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09/18/2018 12A Council General Information1 BUSINESS OF THE CITY COUNCIL YAKIMA, WASHINGTON AGENDASTATEMENT Item No. 12.A. For Meeting of: September 18, 2018 ITEM TITLE: Council General Information SUBMITTED BY: Sonya Clear Tee, City Clerk SUMMARY EXPLANATION: 1. Memo to Council regarding school sidewalk questions 2. 2019 State and Federal Legislative Priorities adopted by the Council at its September 11, 2018 regular meeting 3. City of Yakima Strategic Plan 4. 2nd Quarter Municipal Court Statistics Report 5. Preliminary Council Agenda 6. City Meeting Schedule 7. Preliminary Future Activities Calendar ITEM BUDGETED: STRATEGIC PRIORITY: APPROVED FOR SUBMITTAL: STAFF RECOMMENDATION: BOARD/COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION: ATTACHMENTS: Description D memo D state D federal D strategic plan Upload Date 9,/12/2018 9/12/2018 9/12'2018 9/13/2018 Type Coker Memo Coker Memo Coyer Memo Coyer Memo o court report 0 info 9/12/2018 9;13/2018 2 Coker Memo Coyer Memo 3 MEMORAND UM September 12, 2018 TO: Mayor Kathy Coffey Members of City Council FROM: Scott Schafer, Director of Public Works Brett Sheffield, PE, Chief Engineer Robert Desgrosellier, Senior Engineer SUBJECT: 2018 Capital Improvement Projects: 2"d Quarter Response to Council questions from 9-11-2018 During the 2018 Capital Improvement Projects, 2nd Quarter presentation at the 9-11-2018 Council meeting, questions were asked requesting the scope of construction at McClure and Garfield Schools. Councilman White asked about McClure School proposed sidewalk locations. Sidewalk construction segments for McClure School scheduled for summer 2020 are: W. Prasch Avenue, south side, from 20th to 22nd Avenues; W. Viola Avenue, south side, from 20th Avenue westerly for 1/2 block; W. Viola Avenue, south side, from 21st to 22nd Avenues; W. Viola Avenue, south side, from 130 feet east of 24th to 24th Avenue; Lila Avenue, south side, from 24th Avenue to Karr Avenue; Construction will include ADA ramps on all of these segments; Painted crosswalks will be added on five different crossings. Councilwoman Gutierrez asked about Garfield School proposed sidewalk locations. Sidewalk construction segments for Garfield School scheduled for summer 2019 are: N. 6th Ave., west side, from Jerome to existing walk at the alley between Swan & Willow. The above sidewalk area will include curb, gutter and storm drainage. Campbell Lane, east side, from Jerome to Willow Street. ADA ramps & new painted crosswalks will be placed on new sidewalk segments above. ADA ramps & a new painted crosswalk will be constructed on Fairbanks at the midblock point to direct school ped traffic to the main walkway to Garfield School. If there are further questions please let us know. 1 4 City of Yakima 2019 State Legislative Priorities Actively Pursue - Increased state funding to support local efforts to provide homeless services and affordable housing, including incentives for private developers to invest in low -to -moderate income housing - Replacing the one percent property tax revenue limit with a limit tied to cost drivers (SB 5772 — HB 1764) - Legislation designed to address the high rate of domestic violence present in Washington State (SHB 2820) - Equitable distribution of marijuana excise tax revenue to local government (SB 6552 — HB 2124) - Increased state funding to support local gang prevention, intervention, and suppression programs based on data generated from Yakima's pilot program Support - Efforts to reform and enhance the state behavioral health system - Increased state funding to assist cities in meeting indigent defense obligations (HB 2031 — HB 2012) - Full funding of the Washington State Basic Law Enforcement Academy - Legislation allocating one percent (1%) of the airport fuel tax imposed by RCW 82.12.020 to the aeronautics account to be used for airport capital projects (HB 2754) - Removing the July 1St, 2019 sunset language from RCW 43.43.960, which would allow "all risk resources" mobilizations to continue (HB 2508) Monitor - Legislation providing greater flexibility in the use of public funds for economic development purposes - Legislation allowing municipal fire departments and fire districts to obtain reimbursement from parties found liable for causing an incident requiring a fire department and/or fire district response (HB 2460) City of Yakima 2019 Federal Legislative Priorities Actively Pursue - Comprehensive immigration reform, including passage of the Bar Removal of Individuals Who Dream of Growing Our Economy ("BRIDGE") Act, Development, Relief, and Education for Alien Minors ("DREAM") Act, or similar legislation - Efforts to address homelessness and to reduce barriers to affordable housing and human services programs locally, regionally, and nationally - Yakima Basin Integrated Plan funding