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12-20-18 PSC agenda packetCouncil Public Safety Committee 2nd Floor Conference Room City Hall Members: Councilmember D. Gutierrez (chair) Councilmember Cousens Councilmember Funk Councilmember White (alternate) December 20, 2018 MITUMP Staff: City Manager Cliff Moore Asst. City Manager Ana Cortez Interim Police Chief Gary Jones Fire Chief Aaron Markham City Prosecutor Cynthia Martinez Brad Coughenour Public Works Director Scott Schafer 1) Approval of November 15, 2018 minutes 2) Department Reports a) Fire Department i) Fire monthly report ii) Arson b) Police Department i) Community policing report — Jones c) Legal Department i) Yakima Domestic Violence response survey — Martinez d) Public Works i) Report on Safe Routes to Schools - Schafer e) Codes f) Yakima County Emergency Management 3) New Business 4) Other Business a) Public Safety Forum continuing discussion 5) Information items Others: 6) Recap of future agenda items 7) Audience Participation 8) Adjournment Council Public Safety Committee 2nd Floor Conference Room City Hall November 15, 2018 Members: Staff: Councilmember Gutierrez Cliff Moore, City Manager Councilmember White (alt) Jay Seely, Police Captain Aaron Markham, Fire Chief Joe Caruso, Code Administration Manager Brett Sheffield, Chief Engineer Cynthia Martinez, City Prosecutor Chad Stephens, Police Lieutenant Hallie Meyers, Police Recruiting Officer Terri Croft, Police Executive Minutes Gutierrez called the meeting to order at 3:05 p.m. Others: Luz Bazan Gutierrez Nick Sloan 1. September 27, 2018 minutes It was MOVED by White and SECONDED by Gutierrez to accept the minutes as presented. The minutes were approved unanimously. 2. Department reports a. Fire Department i. September fire activity report Markham provided a monthly report of calls for service and fire inspections. Gutierrez inquired if the rate of 200 fire inspections per month was typical. Markham advised it was. There was further discussion regarding who conducts fire inspections for Union Gap, with Markham reporting that our staff conducts those as part of the contract with Union Gap. White inquired about arson investigators. Markham advised that he has an investigator available on each shift that can make preliminary determinations, but no longer has anyone who can conduct the in- depth investigations, as that person retired. There was discussion regarding how arson investigations are conducted, including Yakima Police Detectives conducting any criminal investigations. Markham's goal is to have continuing education for his employees to get a certified inspector. Gutierrez expressed her concerns with the progress of arson investigations, understanding the lack of evidence and FTE to conduct the investigation. She asked if all resources had been exhausted to reduce arson. Seely advised that patrols can be restructured with the proper analysis of arson crimes. Gutierrez asked if the cost to certify an investigator is within the current budget or would it be over? Markham advised that the training and association memberships are free, but there is an expense in proctoring the certification test. Gutierrez requested that the arson topic remain a standing item on the committee agenda. b. Police Department i. Community Policing Report Seely reported that the department plans to implement permanent beat assignments in January. These assignments will last for one year, with an expectation that the officer will get to know his/her beat, the problem areas, and engage the community. The officer will be expected to attend community events and programs. There was discussion regarding how to let the community know who their beat officers were and engage with them. The committee requested Interim Chief Jones present this issue to the full council in December or January. Gutierrez asked if the school district could communicate the opportunities for interaction with the beat officers. Moore advised he would add this to his letter to the school district regarding Safe Routes to Schools. Seely noted that officers have been interacting with students by having breakfast or lunch with them. Designated Crisis Responder program Stephens provided a short history of the DCR program and its funding through the Trueblood grant. DCRs ride with the officer on patrol and are able to conduct evaluations of people in crisis in the field rather than officers having to wait for a DCR response. The program is helping with deferrals. Stephens added that Comprehensive Health Care had provided de-escalation training to all YPD officers. The committee would like to see ways for this program to continue after the Trueblood funding ends. iii. Police Recruiting Meyers reported she had