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2-28-19 PSC agenda packetCouncil Public Safety Committee 2nd Floor Conference Room City Hall February 28, 2019 3:00 p.m. Members: Councilmember D. Gutierrez (chair) Councilmember Cousens Councilmember Funk Councilmember White (alternate) Staff: City Manager Cliff Moore Interim Police Chief Gary Jones Fire Chief Aaron Markham City Prosecutor Cynthia Martinez Public Safety Communications Manager Brad Coughenour Public Works Director Scott Schafer Agenda 1) Approval of January 31, 2019 minutes 2) Department Reports a) Fire Department i) Fire monthly report — Markham ii) Fire Department annual report b) Police Department i) Community policing— Jones ii) Beat officers - Jones c) Legal Department i) Yakima Domestic Violence response— Martinez d) Public Works i) Compilation of Safe Routes to Schools — Schafer ii) 2nd petition process in traffic calming requests — Schafer iii) Update on one way streets around Garfield Elementary e) Codes f) Yakima County Emergency Management Others: 3) New Business a) Proposed cruise night legislation revision 4) Other Business a) Public Safety discussions with Yakima School District — Gutierrez 5) Information items 6) Recap of future agenda items 7) Review items for committee reports to council 8) Audience Participation 9) Adjournment Council Public Safety Committee Members: Councilmember Gutierrez Councilmember White (alt) Councilmember Coffey (alt) 2nd Floor Conference Room City Hall January 31, 2019 3:00 p.m. Staff: Cliff Moore, City Manager Gary Jones, Interim Police Chief Aaron Markham, Fire Chief Scott Schafer, PW Director Cynthia Martinez, City Prosecutor Terri Croft, Police Executive Minutes White called the meeting to order at 3:00 p.m. Others: Tony Miller, Director YVEM 1. December 20, 2018 minutes It was MOVED by White and SECONDED by Coffey to accept the minutes as presented. The minutes were approved unanimously. 2. Department reports . a. Fire Department i. Annual statistical fire activity report Markham provided the annual statistical report for the Yakima Fire Department. He noted that this is different from the annual report that will be presented to council. The committee requested that future monthly reports statistics added to reflect year-to-date and month-to-month comparison for the current and previous years. There was discussion regarding the use of plexi -board to board up vacant residences. Markham noted that there was not strict guideline for contractors to use this material, primarily due to the expense. b. Police Department i. Community Policing Report Jones briefly addressed the community policing report to full council two weeks prior. Shift change has been completed so beat officers are in their new assignments. Staff is working on various methods of communication between the officers and the community. Command staff has been having briefings with officers to discuss the philosophy of community policing and are receiving positive feedback. Coffey asked about continuation of bicycle patrols. Jones advised that he will continue bicycle patrols through grant funding, but wants to expand by using evidence based deployment, not just focusing on the downtown area, but other areas where crime analysis can determine there are issues. Gutierrez would like to see some type of flyer or information that officers can leave with community groups to continue building on the initial meetings. c. Legal i. DV Response Martinez reported that the full council had approved the formation of the CCRT and that it will be led by the domestic violence advocate. Recruitment for the DV advocate is expected to start by the end of February. White asked if there were any opportunities for community volunteers to assist in the domestic violence efforts. Martinez would like to see the CCRT get to the point where community members could assist. Gutierrez advised she would like to see the draft state legislation priorities given to all the council members and lobbyists so everyone was on the same page when discussing the domestic violence priority. d. Public Works i. Safe Routes to Schools Schafer reported there are two current Safe Routes to Schools projects, Garfield Elementary and McClure Elementary. Garfield is in its second year due to having to obtain right of ways in 2018. All work will be done this summer to be ready for the 2019-2020 school year. Applications have been submitted for McKinley Elementary and Apple Valley Elementary. Staff should have additional information in June. ii. Traffic calming update Schafer presented a report on traffic calming requests under the new process. 