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8-23-18 PSC agenda packetCouncil Public Safety Committee 2nd Floor Conference Room City Hall Members: Councilmember D. Gutierrez (chair) Councilmember Cousens Councilmember Funk Councilmember White (alternate) August 23, 2018 M IU. Staff: City Manager Cliff Moore Asst. City Manager Ana Cortez Police Chief Dominic Rizzi Fire Chief Aaron Markham City Prosecutor Cynthia Martinez Brad Coughenour Public Works Director Scott Schafer 1) Approval of July 30, 2018 minutes 2) Department Reports a) Fire Department i) Semi-annual report — Markham ii) Suspicious fires - Markham b) Police Department i) Community policing report — Rizzi ii) RV parking issues on 18th Street - Stephens c) Legal Department i) Domestic Violence update — Martinez ii) Proposed amendment to shopping cart ordinance - Doyle d) Public Works i) Report on Safe Routes to Schools - Cortez (1) Definition (2) Current conditions (sidewalks) (3) Sidewalk needs (miles/cost) e) Codes f) Yakima County Emergency Management Others: 3) New Business 4) Other Business a) Public Safety Forum report discussion 5) Information items 6) Recap of future agenda items 7) Audience Participation 8) Adjournment Council Public Safety Committee 2nd Floor Conference Room City Hall Members: Councilmember Gutierrez Councilmember Cousens Councilmember White (alt) July 30, 2018 M IU. Staff: Cliff Moore, City Manager Ana Cortez, Assistant City Manager Aaron Markham, Deputy Fire Chief Scott Schafer, Public Works Director Cynthia Martinez, City Prosecutor Shawn Boyle, Police Lieutenant Brett Sheffield, Chief Engineer Brooke Goosman, Legal Terri Croft, Police Executive Minutes Gutierrez called the meeting to order at 3:05 p.m. Others: 1. July 3, 2018 minutes It was MOVED by Cousens and SECONDED by Gutierrez to accept the minutes as presented. The minutes were approved unanimously. 2. Department reports a. Fire Department Markham provided a report of the current year to date calls as well as the previous year. The report also included information on fire inspections. The committee encouraged monthly reports of any information the department heads feel is relevant to share with them, including any anticipated needs that the council should know about. b. Police Department Croft presented the community policing report. c. Legal Martinez reported to the committee that training was scheduled for the following day with city legal staff with David Soukup of the Yakima County Prosecutor's Office. The training will cover victimless prosecution and a victim's awareness class presented by the YWCA. She added that two prosecutors are scheduled to attend the domestic violence symposium in Seattle this year. Martinez explained the origins and purpose of the domestic violence protocol forms. She advised that about 50% of the intimate partner domestic violence cases have protocol forms completed, which is a good start. Martinez reported on domestic violence training she attended the previous week. She is looking forward to sharing the information and implementing some of the suggestions. Martinez updated the committee on HB1022 regarding requests for U and T visa certifications. The law went into effect in July 2018 and requires community outreach and information on who handles the certification requests. The information will be shared on the police department and legal department's web pages, and possibly on the city's web page. The committee requested a continuing discussion at the August meeting to discuss the articles handed out at the meeting. They requested a report that consolidates information on domestic violence statistics throughout the process from initial calls for service to arrest, court case disposition, and probation violations. There was additional discussion about having an on - staff victim/witness advocate. Martinez will provide information from other agencies at the next meeting. Discussion lobbying efforts regarding domestic violence issues. Partnership Committee is gathering potential issues for lobbying. Moore will assist with getting this subject to the Partnership Committee. Gutierrez requested staff provide suggestions for improving the process at the next meeting, even if it is only incremental steps to improve the process. re Mam 1fMUTIOMW Safe Routes to Schools Cortez gave some definitions of the Safe Routes to Schools terminology so everyone was operating with the same definitions. She presented information on the current infrastructure and needs for the schools within the city and the associated costs. Discussed prioritization of areas based on collisions. Discussed next steps for planning. Schools have their walking routes already defined. The state biannually funds Safe Routes to Schools funding. Some schools overlap with TBD and TIB projects. Gutierrez requested to have the routes confirmed with the school district and propose any changes. f. Yakima County Emergency Management Tony Miller from Emergency Management updated the committee on the upgrades to the Everbridge emergency notification system. They will be pushing residents to sign up with their cell phone information to receive emergency notifications. Promotion will be done through social media, also suggested an insert into utility bills. Kms►= a. YMC Chapter 6.55 Goosman presented a proposed change to YMC chapter 6.55. It is an allegation of sexual motivation that can be added to any charge to make it more specific. It does not change any penalties. It was MOVED by Cousens and SECONDED by Gutierrez to move the issue to the full council. 