been assigned to the recruiting position since April and has been traveling the state and adjoining states, attending general and military career fairs. White inquired about non- traditional options such as volunteers or security firms. Seely advised that there is high liability in these options. c. Legal i. DV Response survey ii. Martinez presented the comparison between the City of Yakima response to the model response. There is some grant funding available, however we do not currently receive funding. Martinez will look at grant funding if it is decided to move to a Community Crisis Response Team format. Martinez advised that most of the elements are already in place in our area, they are just not coordinated. There was discussion about having the domestic violence advocate function as the coordinator for the CCRT. Gutierrez would like to present the inventory to the full council but would like to focus some of the points. The item will remain on the agenda for the December meeting to discuss ideas to overlap coordination and advocacy, what agencies would be invited to participate, and support and direction for the CCRT. d. Public Works Safe Routes to Schools Sheffield presented the Safe Routes to Schools report. He advised staff is reviewing the school districts concerns and is working to turn them into actionable goals. The committee inquired if the school district had surveyed the families. Sheffield advised there was some surveying that needed to be done as part of the grant application, and Moore stated he would include that in his letter to the school district. The committee would like to see the program not just focus on sidewalks, but incorporating other safety measures. White would like to see the projects prioritized by the current "danger" level of the area. 3. New Business None 4. Other business a. 1St Street curb cuts Gutierrez asked if the curb cuts for police vehicles on N. 1St Street had been completed. Sheffield advised they were being incorporated into Phase 2. 5. Recap of future agenda items Arson investigations Domestic Violence survey Continuing discussion of Public Safety Forums The two topics proposed by Councilmember Funk, Public Safety Leadership and Drivers on Yakima School District property, were to be moved to the December meeting. After discussion, the committee members present did not want to continue discussion on these matters. Moore noted that the Public Safety Leadership topic was proposed by Councilmember Funk at the June 19th full council meeting and died for lack of a second. It was MOVED by Gutierrez and SECONDED by White to remove these two items from the December agenda. Motion PASSED unanimously. 6. Audience participation Nick Sloan spoke of the importance of the fire department public education captain position and asked for the council to reconsider eliminating the position. 7. Adjournment Meeting was adjourned at 4:35 p.m. Dulce Gutierrez, Chair Administration Fire Suppression Fire Investigation Fire Training Fire Prevention Public Education MEMORANDUM To: Yakima City Council Thru: Public Safety Committee From: Aaron Markham, Fire Chief Re: Fire Department Update Date: December 10, 2018 The following report serves to list the activities and accomplishments of the City of Yakima Fire Department for the months of October and November and the year to date statistics. Incidents: • Attached are the incident reports for the months of October and November, 2018. • Attached is the year to date response report for 2018 through the end of November. Fire Inspections: During the months of October and November the fire inspectors conducted the annual fire inspections for the City of Union Gap (per the contract agreement with the City of Yakima). The total number of inspections completed during this period totaled: 498 Annual Fire Inspections 202 Compliance Re -inspections Fire investigations: During the month of November we assigned two shift personnel to the fire investigations division to fill vacancies created by attrition. These two investigators have very basic fire investigation training. We will work with the training division in 2019 to provide them additional training that will improve their investigation skills. Fruit Packers Supply investigation is almost complete according to the assigned ATF special agent. "The Yakima Fire Department is dedicated to providing quality public safety services to our community." Administration Fire Suppression Fire Investigation Fire Training Fire Prevention Public Education Short term goals: 0 Station visits have been completed documenting improvement/facility needs. "The Yakima Fire Department is dedicated to providing quality public safety services to our community." Yakima CityFire Department