20 applications have been submitted and baseline information was taken. Preliminary data shows 8 of the requests are at or below the speed limit and do not warrant traffic calming measures. Another 8 requests are within 5 mph of the posted speed limits and may require further evaluation. The education component of the traffic calming procedure will be initiated in these areas. 3 of the requests are at 5 mph or more above the posted speed limits and will require further evaluation. Education will be initiated. The final request was received only days before the meeting and is in preliminary data gathering stages. Gutierrez asked how long the signage would remain up during the education phase. Schafer advised it would be up for a few weeks, and also noted a report will be presented to the full council on February 19. Gutierrez asked what occurs after enforcement fails and the engineering phase has to start. Schafer advised that triggers the second petition. Gutierrez requested that the 2nd petition be brought to the next Public Safety Committee meeting for discussion. iii. School zone signage on Fair Ave. Staff is proceeding with adding two more flashing signs on Fair Avenue and an additional pedestrian crossing at Kiwanis Park. e. Emergency Management Miller reported they are working on a flood plan and preparing sand bag supplies. Schafer added that the levies are being dredged and cleared to try to avoid flooding problems, as well as making agreements with DOT for access to divert water. 3. New Business a. Public Safety discussions with Yakima School District Gutierrez asked for the support of the committee to make a list of priorities to discuss with the Yakima School District at joint meeting, particularly focusing on Safe Routes to Schools. The list will be presented to the full council for consideration when creating the agenda. Moore provided an update on the response from the school district to his letter requesting surveying of sidewalk/lighting/dangerous properties/code enforcement issues. They advised they would co-sponsor public forums, but felt polling was on sidewalks and lighting were City responsibilities. Their next requests would be Adams and Barge Lincoln Elementary Schools. They also felt they did not want to put parents in the position commenting on code enforcement and danger property issues and that would also be a City responsibility. Staff has reached out to the school district to find a date for a joint meeting and school district staff replied that a meeting couldn't be scheduled at this time. Mayor Coffey requested CaIly set a meeting with the school board president Mr. Navarro 4. Other business a. GRIT update The steering committee met for an update on village meetings with various stakeholders and the community. Working with ESD and YSD to reach out to select middle school students for mentoring and counseling. They recommended contracting with a former SRO, Gary Garza, which was approved by the steering committee. Also met with the project coordinator to discuss data needed to apply for future funding. Gutierrez requested a GRIT progress report at the February 19 meeting. b. Markham provided a report on the recent 911 outage. The incident started as a minor issue but got progressively worse. Text to 911 still worked during the outage and alternative phone numbers were used to contact the center. SunComm has requested a published number to be used in the event of an outage. (509) 453-9000 will be the E911 backup number and will be published by February 1, 2019. There are funds available for community education of the backup numbers through County E911 funding sources. 5. Recap of future agenda items • Public Safety discussion with Yakima School Districts (until told for certain no meeting will take place) • 2nd petition in traffic calming process • One way street update around Garfield Elementary Moore will follow up on: • Main Street Conference agenda • Information for domestic violence lobbyist • Scheduling meeting with Mayor Coffey and School Board • GRIT update at 2/19 council meeting. 