requests - Funding from available federal sources to assist the Yakima Police Department in replacing its aging radio system - Increased funding for Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention ("OJJDP") and other federal programs designed to combat gang crime and violence - Development of adequate, predictable, and sustainable funding for airport capital projects and airport economic development projects Support - Ongoing funding assistance provided to local public safety entities through programs such as Community Oriented Policing Services ("COPS"), Staffing for Adequate Fire and Emergency Response ("SAFER"), the Assistance to Firefighters Grant Program ("AFG") and Local Law Enforcement Block Grants ("LLEBG") - Funding from the Transportation Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act ("TIFIA") program, the Better Utilizing Investments to Leverage Development ("BUILD") program, and other available federal sources for critical local transportation projects such as development of streets serving the Mill Site project, the North 1St Street Revitalization Project, and the Yakima East-West Corridor project - Continued funding of the Community Development Block Grant ("CDBG") program at current or increased levels - Development of pilot youth development programs (with accompanying funding) 5 6 SEPTEMBER 12, 2018 2018-2020 STRATEGIC PLAN FOR THE CITY OF YAKIMA, WASHINGTON PRESENTED BY: THE YAKIMA CITY COUNCIL 7 2018-2020 STRATEGIC PLAN FOR THE CITY OF YAKIMA, WASHINGTON TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE 1. COMMUNITY OVERVIEW 2 2. ORGANIZATION CHART BACKGROUND 4 4. MISSION STATEMENT 5. COUNCIL PRIORITIES 6 6. COUNCIL COMMITTEES 7 7. ROLE OF CITY MANAGER'S OFFICE 15 9.1.2018 2018-2020 STRATEGIC PLAN FOR THE CITY OF YAKIMA, 1 WASHINGTON 8 Community Overview Yakima is located in the south central region of Washington State and covers about 28 square miles. Sunshine is the norm with 270 to 300 blue sky days per year. The area enjoys four separate and distinct seasons with the summers being hot and dry while the winters are cool with light snowfall. Yakima is the largest city in Yakima County, serves as the county seat, and, with a population of more than 94,000, is the 11th largest city in Washington State. Most of the people who founded Yakima were of European decent, although significant numbers of African-Americans and Asian -Americans homesteaded in the area as well. Recently, the Yakima Valley has experienced a large influx of Latino immigrants, which now account for approximately 45% of the population in Yakima County. Today, the Yakima community enjoys a rich mixture of people from many cultural and ethnic backgrounds. 74% of the population has at least a high school diploma and 18% has a Bachelor's degree or higher. The median annual household income was estimated to be $43,956 in 2016. The cost of living in Yakima is below the national average at 95% and the state does not require income tax. The average sales price of a home is $192,000 and the average commuting time to work is about 15 minutes. Beyond K through 12, the area boasts a private technical college, a community college, a university, an osteopathic medical school, and a number of vocational education programs. Yakima has been the cultural, business, educational, health services, and governmental focal point of the Central Washington region since it was founded more than 125 years ago. Originally built along the then -new Northern Pacific Railway company line, Yakima has grown from its agricultural roots into a vibrant, diverse, metropolitan city. With a rich history and a bright future, Yakima is the Heart of Central Washington. Yakima's economy has traditionally revolved around agriculture and a wide variety of crops are grown in the Yakima Valley. These include more than 30 varieties of fruit (apples, cherries, peaches, pears, nectarines, apricots and berries) and vegetables (such as asparagus and eggplant). Not many people know that the region produces about 75% of all the hops (a key ingredient in beer) grown in the United States. While Yakima still relies on agriculture to drive its economy, over 250 manufacturing firms call the area home and produce a variety of products including aircraft parts, wood products, plastic products, recreational vehicles, and communications technology. Healthcare plays a large role in the Valley as represented by five hospitals and over 400 first-class physicians covering 36 specialties. Clinics provide a full range of treatment with open heart surgery, neurosurgery, and cancer care among them. Tourism is the fastest growing segment of the Yakima economy. More than 70 wineries are located in the Valley and regularly draw visitors to sample and buy internationally renowned varietals. Multiple craft breweries and distilleries utilize home-grown products in their unique offerings. Outdoor recreation, including water and snow skiing, fishing, boating, hiking, horseback riding, and white water rafting, also makes Yakima a favorite destination for people from throughout the Northwest and around the world. Finally, Yakima is home to a minor league baseball team (the Yakima Pippins, a member of the West Coast League), NAPB championship basketball team (Yakima Sunkings), and hosts numerous regional sports tournaments (baseball, basketball, softball and soccer, for example). 