4. Other business a. Analysis of input from Public Safety Forums Cortez presented the items council requested be incorporated into the forum report. The report was incorporated into the governor's proviso, data points were consolidated, questions and answers were placed on the city's website, and a draft was created of the issues by geographical area. Cortez advised the RFQ for the project coordinator had been released and staff would receive final direction from the council on August 6 on how to populate the steering committee. Gutierrez requested definitions for the various participants (stakeholders, advisory group, steering committee), and the level of involvement is expected of each group. Staff requested specific names from each organization as to who should be invited to join the steering committee. Gutierrez expressed the need for the advisory committee to not only include those in institutional roles within the organizations, but also average people who are impacted by gang violence. Staff will receive direction from the council at the meeting on August 6 and report back on August 21. 5. Recap of future agenda items Consolidated domestic violence information Staff recommendations for domestic violence process improvements Updates from school district on school routes Public safety forum report for discussion. Gutierrez requested a working meeting of the committee regarding the public safety forum report. 6. Audience participation Tony Coursey of Yakima requested clarification on Council's trip to Ellensburg and if the old sidewalk lists were still available. 7. Adjournment Meeting was adjourned at 4:37. The next meeting is scheduled for August 23, 2018 at 3:00 in the 2nd Floor Conference Room. Dulce Gutierrez, Chair Administration Fire Suppression Fire Investigation Fire Training Fire Prevention Public Education 401 North Front Street, Yakima, WA 98901 To: Yakima City Council Thru: Public Safety Committee From: Aaron Markham, Fire Chief Re: Semi-annual run report Date: August 10, 2018 (509) 575-6060 Fax (509) 576-6356 www.yakimafire.com The following report serves to list the activities and accomplishments of the City of Yakima Fire Department for the month of July. Incidents: • Attached is the incident report for the month of July, 2018. Fire Inspections: • Annual Fire Inspections- 229 • Compliance Re -Inspection- 226 • Fire Inspection Reports- 21 • Special Event Inspections- 12 • Total number of inspections- 488 Short term goals: • 4 out of 6 station visits have been completed documenting improvement needs • 2017 year-end report work in progress "The Yakima Fire Department is dedicated to providing quality public safety services to our community." Yakima CityFire Department YaAirr7a,N<4 0 This report was generated on8/0/201811:4A:38AM '509)575-6060 Breakdown by Major Incident Types for Date Range Zone(s): All Zones I Start Date: 07/01/2018 1 End Date: 07/31/2018 Only REVIEWED incidents included. Summary results for omajor incident type are not displayed jfthe count iuzero. EMERGENCYREPORTING-=~^__ omomonorop mno.omn Doc m:asu Page # 1mu 100 - Fire, other f0i Building "fire' 11'1 tioo'king fire, confined to container 4 0.46% rash or rubbish fire, contained He property (vehicle) fire, other 1 OA2% assenger vehicle fire ��4� i�ru'sh or brush -and -grass mixture fire 17 1.96% Special outside fire, other 2 0.23% Cultivated trees or nursery stock fire �011 Medical assist, assist EMS crew 87 10.05% Motor vehicle accident with injuries 25 2�89% Carbon monoxide incident a or steam leak ��b�-'O'u6i'ic's'ervice assistance, other Sprinkler activation due to malfunction 1 0.12% Only REVIEWED incidents included. Summary results for omajor incident type are not displayed jfthe count iuzoro EMERGENCYREPORTING__ omemonorop mno.omn Doc Id: asu Page # 2mu Only REVIEWED incidents included. Summary results for omajor incident type are not displayed jfthe count iuzero. EMERGENCYREPORTING omomonorop mno.omn Doc Id: asu Page #smu A City of Yakima PoliceD. r• 200S.3 d Street Yakima, Washington 98901 Dominic Rizzi Jr, Chief of Police Telephone (509) 575-6200 Fax (509) 575-6007 Memorandum Date: August 23, 2018 To: Council Public Safety Committee and City Manager, Cliff Moore From: Dominic Rizzi, Chief of Police Subject: Community Policing update Below is a brief overview of the community outreach and other notable events for Yakima Police Department in the month of August: • Roll Call Cookout event — July 25 4:00 p.m. — 5:15 p.m. at Bethel Church, 1103 W. Mead Ave. • Officers attended National Night Out parties on August 6, 7 and 8. • Our Spanish speaking officers continued to make appearances on Bustos Media radio stations (KZTA, Radio LaGranD, and KMNA Radio). • A Roll Call BBQ was held on August 22 at Grace Lutheran Church. Residents of the neighborhood were able to interact with police officers and ask questions as the officers prepared to start their shift. • Bicycle patrols continued in the downtown area. Bicycle officers are out most days of the week and are also present at the Yakima Downtown Farmer's Market. • Foot patrol officer are out in the downtown core during First Fridays and other special events. • Members of the community came out to participate in the filming of the Yakima Police Department's lip sync challenge video. The video was released on August 13. • YPD vs. YFD softball game was held on August 17 Our upcoming events are: • Chief Rizzi will be part of a panel for a public forum regarding new driver's licensing laws on Saturday, August 25 at 3:00 p.m. at KDNA Radio, Granger • Chief Rizzi will be the guest speaker at the Central Washington. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce meet and greet on Wednesday, August 29 at 5:30 p.m., Howard Johnson Hotel, 9 N. 9th St. • BBQ at The Range — September 8 noon -3:00 p.m. — The Range, 1701 Garretson Ln. • Hogs and Dogs — September 15 11:00 a.m. — 2:00 p.m. — Owens Cycle, 1707 N. 1st St. • A free child passenger safety seat education/safety check will be held on September 11 — 3:00 p.m.- 7:00 p.m. at Shopko, 5801 Summitview Ave. • The Central Washington State Fair begins September 21. In addition to officers patrolling the fairgrounds, YPD will have an educational booth for the community to get information and ask questions. We invite council members to attend any police events. If you would like additional information about upcoming events, please contact my assistant, Terri Croft, at 575-6178. Upcoming events can also be found on the Yakima Police Department Facebook page. Dominic Rizzi, Chief of Police City of Yakima PoliceD. �� Dominic Rizzi Jr, Chief of Police 200S.3 d Street Yakima, Washington 98901 Telephone (509) 575-6200 Fax (509) 575-6007 afflff MWI-M, August 15, 2018 To: Public Safety Committee From: Lieutenant Chad Stephens Patrol Watch Commander Subject: Parking Problems Over the last few weeks the police department has received multiple complaints about vehicles parked along 181h St from Yakima Ave to Riverside St. The vehicles parking along the street are not associated with Sgt. Hubbard Park, but instead are people living in them. This includes motor homes, camp trailers and passenger vehicles. The result is a congested road shoulder and sanitary issues as debris seems to pile up in accordance with people living out of their vehicles. After reviewing the parking ordinance, it has become clear that this area does not fit under 9.50. 100 Truck parking in residence districts restricted, because this area is zoned [Small Convenience Center.] Additionally, some of these vehicles are smaller than 20 feet so the ordinance does not apply at all. Some of the complaints we have received state that this is unsightly for those community members using Sgt. Hubbard Park, while others complain about the left over garbage. Prohibiting parking along 18th St from Yakima Ave south to Riverside St, along Riverside Street to Chalmers, then South on Chalmers to Beech St would help with this issue, and give law enforcement the ability to take action. Additionally, prohibiting parking on Chalmers north of Riverside St to Chestnut Ave and then along Chestnut Ave to 16th St would help to eliminate some already used areas nearby that people could move to. While some of these vehicles leave during the day some remain, most if not all will leave garbage behind. I also have received unconfirmed information that that RV's have on occasion dumped sewage along the roadway. The area highlighted in red is the proposed No Parking Area. Another area of the community for which we are frequent parking complaints is on West Chestnut Ave, between 19th Ave and Stanley Blvd. This area currently allows parking along the North Side of Chestnut Ave. We have had multiple complaints about people congregating in the area. Homeowners complain of garbage and loud music at all hours of the day and night. When people get into their vehicles and hang out, there is very little in the way of enforcement that officers can do because parking is legal. Vehicles parked here also cause a significant narrowing of the roadway making two-way traffic possible, but very precarious. Restricting parking hours to "No Parking" between Spm and 5am between Stanley Blvd and 19th Ave on West Chestnut Ave would help to reduce these issues. The area highlighted in red is the proposed No Parking Area. Lieutenant Chad Stephens CITY OF YAKIMA LEGAL DEPAR 200 South Thud Stree�Ygdm., Washington 98901 (509)5'75 6030 Fax (-"M56160 ,0071-M-1 TV 1 August 20, 2018 TO: Dulce Gutierrez, Public Safety Committee Chair Kay Funk, Public Safety Committee Holly Cousins, Public Safety Committee FROM: Cynthia Martinez, Senior Assistant City Attorney SUBJECT: Domestic Violence Last public safety committee meeting I committed to addressing the numbers and painting a picture to what a strong City of Yakima approach to Domestic Violence would resemble. The Domestic Violence Prosecution numbers: 2017 Total charged 979; 31 % of caseload Guilty - 386 SOC - 186 Warrant Status - 69 Pending - 14 Pending Appeal - 0 Not Guilty - 2 Dismissed — 341 No Charges Filed — 618 2016 Total Charged 824; 26% of caseload Guilty - 379 SOC — 