6. Audience participation None 7. Items for council committee report • Traffic calming petition discussion • Upcoming Coffee with a Cop events 8. Adjournment Meeting was adjourned at 4:13 p.m. Dulce Gutierrez, Chair Administration Fire Suppression Fire Investigation Fire Training Fire Prevention Public Education 401 North Front Street, Yakima, WA 98901 (509) 575-6060 Fax (509) 576-6356 www.yakimafire.com MEMORANDUM To: Yakima City Council Thru: Public Safety Committee From: Aaron Markham, Fire Chief Re: Fire Department Update Date: February 11, 2019 The following report serves to list the activities and accomplishments of the City of Yakima Fire Department for the month of January. Incidents: • Attached are the incident reports for the months of January 2018 and January 2019. Fire Inspections: • Annual Fire Inspections- 237 • Compliance Re -Inspection- 183 • Fire Inspection Reports- 16 • Total number of inspections- 436 2018 Annual Report: • Attached is a copy of the Yakima Fire Department 2018 Annual Report. "The Yakima Fire Department is dedicated to providing quality public safety services to our community." Yakima City Fire Department Yakima, WA This report was generated on 2/11/2019 3:09:04 PM Breakdown by Major Incident Types for Date Range Zone(s): All Zones 1 Start Date: 01/01/2018 1 End Date: 01/31/2018 Rescue & Emergency Medical... 71.84% Severe Weather & Natural Disaster 0.12% False Alarm & False Call 3.46% MAJOR INCIDENT TYPE Fires Rescue & Emergency Medical Service Hazardous Condition (No Fire) Service Call Good Intent Call False Alarm & False Call Severe Weather & Natural Disaster Fires Service CaII 8.71% Good Intent Call 11.58% Hazardous Condition (No Fire) 0.60% 3.70% # INCIDENTS % of TOTAL 31 3.70% 602 71.84% 5 0.60% 73__ 8.71% 97 11.58% 29 3A6% 1 0.12% TOTAL a3-3 100.01110 Only REVIEWED incidents included. Summary results for a major incident type are not displayed if the count is zero. EMERGENCY REPORTING' emergencyreporting.com Doc Id. 553 Page #1of2 �Y� ailed Breakdown by Incident Type INCIDENT TYPE # INCIDENTS % of TOTAL 100 - Fire, other 3 0.36% 111 - Building fire 8 0.95% 113 - Cooking fire, confined to container 2 0.24% 118 - Trash or rubbish fire, contained 6 0.72% 131 - Passenger vehicle fire 5 0.60% 140 - Natural vegetation fire, other 2 0.24% 2 0.24% 150 - Outside rubbish fire, other 151 - Outside rubbish, trash or waste fire '154 - Dumpster or other outside trash receptacle fire 300 - Rescue, EMS incident, other 311 - Medical assist, assist EMS crew [320 - Emergency medical service, other 321 - EMS call, excluding vehicle accident with injury ;322 - Motor vehicle accident with injuries 323 - Motor vehicle/pedestrian accident (MV Ped) '324 - Motor vehicle accident with no injuries. 331 - Lock -in (if lock out use 511 ) !354 - Trench/below-grade rescue 381 - Rescue or EMS standby 424 - Carbon monoxide incident 442 - Overheated motor 444 - Power line down '451 - Biological hazard, confirmed or suspected 500 Service Call, other 510 - Person in distress, other 511 - Lock -out 1520 - Water problem, other 521 - Water evacuation 1531 - Smoke or odor removal 550 - Public service assistance, other :551 - Assist police or other governmental agency 553 Public service 554 - Assist invalid 600 - Good intent call, other 611 - Dispatched & cancelled en route 621 - Wrong location 622 - No incident found on arrival at dispatch address 650 - Steam, other gas mistaken for smoke, other 651 - Smoke scare, odor of smoke 1671 HazMat release investigation w/no HazMat 700 - False alarm or false call, other 711 - Municipal alarm system, malicious false alarm 730 - System malfunction, other '.731 - Sprinkler activation due to malfunction 732 - Extinguishing system activation due to malfunction 733 - Smoke detector activation due to malfunction 735 - Alarm system sounded due to malfunction 1740 - Unintentional transmission of alarm, other 1743 - Smoke detector activation, no fire - unintentional 1745 - Alarm system activation, no fire - unintentional !813 - Wind storm, tornado/hurricane assessment 2 1 21 96 12 422 12 5 30 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 16 5 1 2 2 3 4 2 37 12 68 1 11 3 8 2 TOTAL lNClDEENTS: 3 1 5 3 4 1 `v;38 Only REVIEWED incidents included. Summary results for a major incident type are not displayed if the count is zero. 0.24% 0.12% 2.51% 11.46% 1.43% 50.36% 1.43% 0.60% 3.58% 0.12% 0.12% 0.24% 0.24% 0.12% 0.12% 0.12% 1.91% 0.60% 0.12% 0.24% 0.12% 0.24% 0.36% 0.48% 0.24% 4.42% 1.43% 8.11% 0.12% 1.31% 0.36% 0.12% 0.12% 0.95% 0.24% 0.12% 0.12% 0.12% 0.36% 0.12% 0.60% 0.36% 0.48% 0.12% 100.08% EMERGENCY REPORTING emergencyreporting.com Doc Id: 553 Page # 2 of 2 tv� Yakima City Fire Department Yakima, WA This report was generated on 2/11/2019 3:09:51 PM Breakdown by Major Incident Types for Date Range Zone(s): All Zones 1 Start Date: 01/01/2019 1 End Date: 01/31/2019 Rescue & Emergency Medical... 