9.1.2018 2018-2020 STRATEGIC PLAN FOR THE CITY OF YAKIMA, 2 WASHINGTON CITY OF Yakima 2019 ORGANIZATIONAL CHART CITY OF YAKIMA CONSTITUENTS CITY COUNCIL CITY MANAGER Assistant City Manager City Administration Human Resources Legal Municipal Court Finance Departments Community Development Police Fire Airport Public Works 9 9.1.2018 2018-2020 STRATEGIC PLAN FOR THE CITY OF YAKIMA, 3 WASHINGTON 10 1. BACKGROUND This document updates the 2015 Strategic Plan. The foundation document identified five priorities, which are reaffirmed in this document: • Economic Development • Public Safety • Neighborhood Building (Improving the built environment) • Partnership Development • Public Trust and Accountability This document also builds on previously established critical steps to ensure alignment between staff actions and Council priorities: • Each City department will establish specific action -oriented goals, work activities, and performance measures to align with and make progress on the Strategic Priorities. • City Council policy initiatives and discussions will focus on the Strategic Priorities. • Senior management and employee performance evaluations will be linked with the Strategic Priorities. • Performance measures will be monitored and reported on to hold ourselves accountable for making measureable progress in achieving the strategic commitments. • Communicate quarterly and annually to the City Council and public through a Strategic Plan Progress Report. • Periodically review the Strategic Plan to ensure that it continues to focus City government resources on the issues most important to the community. • 9.1.2018 2018-2020 STRATEGIC PLAN FOR THE CITY OF YAKIMA, 4 WASHINGTON 11 2. MISSION STATEMENT On March 17, 2018, the Yakima City Council adopted the following mission statement to declare the manner in which municipal government shall provide services: TO PROVIDE OUTSTANDING SERVICES THAT MEET THE COMMUNITY'S NEEDS. TO GOVERN RESPONSIBLY BY EFFECTIVELY MANAGING AND PROTECTING PUBLIC RESOURCES. TO BUILD TRUST IN GOVERNMENT THROUGH OPENNESS, DIVERSE LEADERSHIP, AND COMMUNICATION. TO ENSURE THE SAFETY OF OUR RESIDENTS THROUGH RESPONSIBLE 215T CENTURY POLICING. TO SUPPORTTHE YOUTH OF OUR COMMUNITY SO THAT THEY CAN REACH THEIR FULL POTENTIAL. TO STRATEGICALLY FOCUS ON ENHANCING YAKIMA'S QUALITY OF LIFE. 9.1.2018 2018-2020 STRATEGIC PLAN FOR THE CITY OF YAKIMA, 5 WASHINGTON 12 3. 2018-2020 COUNCIL PRIORITIES 9.1.2018 1. PRIORITY FOR 2©18-2©2D Main street business development Committee Working On It? Economic Development 2. Community policing Public Safety 3. Safe routes to all elementary schools Public Safety 4. Youth development Healthy Communities 5. Mill site Development Partnership 6. YMCA Aquatic Center Partnership 7. MLK Pool Healthy Communities 8. Downtown Central Plaza Economic Development 2018-2020 STRATEGIC PLAN FOR THE CITY OF YAKIMA, 6 WASHINGTON 13 4. COUNCIL COMMITTEES 2018-2020 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE Holly Cousens, Dulce Gutierrez, Jason White, Carmen Mendez (alt) PRIORITY: MAI N STREET DEVELOPMENT + DOWNTOWN PLAZA GOAL This Committee seeks to: Between 2018-2020 to accomplish this goal, the Committee will: This Committee will review, consider and evaluate policies using two perspectives: The City will foster a dynamic and diverse economy for Yakima through collaboration and partnerships with other public, private, and non profit entities. The City will aggressively support economic development efforts that advance local development, quality, living wage jobs to ensure a diverse economic base, a resilient and growing City tax base, and long- term economic vitality for the City of Yakima 1. Promote and recommend policies that stimulate and support business development and growth along main arterial roads 2. Monitor policies and activities created to simulate growth along City main streets 3. Resolve the future of the Plaza 1. Benchmarking through a. Collecting data b. Analyzing data c. Planning d. Implementation 2. Equity Reports as ReferenceTool- 3. I nput from Community Integration Committee This Committee will discuss, analyze, consider, review data, input and ideas on the following topics: Code Social well-being Low-income Housing Homeless Equity Plaza Parking Airport Public Works Wastewater Treatment Other 9.1.2018 2018-2020 STRATEGIC PLAN FOR THE CITY OF YAKIMA, 7 WASHINGTON 14 STRATEGIES AS OUTLINED IN THE 2015 FOUNDATION PLAN 1. Build upon existing signature businesses and industries by attracting complimentary business clusters in healthcare, business and professional services, industrial machinery, food processing and distribution to expand and strengthen the local economy. 