Yakima, WA 0 This report was generated on 12/6/20182:3U:57 PM '509)575-6060 Breakdown by Major Incident Types for Date Range Zone(s): All Zones I Start Date: 10/01/2018 1 End Date: 10/31/2018 Rescue & Emergency Medical... False Alarm & False Call Service Call Fires Special Incident Type Hazardous Condition (No Fire) Good Intent Call Only REVIEWED incidents included. Summary results for omajor incident type are not displayed jfthe count iuzero. EMERGENCYREPORTING omomonorop mno.omn Doc m:asu Page # 1mu Fire, other 1 - Building fire imney or flue fire, confined to chimney or flue trash or' rub' bis'h fire,, co-int'a,in-ed "'034%- I Passenger vehicle fire Road freight or transport vehicle fire 1 0.11% Brush or brush -and -grass mixture fire 0.34% Outside equipment fire 0.11% i'_ Motor v6kicleacc`ident with no injuries. 31 3.49% Gas leak (natural gas or LPG) 1 0.11% I - Heat from short circuit (wiring), defective/worn 1 0.11% bve`r+ieaie­d'm'6to'r 0.11% �'_'Alilcraft 'standby 2 0.22% Water or steam leak 1 OA1% olice matter 5 0.56% I - Dispatched & cancelled en route 2 - No incident found on arrival at dispatch address Prescribed fire Steam, vapor, fog or dust thought to be smoke 1 OA1% I - EMS call, party transported by non -fire agency ocai alarm system, malicious false alarm 2 0.22% Only REVIEWED incidents included. Summary results for omajor incident type are not displayed jfthe count iuzoro EMERGENCYREPORTING omemonoyrepvmno.omn Doc Id: asu Page # 2mu Only REVIEWED incidents included. Summary results for omajor incident type are not displayed jfthe count iuzero. EMERGENCYREPORTING-=~~_ omomonorop mno.omn Doc Id: asu Page #smu Yakima CityFire Department YaAirr7a,N<4 0 This report was generated on 12/6/20182:30:43 PM '509)575-6060 Breakdown by Major Incident Types for Date Range Zone(s): All Zones I Start Date: 11/01/2018 1 End Date: 11/30/2018 Only REVIEWED incidents included. Summary results for omajor incident type are not displayed jfthe count iuzero. EMERGENCYREPORTING=~~^__ omomonorop mno.omn Doc m:asu Page # 1mu 100 - Fire, other f0i Building "fire' 11'1 tioo'kirig fire, confined to container 4 117 - Commercial Compactor fire, confined to rubbish 1 0.14% ire in motor home, camper, recreational vehicle Mobile property (vehicle) fire, other 1 0.14% assenger vehicle fire Brush or brush -and -grass mixture fire r`666iskfire, other 3 0.41% or other outside trash receptacle fire pecial outside fire, other 1 u side equipment fire Motor vehicle/pedestrian accident (MV Ped) 7 352 - Extrication of victim(s) from vehicle 1 OA4% 566 -­�ervic-e'ball, other 10 137% 531 Sm'o'keor odor removal- 1 0.14% o ice matter 2 0.27% �'fi Municipal alarm system, malicious false alarm 1 0.14% Direct' 'tie46F D"',' m'a-1ici6'u's-fa-Ise alarm 0.14% en ral station, malicious false alarm 3 0.41% Only REVIEWED incidents included. Summary results for omajor incident type are not displayed jfthe count iuzoro EMERGENCYREPORTING omemonoyrop mno.omn Doc Id: asu Page # 2mu Only REVIEWED incidents included. Summary results for omajor incident type are not displayed jfthe count iuzero. EMERGENCYREPORTING omomonorop mno.omn Doc Id: asu Page #smu Yakima CityFire Department Yakima, WA 0 This report was generated on 12/6/20182:32:15 PM '509)575-6060 Breakdown by Major Incident Types for Date Range Zone(s): All Zones I Start Date: 01/01/2018 1 End Date: 11/30/2018 Only REVIEWED incidents included. Summary results for omajor incident type are not displayed jfthe count iuzero. XEMERGENCY -_----'_-_ omomonorop mno.omn Doc Id: asu Page # 1m4 Severe Weather & Natural Disaster Rescue & Emergency Medical... False Alarm & False Call Service Call Special Incident Type Good Intent Call Fires Overpressure rupture.... Hazardous Condition (No Fire) Only REVIEWED incidents included. Summary results for omajor incident type are not displayed jfthe count iuzero. XEMERGENCY -_----'_-_ omomonorop mno.omn Doc Id: asu Page # 1m4 e, other Ming fire' 108 1A9% ther than in a building oking fire, co ine container 57 0.63% imney or flue fire, confined to chimney or flue 2 0.02% ei burner/boiler malfunction, fire confined mmercial Compactor fire, confined to rubbish 3 0.03% is or rubbish fire, contained e in mobile home used as fixed residence 1 0.01% )bile property (vehicle) fire, other 6 U7% ssenger vehicle fire 45 0.49% ad freight or transport vehicle fire rest, woods or wildland fire 8 .09% ish or brush -and -grass mixture fire 62 0.68% ass fire 26 0.29% Aside rubbish fire, other 17 Aside rubbish, trash or waste fire 19 U1 % mpster or other outside trash receptacle fire Aside stationary compactor/compacted trash fire 1 0.01% ecial outside fire, other itside storage fire 3 0.03% Aside gas or vapor combustion explosion ivated trees or nursery stock fire 1 0.01% erpressure rupture, explosion, overheat other eworks explosion (no fire) cessive heat, scorch burns with no ignition 3 0.03% scue, EMS incident, other 180 1.98% !dical assist, assist EMS crew 810 iergency medical service, other 213 2�34% IS call, excluding vehicle accident with injury 3907 42.96% )tor vehicle accident with injuries 229 2.52% )tor vehicle/pedestrian accident (MV Ped) 31 0.34% Itor vehicle accident with no injuries. 