66.41% False Alarm & False CaII 4.51% Fires 4.20% MAJOR INCIDENT TYPE Fires Rescue & Emergency Medical Service Hazardous Condition (No Fire) Service Call Good Intent Call False Alarm & False CaII Special Incident Type Service Call 10.42% Special Incident Type 0.16% Good Intent Call 12.60% Hazardous Condition (No Fire) 1.71% # INCIDENTS % of TOTAL 27 4.20% 427 66.41% 11 1.71% 67 10.42% 81 12.60% 29 4.51% 1 0.16% TOTAL 643 100.00% Only REVIEWED incidents included. Summary results for a major incident type are not displayed if the count is zero. EMERGENCY REPORTING emergencyreporting.com Doc Id: 553 Page # 1 of 2 Detailed Breakdown by lnciden Type INCIDENT TYPE # INCIDENTS 100 - Fire, other 3 111 - Building fire 6 112 - Fires in structure other than in a building 1 113 - Cooking fire, confined to container 2 118 - Trash or rubbish fire, contained 1 130 - Mobile property (vehicle) fire, other 131 - Passenger vehicle fire 142 - Brush or brush -and -grass mixture fire .143 -Grassfire 151 - Outside rubbish, trash or waste fire 154 Dumpster or other outside trash receptacle fire 160 - Special outside fire, other 170 - Cultivated vegetation, crop fire, other 173 - Cultivated trees or nursery stock fire 300 - Rescue, EMS incident, other 311 - Medical assist, assist EMS crew 320 - Emergency medical service, other 321 - EMS call, excluding vehicle accident with injury 322 - Motor vehicle accident with injuries 323 - Motor vehicle/pedestrian accident (MV Ped) 324 - Motor vehicle accident with no injuries. 352 - Extrication of victim(s) from vehicle 400 - Hazardous condition, other ;412 - Gas leak (natural gas or LPG) 421 - Chemical hazard (no spill or leak) 440 - Electrical wiring/equipment problem, other 444 - Power line down 445 - Arcing, shorted electrical equipment 460 - Accident, potential accident, other 500 - Service Call, other 510 - Person in distress, other 511 - Lock -out 520 - Water problem, other 531 - Smoke or odor removal .550 - Public service assistance, other 554 - Assist invalid 561 - Unauthorized burning 600 - Good intent call, other 611 - Dispatched & cancelled en route 622 - No incident found on arrival at dispatch address 651 - Smoke scare, odor of smoke .652 - Steam, vapor, fog or dust thought to be smoke 671 - HazMat release investigation w/no HazMat 700 - False alarm or false call, other 714 - Central station, malicious false alarm 730 - System malfunction, other 733 - Smoke detector activation due to malfunction 1735 -Alarm system sounded due to malfunction 740 - Unintentional transmission of alarm, other 741 - Sprinkler activation, no fire - unintentional ;743 - Smoke detector activation, no fire - unintentional 744 - Detector activation, no fire - unintentional 1900 - Special type of incident, other TO dAV-Ii'JC L EEMT�5: 4 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 6 46 13 329 12 1 19 1 1 3 1 2 1 2 1 9 4 2 1 2 1 44 4 9 57 7 6 1 1 15 1 2 2 % of TOTA 0.47% 0.93% 0.16% 0.31% 0.16% 0.16% 0.62% 0.16% 0.16% 0.31% 0.16% 0.31% 0.16% 0.16% 0.93% 7.15% 2.02% 51.17% 1.87% 0.16% 2.95% 0.16% 0.16% 0.47% 0.16% 0.31% 0.16% 0.31% 0.16% 1.40% 0.62% 0.31% 0.16% 0.31% 0.16% 6.84% 0.62% 1.40% 8.86% 1.09% 0.93% 0.16% 0.16% 2.33% 0.16% 0.31% 0.31% 0.16% 0.16% 0.16% 0.62% 0.31% 0.16% 100.00% Only REVIEWED incidents included. Summary results for a major incident type are not displayed if the count is zero. EMERGENCY REPORTING emergencyreporting.com Doc Id 553 Page #2of2 LETTER FROM THE CHIEF T ORGANIZATIONAL CHART 2 ALARM STATISTICS 3 RESPONSE TIME STANDARDS 4-5 FIRE PREVENTION & EDUCATION DIVISION 6 TRAINING DIVISION 7 FIRE & LIFE SAFETY DIVISION 8 SUNCOM,M 9-10 Message from the Fire Chief February 19, 2019 TvY OF `v :i YAK1NIA STATION Honorable Mayor, members of the Yakima City Council and City Manager, The Yakima Fire Department experienced numerous changes during the course of 2018. As your Fire Chief, I want you to know we are continuously evaluating the ways in which we provide the essential delivery of services to the residents of Yakima, in an effort to be as effective and efficient as possible. The most valuable asset to our department is our members; the men and women who are our responders, our 911 communications team and our support personnel, a team that responded to over ten thousand emergency incidents throughout 2018. As a department that is responsible for the mitigation of all risks and hazards, our members have