2. Continue the physical revitalization of the City to promote a strong first impression and community attractiveness to businesses. 3. Build on the community's history, heritage, natural resources, and livability to promote Yakima as a tourist and business destination. 4. Collaborate with downtown businesses to foster the growth and enhancement of the downtown as a destination through development of a Downtown Master Plan, enhanced public safety, customer -friendly parking, marketing, additional special events, an attractive physical environment, pedestrian -oriented design standards, and review of regulations to encourage investment while ensuring health and safety. 5. Execute a plan for the environmental restoration of the Mill Site along with consolidated ownership and infrastructure improvements to position the Mill Site as a prime economic development site for private sector development. 6. Optimize business development, capital improvements, and additional commercial air service at the Yakima Airport. 7. Community arts, culture, and recreational opportunities are valued by both residents and prospective employers as a measure of the community's quality of life. Accordingly, these sectors of the community must be enhanced. 8. Increase City involvement and partnerships with the Chamber, Visitors & Convention Bureau, Rural Community Development Resources, Central Washington State Fair Board, Yakima Sports Commission, Capitol Theatre, New Vision and other private entities to stimulate economic development. 9. Create a cohesive marketing strategy for wine, craft brews, and cider producers. 10. Ensure a balanced regulatory environment that facilitates business retention and growth. 9.1.2018 2018-2020 STRATEGIC PLAN FOR THE CITY OF YAKIMA, 8 WASHINGTON 15 2018-2020 HEALTHY COMMUNITIES AND NEIGHBORHOOD BUILDING COMMITTEE Kathy Coffey, Kay Funk, Jason White, Brad Hill {alt) PRIORITY YOUTH DEVELOPMENT+ MLK POOL GOAL This Committee seeks to: To promote a built environment that is safe and attractive now and in the future, and the City will also promote healthy growth and rewarding activities. Between 2018-2020 to accomplish this goal, the Committee will: This Committee will review, consider and evaluate policies using two perspectives: 1. Recommend policies that promote youth well being through comprehensive programs provided by partnerships between city, district, non- profits, universities, civic and faith- based organizations 2. Facilitate after school program information to all families 3. Secure resources for quality after school programs so that they can serve more children 4. Investigate feasibility of neighborhood focused capital improvements such as the Martin Luther King, Jr. Pool, lights, streets, sidewalks, which provide all residents with healthy environment 1. Benchmarking through a. Collecting data b. Analyzing data C. Planning d. Implementation 2. Equity Reports as Reference Tool -3. 1 nput from Community Integration Committee This Committee will discuss, analyze, Homeless Resources / Network Housing (Affordable, Low -Income, Senior, ONDS) consider, review data, input and ideas on the following topics: Code Issues / Code Enforcement After School Programs Traffic Abatement Safe Routes to Schools Road and Sidewalk Repairs OTHER: SOZO, Aquatic Center, Blue Zones, Equity Study, East YMCA 9.1.2018 2018-2020 STRATEGIC PLAN FOR THE CITY OF YAKIMA, 9 WASHINGTON 16 STRATEGIES AS OUTLINED IN THE 2015 FOUNDATION PLAN 1. Enhance the appearance of the City through: •Community-based clean-up programs •Volunteer code enforcement rangers •New downtown design and signage standards •Comprehensive graffiti abatement program •Business facade and streetscape improvements 2. Create a strong first impression of the City through entry statements at key City entrances off of US Hwy. 12 and 1-82. 3. Create Neighborhood Service Teams consisting of all City operational departments and neighborhood associations to enhance neighborhood appearance and community pride. 4. Enforce signage and code standards to ensure the aesthetics, integrity, and safety of the City. Review and streamline existing City codes related to appearance and signage. 5. Maintain and support public infrastructure facilities for drinking water, irrigation, sewer service, and sewer capacity. 