360 3.96% ck-in (if lock out , use 511 rication of victim(s) from vehicle 1 0.01% moval of victim(s) from stalled elevator mch/below-grade rescue nfined space rescue iter & ice -related rescue, other 1 0.01% ift water rescue 5 0.05% scue or EMS standby 4 0.04% zardous condition, other 14 0.15% soline or other flammable liquid spill 5 0.05% is leak (natural gas or LPG) 20 0.22% or other combustible liquid spill 1 0.01% emical hazard (no spill or leak) 1 0.01% r on monoxide incident �6trical' wiring/equipment problem, other 22 0.24% Only REVIEWED incidents included. Summary results for omajor incident type are not displayed jfthe count iuzoro EMERGENCYREPORTING`=~~_ omemonorop mno.omn Doc Id: asu Page # 2m4 441 - Heat from short circuit (wiring), defective/worn 4 0.04% erson in distress, other 71 0.78% 521 '-'Waferevacuafion' 1 0.01% 522' Water or stearn'leak' 18 0.20% Assist police or other governmental agency 30 Police matter 21 0.23% 426 4.68% Cover assignment, standby, moveup 1 0.01% 666`­G�o6d 'intent call, other" 106 611 - Dispatched & cancelled en route 856 9.41% 6�1 location 4 0.04% �ib'-­ lic"i'ous, mischievous false call, other �'-'b'ir'ect tie to FD, malicious false alarm 1 0.01% one, malicious false alarm 1 0.01% Central station, malicious false alarm 8 0.09% - Alarm system sounded due to malfunction 28 0.31% - Extinguishing system activation 1 0.01% Only REVIEWED incidents included. Summary results for omajor incident type are not displayed jfthe count iuzoro MEMERGENCY -___--'_-_ omemonorop mno.omn Doc Id: asu Page #sm4 Only REVIEWED incidents included. Summary results for omajor incident type are not displayed jfthe count iuzero. EMERGENCYREPORTING emergencrepomng.com Doc Id: asu Page # 4m4 City of Yakima PoliceD. �� 200S.3 d Street Yakima, Washington 98901 Dominic Rizzi Jr, Chief of Police Telephone (509) 575-6200 Fax (509) 575-6007 Memorandum Date: December 20, 2018 To: Council Public Safety Committee and City Manager, Cliff Moore From: Gary Jones, Interim Chief of Police Subject: Community Policing update Yakima Police staff participated in the Public Safety Forum held in Council District 7 on December 10, 2018. As a result of this forum, we have a renewed relationship with West Valley School District. Members of my staff and I will be meeting with the WVSD administrative team and members of the Yakima County Sheriff's Office in January to brainstorm ways to improve communications between the entities and form a productive partnership. With our officers' shift bid complete for 2019, we are now in the process of identifying officers to fill the "beat assignments". Additional information will be forthcoming on this project at the January 15, 2019 city council meeting, when I will be presenting on community policing issues. On December 1, Officer Mark Grow was promoted to the rank of Sergeant. We hired one entry level officer and one lateral officer in the past two months. Additionally, five recruit officers graduated from the Basic Law Enforcement Academy on December 14 and will begin their field training program. Although these promotions, hires, and graduations will help us begin to refill our ranks, we still have 19 commissioned positions vacant, including 15 officer positions. Staff members continued to interact with our community throughout the months of November and December. In November, Shopko sponsored an event allowing several area school children to shop for the holidays in their store. In addition to the gift cards provided by Shopko, other area business participated in providing a full day of fun for the students. They had breakfast at Waffles Cafe, had a book reading at Inklings Bookstore, where they each received a book, went to Quiznos, created their own floral arrangements at Gasparetti's Floral, and finished out the day at the Majestic Theater to watch "The Grinch". The Department received a donation of Christmas gifts from the students of Davis High School's Interact Club for officers to give out to children in the community throughout the holiday season. Officers also participated in an annual Christmas shopping trip on December 20th with several students nominated by the schools and school resource officers. Without a corporate sponsor this year, 13 participating officers spent their own