countless hours invested in training. This training js required to maintain our operational readiness and also provides safety to our teams and the residents of our City. The purpose of this annual report is to highlight the activities of each of the divisions that make up our department and to acknowledge the achievements they made in 2018. I would like to highlight for you that the fire department placed into service a new fire engine and a new ladder truck, replacing apparatus that had over 15 years of service. Placing the new engine and ladder truck in service allowed for us to transfer the engine being replaced to our sister city of Morelia, Mexico and the ladder truck we replaced will be transferred to Spokane County Fire District #4. Another highpoint for the fire department was the number of awards our Fire Prevention Division received for the programs we delivered to our residents and schools. On behalf of the entire department, I want to thank you for continued support. It is an honor and privilege to serve you as the Chief of the Yakima Fire Department. Respectfully, Aaron J. Markham, Fire Chief TOTAL ALARMS IN 2018 This includes incidents within the City of Yakima, the City of Union Gap, Fire District #11 and Mutual Aid Responses 1.49% ri Fires Service Call ® Other 0.29 Rescue & Emergency Medical Service m Hazardous Condition - No Fire o Good Intent Call False Alarm & False CaII Major Incident Type # of Incidents % of Total Fires 591 5.87% Rescue & Emergency Medical Service 6375 63.35% Hazardous Condition — No Fire 150 1.49% Service Call 1021 10.15% Good Intent Call 1341 13.33% False Alarm & False 555 5.52% Other 30 0.29% Total 10063 100.00% Response Time Standards Fire Suppression Turnout Time: The City of Yakima Fire Department has adopted a turnout time standard of 120 seconds for a fire suppression incident. The department should meet this standard 90% of the time. 2018_ Average- 105 seconds Met standard- 68% Travel Time: The City of Yakima Fire Department has adopted a travel time standard of 240 seconds for the arrival of the first engine company to a fire suppression incident. The department should meet this standard 90% of the time. 2018 Average- 226 seconds Met standard- 69% Full First Alarm Assignment: The City of Yakima Fire Department has adopted a response time standard of 480 seconds for the arrival of the full complement of a first alarm response to a fire suppression incident. The department should meet this standard 90% of the time. 2018 Average- 489 seconds Met standard- 66% Emergency Medical Service (EMS) Turnout Time: The City of Yakima Fire Department has adopted a turnout time standard of 90 seconds for an EMS incident. The department should meet this standard 90% of the time. 2018 Average- 88 seconds Met standard- 59% Travel Time: The City of Yakima Fire Department has adopted a travel time standard of 240 seconds for an EMS incident. The department should meet this standard 90% of the time. 2018 Average- 206 seconds Met standard- 70% Special Operations (Hazardous Materials and Technical Rescue) Turnout Time: The City of Yakima Fire Department has adopted a turnout time standard of 120 seconds for a technical rescue incident. The department should meet this standard 90% of the time. 2018 Average- 125 seconds Met standard- 66% Travel Time: The City of Yakima Fire Department has adopted a travel time standard of 240 seconds for a special operations incident. The department should meet this standard 90% of the time. 2018 Average- 291 seconds Met standard- 51 % Aircraft Rescue and Firefighting (ARFF) Turnout Time: The City of Yakima Fire Department has adopted a turnout time standard of 120 seconds for an ARFF incident. This standard should be met 90% of the time. Wildland Fire 2018 Average -53 seconds Met standard- 100% Travel Time: The City of Yakima Fire Department has adopted a travel time standard of 240 seconds for an ARFF incident. The department should meet this standard 90% of the time. 2018 Average- 28 seconds Met standard- 100% Turnout Time: The City of Yakima Fire Department has adopted a turnout time standard of 120 seconds for a wildland fire incident. The department should meet this standard 90% of the time. 2018 Average- 144 seconds Met standard- 58% Travel Time: The City of Yakima Fire Department has adopted a travel time standard of 240 seconds for a wildland fire incident. The department should meet this standard 90% of the time. 2018 Average- 425 seconds Met standard- 27% Fire Prevention & Education Division The Fire Prevention & Education Division's main focus is to educate residents about the risks from fire, hazards and injury in our community. Community Risk Reduction is paramount in prevention to keep our community safe by reducing loss of property and life through education. In 2018, the Fire Prevention and Public Education Captain worked daily to educate our residents about the risks of fire, disaster preparedness, escape planning, improving health, and business safety education through safety messages, social media, local media, training classes and events within the community. Our Fire Prevention and Public Education Captain, Jeff Pfaff, received the 2018 Washington State Fire Chief's Outstanding Public Fire Educator of the Year Award and the 2018 Delta Dental of Washington Smile Award for his work in the community educating our youth and putting a smile on their face. All Hazards Community Education: Our Fire Prevention & Education Captain taught fire safety and emergency evacuation skills to all of the 2nd grade students in Yakima Schools, Union Gap School, West Valley (Apple Valley, Wide Hollow and Summitview) Schools, St. Joseph Catholic School and Yakima Adventist Christian School. Over 2,000 second graders learned what to do in case of a fire, how to call 911 to report an emergency and how to make an emergency plan for home. We also interacted with many of our preschools to show the kids that "firefighters are your friend" and to not be afraid of us when we are in our gear. Part of our commitment to Fire Life and Loss Prevention is our Smoke Alarm Program for those that cannot afford one. Since 2014, our program has been funded solely through a grant from Legends Casino. In 2018 our crews, with the assistance of the American Red Cross, inspected and replaced 258 smoke alarms and installed 40 batteries in over 130 homes in Yakima and Union Gap. Media Relations and Events: Yakima Fire Department's Public Information Officer, continually works with our local media to get the most timely and accurate information out to our residents. Today everything is accessed in a split second, making his role with the media a critical component to keeping you informed about emergencies/hazardous conditions that can affect you and your family. From breaking news to public education announcements, we work hard to keep you informed. 6 Yakima Flora Twaiaiag M In 2018, Yakima Fire Department's Training Division was led by Training Captain Alex Langbell and Training Lieutenant Joe Burbank and was overseen by the Deputy Chief. The Training Division, located adjacent to Station 95, utilizes its five story drill tower/burn room, training grounds, classrooms as well as other means to ensure that the department has the latest training in emergency response delivery. Throughout the year 16,454 training hours were logged, which included structural, wildland and Aircraft Rescue (ARFF) firefighting operations. Additional training that occurred includes hazardous materials, a motorized jet boat handling class for our technical rescue team, emergency medical, driver operator and administrative training. The Training Division also conducted two 8 week recruit academies, with a total of eight recruit participants. A total of twelve firefighters were on probation during the course of the year, four of which completed the 12 month probationary period in 2018. 7 Fire & Life Safety Division In 2018 Yakima Fire Department's Fire & Life Safety Division, comprised of three Fire Code Inspectors, completed a total of 5,766 inspections. Steve Manske, Tony Doan and Jay DeLoza are all certified through the International Code Council as Fire Code Inspectors. In the months of October and November the Inspection Division completed all of Union Gap's Annual Fire Code Inspections for a 4th straight year. Union Gap's Inspections totaled 786, while Yakima totaled 4,980. The Fire & Life Safety Division was able to complete initial inspections on 48% (2,257) of the 4,708 occupancies located in Yakima. 