9.1.2018 2018-2020 STRATEGIC PLAN FOR THE CITY OF YAKIMA, 10 WASHINGTON 17 2018-2020 PARTNERSHIP COMMITTEE Kathy Coffey, Brad Hill, Carmen Mendez, Holly Cousens (alt) PRIORITY: MILL DEVELOPMENT + YMCA AQUATIC CENTER DEVELOPMENT GOAL This Committee seeks to: Between 2018-2020 to accomplish this goal, the Committee will: This Committee will review, consider and evaluate policies using two perspectives: The City of Yakima will build cooperative and reciprocal partnerships with local, regional, state, federal, international, non- profit, and private entities, to enhance the vitality and quality of life of city residents, businesses and guests to leverage resources with other organizations. 1. Recommend policies needed to further large collaborative projects that enhance economic vitality, public safety, and community/ neighborhood health and well-being 2. Set policies that lead to the successful development of the Mill site 3. Monitor development of the YMCA Aquatics Center 4. Draft, review and recommend Rules of Procedures for City Council 1. Benchmarking through a. Collecting data b. Analyzing data c. Planning d. Implementation 2. Equity Reports as Reference Tool - 3. Inputfrom Community Integration Committee This Committee will discuss, analyze, consider, review data, input and ideas on the following topics: YMCA Aquatic Center Mill site partnerships Port District Schools Equity Wastewater Treatment Code Roads, sidewalks and streets Policies and rules of procedures Homelessness 9.1.2018 2018-2020 STRATEGIC PLAN FOR THE CITY OF YAKIMA, 11 WASHINGTON 18 STRATEGIES AS OUTLINED IN THE 2015 FOUNDATION PLAN 1. Work with Yakima County, State of Washington, and Federal Government to secure funding and approval for necessary transportation and infrastructure improvements to enhance access to the Mill Site. 2. Create a legislative and administrative strategy and partnership with the Association of 3. Washington Cities, State and Federal legislative delegations and administrative agency staff to address City needs and opportunities. 4. Partner with private, public, and non-profit organizations in creating more downtown Yakima events and activities that enhance community and downtown engagement, inclusion, and pride. 5. Create a Yakima Cleanup and Revitalization Effort (CARE) community partnership with faith -based organizations, service clubs, and neighborhood associations to improve Yakima's appearance and vitality. 6. Partner with the Downtown Merchants, Capitol Theatre, Visitors & Convention Bureau, Central Washington State Fair Board, and media in creating more community events and activities that foster more community and downtown engagement, involvement, and pride. 7. Partner with the Hispanic and Latino communities to address the needs and expectations of the growing Hispanic/Latino population in the community. 8. Collaborate with the Gang Free Initiative in eradicating gang violence. 9. Create neighborhood service teams to provide residents and businesses the opportunity to partner with City operations and departments including police, fire, public works, community development, parks and recreation, and code enforcement in addressing neighborhood concerns and opportunities for improvement. 10. Enhance volunteer opportunities for community groups. 11. Ensure the City Council is represented and/or meets regularly with the governing board of the following Yakima organizations: •Yakima County •Hispanic Chamber of Commerce •Yakima School District •YCDA—New Vision •Yakima Chamber of Commerce •Pacific Northwest University of Health Sciences •Capitol Theatre •Heritage University •Central Washington State Fair Board •Yakima Regional Hospital •Memorial Hospital •Service Clubs •Yakima Valley Community College •Sister City program 9.1.2018 2018-2020 STRATEGIC PLAN FOR THE CITY OF YAKIMA, 12 WASHINGTON 19 2018-2020 PUBLIC SAFETY COMMITTEE Holly Cousens, Dulce Gutierrez, Kay Funk, Brad Hill (alt) PRIORITY: COMMUNITY POLICING + SAFE ROUTES TO ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS GOAL This Committee seeks to: Mission Statement for 2018-2020 This Committee will review, consider and evaluate policies using two perspectives: The City is committed to providing a safe and secure environment for its resident, businesses and visitors to ensure healthy and vital neighborhoods free of crime. We are committed to increasing community based partnerships and crime prevention, fire and medical safety, code enforcement, emergency preparedness, 21st century policing and community integration. ________________ The Public Safety Committee . recognizes that city staff have specialized expertise in solving critical safety problems. This Committee will propose to Council policies which will support staff initiative, effectiveness and engagement. 