funds to help these needy families. On November 30th, department staff made contributions to O'Hana Mammography Center and Children's Wishes and Dreams. Sgt. Jim Moore coordinated a fundraiser selling pink ribbons in October that were displayed on patrol cars to support O'Hana. Officer Jeff Miller was responsible for the department's No Shave November fundraiser for Children's Wishes and Dreams. Several men of the Yakima Police Department were allowed to forgo shaving for the month and donated what they would have spent on shaving supplies to the fundraiser. The Yakima Police Patrolman's Association matched the funds raised. The department was presented a check from Steve Hahn Auto Group to support our community outreach efforts. Gary Jones, Interim Chief of Police CITY OF YAKIMA LEGAL DEPARTMENT 200 South Third Street, 2nd Fl. I Yakima, WA 98901 P: 509.575.6030 1 F: 509.575.6160 PRIVILEGED AND CONFIDENTIAL: COVERED BY THE ATTORNEY-CLIENT AND ATTORNEY WORK PRODUCT PRIVILEGES MEMORANDUM September 30, 2016 TO: Dulce Gutierrez, Chair of the Public Safety Committee Holly Cousins, Public Safety Committee Kay Funk, Public Safety Committee FROM: Cynthia Martinez, City Prosecutor SUBJECT: Survey of City of Yakima Response Attached is a spreadsheet comparing the City of Yakima domestic violence response to the Blueprint for Safety model response. The Blueprint for Safety model response was developed using the data collected from the Minnesota Coordinated Community Response to Domestic Violence and is considered an evidence based response. At the heart of the Blue Print for Safety model is the Coordinated Community Response Team (CCRT). Coordinated in that the team shares common goals and works cooperatively to ensure that their actions further the common goals and also enable other agencies to fulfill their goals. The training I attended in July was focused on measuring CCRT results. At the training, teams from around the country shared their collective goals. I noted common themes among the goals, which are as follows: Protect the victim, do no harm to the victim, and hold the defendant accountable. Every policy and protocol in a coordinated response is measured through the goal lens. I have proposed the formation of a City of Yakima CCRT. To prepare this survey I met with most of the agencies involved in the City of Yakima response. All of those I spoke with were interested in participating in a City of Yakima CCRT. While not all of the model policies may be feasible for the City of Yakima, I believe a City of Yakima CCRT could develop a coordinated response using available resources and make recommendations on ways to enhance the response with additional resources. cc. Jeff Cutter Cliff Moore Gary Jones City of Yakima DV Response Survey I Coity of Yakima DV Response Survey Public Safety Forum Monday, December 10, 2018 Harman Center Holly Cousens welcomed the erouo and called the meetine to order. Jeffrey Schapp, Assistant City Attorney o How to report a crime: call/text 911, online, in person, via non -emergency number o Call while the crime is occurring, if at all possible o All services are available in both English and Spanish o Caller can remain anonymous o RP may use phone to record evidence Q: Why can't 911 records be printed out? Requested records for DV call in 1995-1997 and was told that call logs were only kept for 30 days. (Katherine Kaiser) A: LE has 90 day retention. Unsure why she was unable to obtain records at that time. Q: Is Yakima considered a sanctuary city? (Joanne Lundberg) A: Not currently Q: What is the education standard of the report writers? What is the education status of the LEO who writes the police reports? Why are reports being returned instead of being prosecuted? (Earl Lee) A: Officers have varying levels of education, plus take report writing in the academy. The quality of the reports the prosecutors receive is excellent. Cases aren't prosecuted for a variety of reasons (burden of evidence, proof, etc.) Gary Jones, Interim Chief of Police • Neighborhood Policing Model o LEO is intimately engaged with assigned district. o Beginning in 2019, officers will be assigned to a specific district for the duration of the year. o Community will come to know who the district officers are and will be able to contact them directly with concerns • Sgt. Ira Cavin, Graveyard Police Sergeant o Officer Scott Gronewald & Officer Miles Imbert': officers assigned to district 9 in 2019 Q: What is the number of officers on a graveyard shift? (Miles Franklin) A: Full shift is 9, minimum is 6 Q: What is the total number of officers at YPD? A: 138, and the department is down about 12 positions. As a result, the recruitment officer position was created. • Accountability