8 Type of Inspections Total Inspections in 2018 Annual Fire Code Inspections Commercial 2,274 Annual Fire Code Inspections Residential 441 Compliance Re -Inspections 2,649 Daycare Inspections 18 Fire Inspection Reports 248 Quarterly Inspections 33 Complaint Follow Up 12 Events 91 Total 5,766 SU 911 COMMU JICATIOIVS One of the Divisions that the City of Yakima Fire Chief oversees is SunComm (Yakima County 911). SunComm is a multi -agency and multi -jurisdictional 9-1-1 and dispatch center that serves the City of Yakima and Yakima County. Statistics: In 2018, SunComm officially began accepting 9-1-1 calls via text. After several media releases and interviews SunComm slowly began to see an increase in activity via text to 9-1-1. While we saw several thousand texts incoming to 9-1-1, of those texts only 201 actual incidents were generated in 2018. Total 911 Calls: 149,829 Admin. Lines: 146,976 Text -2-911: 201 SunComm dispatched the following number of incidents for the following agencies in 2018: Yakima Fire: 9,816 Yakima Police: Incidents — 91,484 Traffic Stops — 28,390 Yakima County Fire Districts: 4,503 Union Gap Police: Incidents — 6,909 Traffic Stops — 2,402 The National Emergency Number Association (NENA) call answering standard/model recommendation is that 90% of all 9-1-1 calls are answered during peak hours within 10 seconds. SunComm does an exceptional job exceeding those standards during all hours, not just during times of peak call volume. January: 99.87% in 3.886 Seconds February: 99.59% in 3.772 Seconds March: 99.57 in 3.962 Seconds April: 99.42% in 3.769 Seconds May: 99.16 in 4.005 Seconds June: 99.81% in 3.981 Seconds July: 99.53% in 3.864 Seconds August: 99.71% in 4.006 Seconds September: 99.39% in 3.894 Seconds October: 99.81% in 3.872 Seconds November: 99.78 % in 4.228 Seconds December: 99.73 % in 4.073 Seconds Personnel: SunComm has 36 total personnel positions. Three. Administrative positions consisting of a Director, Assistant Manager and an Office Assistant. Six Supervisors positions, of those, five are floor Supervisor and one Training Supervisor. Thirteen Dispatcher positions and Fourteen Calltaker positions. 10 Special Teams Tactical Dispatch: Since the inception of the Tactical Dispatch team in 2016, there has been much growth. In 2018, the team began planning with Yakima Fire for the Fire Coordinator position. Tactical dispatchers provide a much needed support position for the planning and coordination of single large incidents, multi - jurisdictional incidents and scenarios where several incidents are occurring at the same time. In January, the tactical dispatchers attended a course for coordinating several complex incidents, including acting as a liaison with emergency management in efforts to ensure proper resource distribution and documentation. Equally so, Tactical Dispatch team members continued training and deploying with Yakima's Special Weapon And Tactical (SWAT) Team. Dispatchers attended SWAT's full scale scenario training, which occurred at Yakima Training Center, deploying real-life scenarios to test responses. Tactical Dispatchers took part as scribe and timekeeper, documented the details of the incident, acted as liaison with the Crisis Negotiation Team and SWAT Tactical Command in an effort to keep a cohesive scene, all while keeping Suncomm updated with activity that may impact the center. CISM: SunComm's Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM) team is made up of four individuals trained to deal with critical incidents. This group of individuals assists those involved in critical incidents to share their experiences and emotions, provide education in regards to the reactions or symptoms of stress and possibly assist with the referral process for higher care if needed. This process is voluntary, confidential and informal. On average each member conducted 29 one -on - one's during 2018. We held 2 group sessions and responded to SunComm a handful of times to allow for adequate reflection time. TERT: SunComm is a part of the Washington State Telecommunicator's Emergency Response Team, otherwise known as TERT. This team deploys to other Communications centers in the event of large scale emergencies, allowing the employees at that those communications centers the opportunity to focus on their families, homes and personal matters while our dispatchers work the imminent threat of the event. Mutually, if SunComm were to face a large scale disaster in their area, other TERT teams would deploy and provide the same service to them. While our team did not deploy to any incidents in 2018, they maintained their certifications, held their annual planning meetings and were prepared throughout 2018 to aid in the event of any disasters. City of Yakima Police De artmen Gary Jones, Interim Chief of Police 200 S. 3rd Street Yakima, Washingion 98901 Telephone. (509) 575-6200 Fax (509) 575-6007 Memorandum Date: February 28, 2019 To: Council Public Safety Committee and