1. Benchmarking through a. Collecting data b. Analyzing data c. Planning d. Implementation 2. Equity Reports as Reference Tool - 3. I nput from Community Integration Committee This Committee will discuss, analyze, consider, review data, input and ideas on the following topics: Safe Routes to School (CC priority) Fire Auxiliary Homelessness Community Policing (CC priority) City Codes Emergency Management (Co) Domestic Violence Emergency Medical Services Anti -gang efforts Brown -outs Police Auxiliary Traffic/Roads 9.1.2018 2018-2020 STRATEGIC PLAN FOR THE CITY OF YAKIMA, 13 WASHINGTON 20 STRATEGIES AS OUTLINED IN THE 2015 FOUNDATION PLAN 1. Promote and increase community based partnerships in crime prevention through: •Neighborhood Block Watch •Crime Stoppers •Neighborhood Associations •Schools •Businesses •Citizens for Safe Communities •Service Clubs 2. Ensure appropriate service levels for public safety services as the community population grows. 3. Proactively address gang violence through Gang Free Initiative strategies. 4. Conduct fire code inspections of all 4,000 commercial structures in the City. 5. Enhance downtown safety by operating visible and routine police bike and foot patrols. 6. Establish an effective graffiti abatement program focused on notification, clean-up, investigation, and enforcement. 7. Improve neighborhood safety by installing more street lights along arterial streets and poorly lighted areas. 8. Strengthen cooperation and partnership with Yakima County Sheriffs Office and add officers to the federal/state Violent Crime Task Force. 9. Construct new 9-1-1 Communications Center at the County's Resource Center in Union Gap. 10. Expedite the fingerprinting process for concealed pistol licenses with new Live Scan system. 9.1.2018 2018-2020 STRATEGIC PLAN FOR THE CITY OF YAKIMA, 14 WASHINGTON 21 5. 2018-2020 ROLE OF THE CITY MANAGER'S OFFICE The City Manager's Office is responsible for the daily administration of the City's systems and programs. While the Council's focus is on large policy decisions, including adopting strategic priorities and a budget to support those priorities, the City Manager's Office focus is largely internal and administrative; ensuring that Council priorities are addressed. The City Manager's Office is committed to... IMPLEMENTING STRATEGIES THAT ARE COUNCIL LED FOCUSING ON ESSENTIAL SERVICES IN AN INCLUSIVE, TRANSPARENT, COMMUNITY DRIVEN MANNER; AND DOING SO IN A WAY THAT IMPROVES THE FINANCIAL WELL BEING OF THE CITY'S GENERAL FUND. To support this objective and the Council's established mission, the City Manager's Office has the following vision: • Implement Council priorities by following Council direction, ensuring trust, accountability and integration • Provide outstanding, inclusive, equitable Customer Service • Regain financial stability and when goals are met, prioritize public infrastructure improvements, personnel and technology/innovation investments • Implement activities and services centered around needs of vulnerable populations including housing, public safety and clean city approaches • Maintain personnel levels to 2018 baseline and adopt proactive succession planning strategies • Create and implement a comprehensive Public Communication Strategy and function to inform and encourage participation in civic affairs for the entire community. • Enhance public engagement in the City by: o •Supporting more community events o •Celebrating the community's rich history and heritage o •Conducting community surveys/focus groups o •Leveraging media partnerships o •Promoting volunteer opportunities (e.g. Block Watch, etc.) • Increase community involvement through the creation of volunteer opportunities. 9.1.2018 2018-2020 STRATEGIC PLAN FOR THE CITY OF YAKIMA, 15 WASHINGTON 22 MEMORANDUM August 21, 2018 TO: The Honorable Mayor and Members of City Council Cliff Moore, City Manager FROM: The Honorable Susan Woodard, Presiding Judge Linda Hagert, Court Services Manager Isabel Cruz, Accountant SUBJECT: 2nd Quarter 2018 Municipal Court Office Statistics The City of Yakima Municipal Court operation was created in late 1996 and has been an independent judicial arm of the City since January 1, 1997. The Court Adjudicates all traffic infractions, misdemeanors, and gross misdemeanors cited in the City. The Court operates with two full time Judges, one of whom provides over the Court's activities, and a part time Court Commissioner. The City Council adopts the Courts budget annually; the Court is otherwise independent from City Administration. Following, please find summary statistical reports for Municipal Court's 2nd Quarter activity through June 30, 2018. Detailed reports are available from the Office of the Municipal Court. Prior year totals for 2017 are included for comparison. The following summary information for each quarter includes: I. Municipal Court Infraction Statistics II. Municipal Court Criminal Statistics III. Public Safety Education Assessment (PSEA) Statistics IV. Collection Statistics --Municipal Court Outstanding Time -Pay Contracts V. Outside Agency Collection Statistics 23 Yakima Municipal Court -- 2nd Quarter 2018 