136 Warrant Status — 25 Pending — 3 Pending Appeal — 1 Not Guilty — 2 Dismissed — 278 No Charges Filed — 703 Memorandum to Public Safety Committee August 20, 2018 Page 2 The Coordinated Community Response Team (CCRT) Model: The Duluth Michigan CCRT is considered the best evidence based Model for a comprehensive approach to DV crimes. See attached. Below is a discussion of this model and please note that I am not advocating for additional staff in 2019. Prior to making a formal request I would want to study our current results in more detail to make sure my request would be a fiscally responsible and addressing the appropriate issues, secondly, I am aware the 2019 budget can't support such a request. The measure: After viewing the numbers you may ask yourself, "What should the measure be of a strong CCRT? This is a complex question. Police, advocates and prosecutors are all working to be out of a job (eradicate domestic violence), but realistically, that is not going to happen. The better measure is whether there is a transparent, victim -centered, Coordinated Community Response to Domestic Violence (CCRT). The hallmarks of a strong CCRT is as follows: - A victim of domestic violence feels comfortable reporting an incident. - The incident is investigated thoroughly by the Officer and all evidence is gathered and preserved. - The victim feels supported throughout the legal proceedings and after. - Strong and quick prosecution effort. - Closely monitored probation including treatment. Attached is a diagram of the City of Yakima DV Response which illustrates who would be part of the City CCRT. Each bubble should be trained and utilize their own best practice DV protocol for dealing with Crimes of Domestic Violence. To achieve the goal of strong prosecution the Prosecution Unit needs: We need more prosecutors. We currently have 4 prosecutors handling a caseload of 1,000 case each. In contrast, there are 9 public defenders handling no more than 400 cases each and various private attorneys. Having more prosecutors would allow us to have a DV charging unit and an additional prosecutor. The DV charging prosecutor would initiate DV focused practices such as the Gone On Arrival Project (described below). The second prosecutor would handle a caseload thereby reducing or keeping the caseload the same for prosecutors. Ideally, there would be a third prosecutor to reduce prosecutor caseloads more significantly. Victim Advocate Services. We need an in house advocate to provide support services for victims. I formerly worked for the City of Tacoma, who at that time had three DV advocates in the City Prosecution unit. The County, which does not have the number of DV incidents that we do, has two/three devoted victim/witness employees. I found the DV advocates to be an invaluable help and the prosecutors in my office who Memorandum to Public Safety Committee August 20, 2018 Page 3 worked for the County, also praise the work of the victim/ witness employees. Ideally we would have more outside DV advocate support as well. Many of the successful models have an outside advocate talking to a victim as soon as the investigation is complete. Two Police officers or one investigator and a police officer to find victims and serve DV warrants. Recently, David Soukup, Yakima County Sexual Assault Unit Supervisor provided training to the prosecutors. The training was great, but it was apparent that the felony unit receives more YPD support. I don't point this out as a criticism, I think that is great and the felonies should receive that support; Felonies are more serious crimes. However, the City Prosecutor should also have this support and misdemeanor DV warrants should be served as quickly as possible. Gone On Arrival Project: I learned of this project during my recent training and it is an example of a prosecution best practice. Current scenario: Half of our DV cases are received by referral. They are referrals because the perpetrator flees the scene prior to police arrival. 1 have also learned that these are often the worst offenders. We currently review these referrals within a month to six weeks. Ms. Winfield will often try to reach the victim via phone, but the volume is so high, she can't continue to make calls. If a decision is made to charge, the perpetrator will be seen in court about 2 months after the incident. If he/she fails to appear, it could be months before the warrant is served. From the victim's perspective: The perpetrator punched me in the mouth, I called the police and he took off. The next day he came home like nothing. They enter the honeymoon phase of the DV relationship and then the perpetrator gets a summons to court two month later. This could be a dangerous situation for the victim because the perpetrator may accuse the victim of conspiring to get him charged behind his back. At this point, things are going well and the victim is often not cooperative with prosecution effort. Gone on Arrival project: A police officer and Prosecutor would review referrals immediately, a warrant would be requested and the warrant would be served. Within 48 hours of fleeing, the perpetrator would be in jail. Victim is protected and there is a higher likelihood of cooperation. This would result in more case filings, but quicker relief for the victim. 