY AND FORGE COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS TO ADDRESS GREATER SOCIETAL CONCERNS THAT INTERSECTWITH LAW AND JUSTICE Crmiiinal iIin An Misdemeanors 2015 2017 5000 4500 4000 3500 3000 2500 2000. 1500 1000 500 0 # o Filed Misd, Cases Nuisance Crime: Crim.Trespass, Mal Mischief,Theft 3 or Shoplifting City ofYakima Avg: 3220 Cases PerYr. YDC Avg: 3853 Cases PerYr. — ENHANCE QUALITY OF LIFE IN YAKIMA COUNTY AND FORGE COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPSTO ADDRESS GREATER SOCIETAL CONCERNS THAT INTERSECTWITH LAW AND JUSTICE 2 18 Shoplifting/Theft eports* Eastside WalMart: 321 Westside Wal Mart: 85 Safeway (all locations): 90 Fred Meyer: 12 Target: 87 Shopko: 25 Home Depot: 45 Fiesta Foods: 25 2018 Shoplifting/Theft Reports 4% *Police respond to about 50% of all theft/shoplifting calls in the City ofYakima. 46% • Eastside VValMart • Westside Walmart All Safeways Fred Meyer Target • Shopko • Home Depot • Fiesta Foods ENHANCE QUALITY OF LIFE INYAKIMA COUNTYAND FORGE COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS TO ADDRESS GREATER SOCIETAL CONCERNS THAT INTERSECT WITH LAW AND JUSTICE 2018 Shoplifting/Theft Reports ■ Eastside WalMart • Westside Walmart All Safeways ;r Fred Meyer Target Shopko ■ Horne Depot ■ Fiesta Foods *American Journal of Criminal Justice, June 2017,Volume 4, Issue 2, pp23 1-254 (2017). Costs include Judge, Prosecution, Public Defense, staff and capital needs. Does not include law enforcement, jail or probation costs. ENHANCE QUALITY OF LIFE INYAKIMA COUNTYAND FORGE COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS TO ADDRESS GREATER SOCIETAL CONCERNS THAT INTERSECT WITH LAW AND JUSTICE Filings Felo # of Filed Felony Cases 3000 2500 2000 - 1849 1500 1000 2015:254 2016:283 2015 2016 2017 2018 Felony - All VUCSA —-• Linear (VUCSA ) Total case filing data pulled from AOC caseload reports. VUCSA data pulled from the Prosecutor's Office Justware program. 5\ \ 4 U f 4.l. 4.3 43 43 4.3 43 43 43 43 43 43 4S 49. 49. 4.i. 4.9. 4SUp Particularized and appropriate response to criminal behavior to impact future criminal behavior that curtails recidivism. YAKIMA COUNTY DIVERSION PROGRAMS Yakima County DUI Court Post conviction program operated out ofYakima County District Court Yakima County Drug Court Post conviction program operated out ofYakima County Superior Court Yakima County Mental Health Court Post conviction program operated out ofYakima County Superior Court Felony Diversion Post filing program for those charged with felony crimes. Caseload is managed by Yakima County Adult Probation Services. City of Yakima Pre -Filing Diversion Program Pre filing diversion program with the City ofYakima. Cases are monitored byYakima County Adult Probation Services. Cit of Yakima Communit Diversion Pro • ram Post filing program that addresses misdemeanor crimes for the City ofYakima. PRE -ARREST DIVERSION (PAD) COMPARED TO TYPICAL JUSTICE DIVERSION Pre -Arrest Diversion (PAD) Diversion that keeps the person from ever having entered the justice system. Behavioral health guided with criminal justice partnerships. Public health solution to better public safety — reduce crime and increase the quality of life for the community Typical Justice Diversion ■ Diversion that is initiated after the person has entered the justice system. Criminal justice guided with behavioral health challenges. A wide variety of approaches for a variety of reasons. E Caseload management focused. PRE -ARREST DIVERSION - 5 PATHWAYS Self Referral: Individual initiates contact with law enforcement for a treatment referral (without fear of arrest) Active Outreach: Law enforcement initially ID's or seeks out individuals (i.e. high utilizer of the system), a warm handoff preferably occurs between the person and treatment Naloxone Plus: Engagement with treatment as part of an overdose response or a severe substance use disorder at acute risk for opioid overdose. Officer Prevention: Law enforcement initiates treatment engagement, no charges are filed. Officer Intervention: Law enforcement initiates treatment engagement, charges are held in abeyance or citations issued with requirement that they complete the treatment and/or social service plan. 0"4.,,bir.i0'.4K4K4KgOit",04K4g,IAW'404g,i'liKg0g0A",W,IA'AAW"A",04K4g,t;04K4g,i'lik", SELF REFERRAL PATHWAY Recognition that substance abuse is a public health problem. Lake County Illinois —AWay Out Started on June 1,2016 I I participating police departments 395 participants helped 2016: 60 people 2017:209 people 2018: 96 people OFFICER PREVENTION PATHWAY (DEFLECTION) - LEAD PROGRAM Law Enforcement initiates treatment engagement No charges are filed Lead Program — King County,Wa. Low level offenders involved in prostitution and drugs to community based services Social contacts by LEA are also eligible for program Amt of drugs involved is less than 7 grams Individual is appears amenable to diversion Criminal history/conviction that limits participating Those engaged in drug dealing, promoting prostitution and/or behavior resulting in the exploitation of a minor are not eligible OFFICER INTERVENTION (DIVERSION) PATHWAY Law enforcement initiates treatment engagement Charges exist but are held in abeyance or issuance of non -criminal citation Requirement that the person follow through with services, treatment etc. SGT. MIKE HENNE -OFFICER PERSPECTIVE