I. Municipal Court Infraction Statistics Page 2 2017 Prior Year 2018 Prior Quarters Apr May June 2018 YTD Total Filings -- Proceedings During Year: 2018 Infractions Filed 15,258 3,423 1,069 1,025 1,068 6,585 Violations Charged 23,086 5,144 1,529 1,553 1,678 9,904 Mitigation Hearings 1279 300 92 93 101 586 Contested Hearings 323 74 18 32 19 143 Show Cause Hearings 163 45 10 13 6 74 Other Hearings On Record 2,171 653 162 234 207 1,256 Total 42,280 9,639 2,880 2,950 3,079 18,548 Dispositions During Year: 2018 Infractions Paid 3,724 775 288 221 256 1,540 Failure to Respond 94 17 9 8 5 39 Committed 6,540 1,457 423 429 494 2,803 Not Committed 142 40 9 19 15 83 Dismissed 1,738 470 124 149 164 907 Amended 83 18 6 4 1 29 Total Disposed 12,321 2,777 859 830 935 5,401 Municipal Court Traffic Infraction Revenues $1,386,053 $349,358 $100,755 $132,795 $128,056 $710,964 Budget $1,367,599 $1,367,599 Page 2 24 Yakima Municipal Court -- 2nd Quarter 2018 II. Municipal Court Criminal Statistics Page 3 2017 Prior Year 2018 Prior Quarters Apr May June 2018 YTD Total Filings During Year: Citations Filed 3,167 764 231 281 247 1,523 Violations Charged 4,046 999 289 377 320 1,985 Trial Settings During Year: Non Jury Trials Set - - 0 0 0 - Jury Trials 1,817 479 122 169 132 902 Proceedings: Arraignments 2,753 683 200 209 216 1,308 Non Jury Trials - - 0 0 0 - Jury Trials 9 1 1 0 0 2 Stipulations to Record 7 4 0 1 0 5 Other Hearings 4,027 1,029 275 345 294 1,943 Dispositions: Bail Forfeitures - - Guilty 2,537 679 194 229 177 1,279 Not Guilty 2 3 0 0 3 Dismissed 1,518 357 120 151 117 745 Amended 263 53 15 16 7 91 Deferred Driver/Other 702 154 61 56 64 335 Prosecution Resumed 112 40 15 24 4 83 Appeals to Superior Court 5 1 0 0 0 1 Total Disposition 5,139 1,284 408 476 369 2,537 Criminal Fines Revenue: DUI Penalties $87,191 $ 23,597 $6,505 $8,431 $7,858 $46,391 Criminal Traffic 129,094 29,210 9,415 10,881 9,658 59,164 Non -Traffic Misdemeanor 66,042 14,383 6,069 5,093 6,773 32,317 Recoupments 115,146 31,544 10,733 11,148 11,030 64,455 Total Fines $397,473 $98,734 $32,722 $35,553 $35,319 $202,328 Total Budget $386,724 $386,724 Page 3 25 Yakima Municipal Court -- 2nd Quarter 2018 III. Public Safety Education Assessment (PSEA) Statistics * Required payments to State Public Safety Education. Revenue for these payments is included as part of the total fine. Revenue figures presented are net of these payments. IV. Collection Statistics -- Municipal Court Outstanding Time -Pay Contracts As of 6/30/2018 Outstanding Municipal Court Time -Pay Agreements** $2,245,489 **After judgment the offender makes arrangements with the court to pay their outstanding fines. If the offender does not make a payment in 30 days and does not make an effort with the court to make other arrangements to pay, the account is considered in arrears. A final notice is mailed to the person in arrears. If ignored the account is then turned over to collection. The collection agency is mandated by the state of Washington to write off accounts still owing ten years after the judgment date due to the statute of limitations. The statute of limitations covers all fines and restitution. V. Outside Collection Agency Statistics Following, please find summary statistical reports for Municipal Court's 1st Quarter 2017 Prior Year 2018 Prior Quarters Apr May June 2018 YTD Total Public Safety Education Assessment (PSEA) Payments $1,914,552 $508,937 $161,761 $148,301 $161,780 $980,779 * Required payments to State Public Safety Education. Revenue for these payments is included as part of the total fine. Revenue figures presented are net of these payments. IV. Collection Statistics -- Municipal Court Outstanding Time -Pay Contracts As of 6/30/2018 Outstanding Municipal Court Time -Pay Agreements** $2,245,489 **After judgment the offender makes arrangements with the court to pay their outstanding fines. If the offender does not make a payment in 30 days and does not make an effort with the court to make other arrangements to pay, the account is considered in arrears. A final notice is mailed to the person in arrears. If ignored the account is then turned over to collection. The collection agency is mandated by the state of Washington to write off accounts still owing ten years after the judgment date due to the statute of limitations. The statute of limitations covers all fines and restitution. V. Outside Collection Agency Statistics Following, please find summary statistical reports for Municipal Court's 1st Quarter ***Net of cancellation Page 4 2018 and Prior Years Outside Collection Agency: Accounts Assigned in 2014 6,309,371 Accounts Assigned in 2015 5,780,813 Accounts Assigned in 2016 6,258,403 Accounts Assigned in 2017 5,454,007 Accounts Assigned in 2018 2,342,944 Total Assignments $26,145,538 Dollars Collected Since 2014 $4,644,140 Collection Performance Court Accounts 17.76% ***Net