City Manager, Cliff Moore From: Gary Jones, Interim Chief of Police Subject: Community Policing update Beat officers have started their assignments and staff is working to fine-tune communication vehicles between the community and the department. On February 8, Lt. Shawn Boyle visited preschoolers at West Valley Library and read with them during their story time. Officers will continue to visit the public libraries to interact with the community. Officers Erin Levy, Eli Huizar, and Lyn Thorn received the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Spirit of the Dream Award for their many contributions to the community. Community Academy began on February 26. Our first Coffee with a Cop event was cancelled due to inclement weather. Services staff is working to reschedule and add more events to the calena ar. Community Gary ones, Interim Chief of Police Memorandum February 15, 2019 To: Public Safety Committee and City Manager, Cliff Moore From: Scott Schafer, Director of Public Works Re: Safe Routes To Schools — Garfield Elementary At the January 31, 2019 Public Safety Committee meeting, the Committee requested specifics regarding the new `one-way" roads implemented as part of the Garfield Elementary Safe Routes To Schools Project. • Jerome Ave will become an eastbound one-way street from Custer Ave to 6th Ave. • Fairbanks Ave will become a westbound one-way street from 6th Ave to Cluster Ave. Campbell Lane will become a northbound one-way street from Jerome Ave to Swan Ave. This segment is to alleviate the bottleneck caused from cars traveling south on Campbell Lane and trying to turn east onto Jerome Ave. Memorandum February 14, 2019 To: Public Safety Committee and City Manager, Cliff Moore From: Scott Schafer, Director of Public Works Re: Traffic Calming - 2nd Petition Process At the January 31, 2019 Public Safety Committee meeting, the Committee requested a follow up on the City's new Traffic -Calming procedure as it relates to the "2"d Petition;" how it works and how is it initiated. City staff is responsible for initiating the 2nd Petition if the Traffic -Calming procedure is proceeding to the Engineering component of the process. This petition is presented at a Public meeting when it has been determined that the Education and Enforcement components of the Traffic -Calming procedure have failed to change the behaviors of drivers and/or a safety issue remains unresolved. The Public meeting is also an opportunity for City staff to report back to the residents of the affected neighborhood to discuss the data results that were gathered and have lead up for the need for a possible traffic -calming device. Input from the residents at this time is invaluable to City staff as to what type of traffic -calming device is desirable within their neighborhood. Traffic -calming devices to be considered include: • Permanent "speed indicator (radar)" signs • Speed humps • Traffic circles • Sidewalk kickouts/Curb Extension • Chicanes (designed curve in roadway) • Road narrowing • On -Street Parking • Traffic Island/Median The Traffic -Calming Petition (2nd Petition) requires 66.7% signature approval of the residents (one signature per parcel) within the defined project area for the project to proceed. This process ensures that the majority of individuals actually want a traffic -calming device installed within their neighborhood. Residents unable to attend the Public meetings will be contacted by written notification and follow up phone calls as needed by City staff. Attached is a copy of the petition form in both English and Spanish. It is our objective to work closely with the residents in providing resolutions to their safety concerns of speeding vehicles that best fit the situation with the least disruption and impact to their neighborhood. 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C _C >• a) 0.1 0 73 0 0 7' C a) O w E co E ' co Q Ca) CO 0- CI us (0 O E •(0 to 71.1 i 'C7 C 0. _ID O UO ® 'U E o �° cocot L CC O N aJ'c."3 {. a. .4.., > U C H Ca E0 ;O C Ca Vf a) L. 4.1 LJ 0 U El N O (0 . cg C a) � o 'N a) (o 'E E U it A' 1 v V ca` 1/1 O> CO Z.� o E o. 43 v a°o o ° 13 E ® 0 c :2,.. u, a) v: >.°o. u 0 a, • L o a) L .0 gis C Q (0 m 'o .0 C a) }cJ L a) v o N 0 L7' o E m c , .0 C 000 •2 U a) l0 cu Ln N 1. 0 O .0Li- O C a1' ' tn (0 d c f0 J (0 L U L, I— (moo L Zg O W } c:1 ILL 2 a d LL, 'to o L a) re CO a N E Q a 1-- U ,F0 cu , h fO Peticion de la Ciudad iniciada en una audiencia publica celebrada en Programa del Trafico de la Vecindad 2018