o Using crime & intel analyst to get officers real time info. o Encourage community members to report all crimes o Use online reporting for those issues that do not require an officer o Community Services: Block Watch, SafeCam, what we can do as a community Q: When you say there are 6-9 officers working atone time, is that per district or for the whole city? A: Whole city, plus overlapping squads and emphasis teams. Nichole Sandino, YPD Community Services Officer • Block Watch o Networking of neighbors; Calling and reporting suspicious activity in your neighborhood o Three steps: host a neighbor meeting, participate in Operation ID, and receive signs at entrances and exits of the neighborhood Q: Years ago, there was a Citizens Patrol program? Is that still available? A: No longer a program in the City of Yakima. Block Watch is not an active patrol. Q: Tieton Green has a very successful Block Watch. Noticed an immediate decrease in suspicious activity when the signs were posted. (Marty Lynch, BW Captain) Holly Cousens: Is anyone else a member of a Block Watch? go Q: How many block watches are around the locations of the recent homicides at West Valley M.S./Park? A: Not very many. Statistically, a neighborhood with a block watch will see a 50% reduction in crime. Q: How would a block watch work in that area because people from other parts of the city are coming to the park? A: The neighbors around the park need to call and report any suspicious activity in and around the park, regardless if there is a block watch or not. Q: With the recent homicides, was there any knowledge of any activity/that something bad was going to happen? A: YPD is looking at the calls to the area. No major incidents. Mostly traffic related complaints. Will notice that there is a lot of blank space on the block watch map in the area surrounding the park. Encourage neighborhood to get out and engage with neighbors. Nothing is too small to alert your neighbors. Technology is available to make the conversation easier. YakBack. Q: I called the city in regards to an animal problem and no one ever got ahold of me. Q: Lady who broke her arm on 451h was never contacted back either. (Earl Lee) Q: If we call our city council representative, will they call us back? A: Yes. If the representative doesn't have an answer for you, they will find it for you. • SafeCam o Registration of home/business security cameras o Does not grant access to cameras; just maps their location for police use. Q: If you're in your house and someone is in your yard and you kill them, are you going to jail for murder? A: You can only defend yourself and others; not property. Consult your lawyer. Q: A drunk family member with a restraining order knocked on door and was bad mouthing me in my yard. He was challenging me. So I threatened to shoot him and the responding officers told me I couldn't threaten to shoot him. f hiaf Innac The violence and high number of homicides in WV is unacceptable at all levels of the police department. Staff is looking at what we're doing and what we can do. What are similarities in the incidents? Drugs. What are some indicators for community members that something suspicious is happening? - High vehicle traffic - Crime of opportunities - Dark, isolated area - Five minute vehicle stops; quick exchanges Calls create patterns. These are indicators to police of where to patrol. Community members are encouraged to report all crimes. Neighborhood policing will allow officers to become better at one-on-one engagement in the district. Better staffing. Expanding emphasis teams (gangs, etc.) Q: What about when it is neighborhood kids causing problems and committing crimes? Rentals bring in more youth. A: Call to report. Get block watch involved. For rentals, landlords can become members of YPD's Crime Free Rental Housing program. Q: What class of drugs are involved in these crimes? A: Marijuana, which is still illegal of youth; Opioids (fentanyl laced pills); classic street level drugs (cocaine is at a high price right now, so users are turning to meth, cheaper drugs) Q: I've heard fentanyl is easy to make. What exactly is it? A: Fentanyl is not necessarily easy to make, but easy to obtain. Fentanyl is used for pain management, much like morphine. Q: What does the narcotics unit do with the narcotics after the case is over? A: Taken to a certified incinerator twice a year. Q: The population density in West Valley has increased dramatically. A: Possible redistrict in the future. Districts are based on crime, traffic, population. District was created before the annexation, so its size may be skewed. Officers respond to 57,000 calls per year in the city. District 9 has a large geographical area. Q: Reflection of recent WV