of cancellation Page 4 YAKIMA CITY COUNCIL SPECIAL MEETING September 20, 2018 City Hall — Council Chambers 5 p.m. Budget discussions and preparation 1. Roll Call 26 2. Adjournment The next meeting will be a City Council Study Session on October 2, 2018, at 9 a.m. at City Hall in the Council Chambers Any invocation that may be offered before the official start of the Council meeting shall be the voluntary offering of a private citizen, to and for the benefit of the Council. The views or beliefs expressed by the invocation speaker have not been previously reviewed or approved by the Council, and the Council does not endorse the religious beliefs or views of this, or any other speaker A Council packet is available for review at the City Clerk's Office and on-line at wwwyakimawa.gov. The City provides special accommodations, such as hearing devices, wheelchair space or language interpreters, for City meetings. Anyone needing special assistance please contact the City Clerk's office at (509) 575-6037 at least two business days prior to the meeting. 27 CITY MEETING SCHEDULE For September 17, 2018 — September 24, 2018 Please note: Meetings are subject to change Tuesday. September 18 10:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m. County Commissioners — Council Chambers City Council executive session — Council Chambers City Council meeting — Council Chambers Wednesday, September 19 3:30 p.m. Arts Commission — 2nd Floor Conference Room 5:30 p.m. Community Review Board — Council Chambers Thursday, September 20 9:00 a.m. Hearing Examiner — Council Chambers 5:00 p.m. City Council special meeting — Council Chambers 28 Office of Mayor/City Council Preliminary Future Activities Calendar Please Note: Meetings are subject to change Meeting Date/Time Mon. Sept. 17 1:30 p.m. Organization MeetingPurpose Participants YVCOG Executive Committee meetin Scheduled Meeting Hill Meeting Location Tue. Sept. 18 10:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m. Wed. Sept. 19 12:00 p.m. 12:00 p.m. 2:00 p.m. 3:30 .m. Thur. Sept. 20 8:30 a.m. Brownfields workshop City Council Executive Session Scheduled Event Scheduled Meeting Mendez Council Scheduled Meeting City Council meeting 010 Board meeting YPAL Board Meeting TRANS -Action meeting Arts Commission Board Meeting Board Meeting Scheduled Meeting Scheduled Meetin• Council Cousens White Mendez White 5:00 p.m. Sun. Sept. 23 1:30 p.m. Mon. Sept. 24 12:00 m. Wed. Sept. 26 8:30 a.m. (T) Partnership Committee meeting 2019 budget discussion and fre•aration Scheduled Meeting Scheduled Meeting Coffey, Hill, Cousens (alt) Council YVCOG Convention Center Council Chambers C ouncil Chambers 4NaMiNailia OIC WA Fruit Community Center WSDOT 2nd Floor Conference Room CM Conference Room Council Chambers Convention Center Ca*to Theatre Health District Mayor welcome - WA State Judges Conference Ca.itol Theatre Board Scheduled Event Board Meetin• Mendez 3:30pm 5:30 p.m. Thur. Sept. 27 1:30 p.m. 3:00 p.m; Fri. Sept 28 9:00 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Mon. Oct. 1 5:00 p.m. Board of Health meeting Yakima Planning Commission Historic Preservation Commission Board Meeting Scheduled Meeting Scheduled Meeting Council Economic Development Committee meeting Council Public Safety Committee meeting Yakima Basin Joint Board meeting Welcome NAMI Conference Scheduled Meeting Scheduled Meeting White, Cousens, Mendez (alt) Funk, Cousens, Gutierrez Board Meeting Scheduled Event Mendez Coffey Council Chambers Council Chambers 2nd Floor Conference Room 2nd Floor Conference Room Halverson NW Convention Center Tree City USA Board meetin. Board Meeting Council Chambers Tue. Oct. 2 9:00 a.m. 5:30 p.m. 6:00 p.m: Thur. Oct. 4 9:00 a.m. 1:30 p.m. City Council study session City Council Executive Session City Council meeting City Council study session Yakima County EMS & Trauma CareCouncil Scheduled Meeting Scheduled Meeting Scheduled Meeting Scheduled Meeting Scheduled Meeting Council Council Council Council Funk Council Chambers Council Chambers Council Chambers Council Chambers Yakima County Resource Buildinc Fri. Oct. 5 8:00 a.m. on. Oct. 8 8:30 a.m. 5:30 p.m. Sister Cit Meetin Pension Board meetings Community Integration Committee meetin • Scheduled Meetin Board Meeting Scheduled Meeting Mendez Gutierrez White 2nd Floor Conference Room 1st Floor Conference Room Council Chambers Tue. Oct. 9 9:00 a.m. 11:30 a.m. City Council study session Chamber Board meeting Scheduled Meeting Board Meeting Council White ed. Oct, 10 10:00 a.m. 12:00 p.m, 3:00 p.m. 5:30 p.m. Yakima Bike Ped Committee Yakima Basin Fish & Wildlife Board Yakima Planning Commission Parks & Recreation Commission Scheduled Meeting Board Meeting Scheduled Meeting Scheduled Meeting White Mendez White Funk Council Chambers Chamber of Commerce 2nd Floor Conference Room YBFW Office Council Chambers Council Chambers