homicides: what should we be doing going forward? A: Multi phase approach 1. Law Enforcement 2. Community involvement 3. Environmental factors: securing, patrolling, lighting Q: I have lived next to the park since 2002 and have called the police and Parks & Rec about the gates being locked. When it was a county park, the gates were locked from dusk to dawn. In the last few years, the gates are no longer locked (specifically the 801h Ave. entrance, which the gate was crashed into and removed). Parks & Rec says the PD doesn't want to lock it. PD says Parks & Rec doesn't want to lock it. (Andrea Gonzalez Stone) A: Ken Wilkinson, Parks & Rec Director; Opening and closing gates causes problems. Parks & Rec wanted PD to be able to patrol the park at night from both sides of the park. Emphasizes calling police when anything is happening at the park. At the very least, using YakBack to report. This shows PD that things are happening at the park. Q: What about better lighting at the park? A: Parks & Rec strongly believes in the power of lighting. It is in the long term plans for the park. Q: Moved to Yakima six months ago from an area with an organized block watch and a listing of neighbors. Believes a lot of issues can be policed themselves. Q: All summer long, a group of campers and tents with up to 12 people were camping at the park. Should this be reported? A: Yes, this is against city ordinance. City parks close at 10:00 pm. Call PD. Q: Crime stems not from the kids, but from the environment in which they're raised. Broken homes, abuse, and alcohol. Q: Son was friend with latest homicide victim. Asked him what could be done and he suggested lighting at the park. Kids are going back into the woods, needles are scattered on the ground. More needles are found when the gates are not locked. Teens need something to do. Drugs are too easy to turn to when kids are bored. The homicide victims were "good kids." f'R:"i1iiMrAT Ord City is working with the county to make improvements to Wide Hollow Creek. Should be done in 2020. Q: Can kids be talked to at school? A: SRO's in the Yakima School District. Seven total officers plus one sergeant. We are seeing the rewards of the program. No officers in the WV School District. Q: Marty Lynch, Pioneer of Drug Court. We, as a society, don't emphasize prevention and healthy lifestyles anymore. Kids are choosing drugs to feel good instead of healthy lifestyles and exercise. We need clubs for kids. Kids are becoming destructive and suicidal because they don't have a core group of friends. The WV Park has been a problem since the mid 90's and it has now come to violence. Chief Jones The City Manager and Police were invited to FourSquare church on 12/05 to meet with area youth groups. There were approximately 200 kids (age11-18) and 20 police officers. More and more young offenders are becoming armed. How are they getting them? Q: How do we get this message into the schools? A: Police department and school district Holly Cousens Council members sit on committees. Holly is currently sitting on Public Safety Committee. Q: Has lived in Yakima since 1987. Two years ago, there was a meeting at Davis HS with a small number in attendance. The police department was there and the public spoke out about the issues in Yakima. Nothing came out of the meeting as a resolution. The police department didn't pay attention at that time. We have an expert in town in juvenile rehab and mental health. Earl Lee has the tools and expertise available to our community and is paid little attention in the city. (Matthew Lunstrom) Q: First gang prevention program in Yakima. #1 book Music Therapy Reconnection. Should be used as an excellent resource in our city. Used by doctors and programs all over the world. (Earl Lee) Q: WV Park needs lighting, gates, and possibly a park ranger. How do we get the funds we need to make it happen? A: If it's a funds issue, we need to hear ideas from the community. Q: Lives next to the park since 2006. Calls Parks & Rec and the PD. Has noticed increased patrols. Speed bumps slow things down. Wants gates—the police need access through the gates at night, but the public does not. Will prevent troublemakers at night because they won't walk in. Great idea for the county to remove plants. Redevelop the creek as part of the park instead of a hiding spot. Lighting is needed. Neighbors are discouraged because of the lack of response. (Tim McCoy) Q: Wondering about the feasibility of cameras at the park. What about kid forums—not just one, but something to be built on and youth leaders developed. Gather license plates, descriptions of activity in park without putting yourself in harm's way. Holly Cousens Thanks everyone for coming and closes the meeting.