8/20/2018 What is The Duluth Model? - Domestic Abuse Intervention Programs donlestic; abuse 4 t-rventiOrl prlgr,%rjj, VA Hoov pf Ttip VoWth Model . What is The Duluth Model? Since the early 1980s, Duluth—a small community in northern Minnesota—has been an innovator of ways to hold batterers accountable and keep victims safe. The "Duluth Model" is an ever evolving way of thinking about how a community works together to end domestic violence. * Has taken the blame off the victim and placed the accountability for abuse on the offender. * Has shared policies and procedures for holding offenders accountable and keeping victims safe across all agencies in the criminal and civil justice systems from 911 to the courts. ® Prioritizes the voices and experiences of women who experience battering in the creation of those policies and procedures. Believes that battering is a pattern of actions used to intentionally control or dominate an intimate partner and actively works to change societal conditions that support men's use of tactics of power and control over women. Has ongoing discussions between criminal and civil justice agencies, community members and victims to close gaps and improve the community's response to battering. https://www.theduluthmodel.org/what-is-the-duluth-model/ 1/3 8/20/2018 What is The Duluth Model? - Domestic Abuse Intervention Programs e jobs 202 East Superior Street Duluth, MN 55802 https://www.theduluthmodel.org/what-is-the-duluth-model/ 2/3 8/20/2018 www.endvawnow.org/en/articles/print/id/319/ VJIRTUAL IMOWLEDGE END VIOLENCE AGAINS • leveloping coordinated community responses A coordinated community response involving health, police, judicial and legal services, shelters and protection services, schools and other education institutions, religious or cultural groups, and others is an important strategy to ensure survivors of violence, their children and other dependents receive the comprehensive support they need in a timely and sensitive manner. A coordinated community response is the equivalent of employing a multisectoral approach at the local level. In many instances, central -level agreements are secured first that can then be transferred to local levels. The respective governmental and non-governmental organizations are brought together in a `team of professionals' (including health, police, shelters, social and mental health care workers, etc.), to ensure a shared understanding of the anti -violence legal framework and laws in place, the concept and practical application of a community coordinated response, and the respective roles and procedures that should be followed within the multi -sectoral approach. Coordinated community responses engage key individuals and agencies from different sectors to: • help women and girls access protection, legal assistance and meet other basic health and livelihood needs; • encourage survivors to report incidents of violence by ensuring a gender -sensitive and appropriate response and increasing trust in the police; • promote `zero tolerance' throughout the community; • more closely monitor women's safety and batterer intervention programmes where they exist; and, • increase prosecutions and convictions. (Shepard and Pence, 1999; Morrison, et.al., 2007) "a 111 1111 1 • Safety of the survivors/victims as the core and paramount principle of the model, which should be instilled through sensitization, training, protocols, procedures and so forth, among all key stakeholders and service providers (police, social workers, lawyers, judges, etc). • Inter -institutional negotiations for cooperation - leading to Memoranda of Understanding, protocols and other agreements. In the process of inter -institutional negotiations, it is important to secure support from major decision -makers (including mayors and/or other high-level local authorities) and work with actors that are trusted by the community. • Achieve systematic changes — the purpose of inter -institutional negotiations and interventions under this approach is not only to improve responses for women and girls survivors, but also to achieve lasting changes in the attitudes, norms and practices at the level of the service delivery institutions themselves. The intervention is centered on institutions as a whole, and not just individual representatives, reflecting a systems -based approach. This implies working towards pre-service/institutionalized training; ensuring minimum standards (e.g. for domestic violence or rape -related services); upgrading equipment and infrastructure; continuous quality control http://www.endvawnow.org/en/articles/print/id/319/ 1/3 I 8/20/2018 www.endvawnow.org/en/articles/print/id/319/ mechanisms to monitor the quality of services that women and girl survivors receive; and establishing data collection systems. Multidisciplinary teams that bring together all relevant stakeholders. Exact content (membership) of teams depends on the local context, including any relevant legislation that may guide and establish roles and Community mobilization and primary prevention efforts, including through sustained local campaigns engagin the media and diverse orcianizations and sectors of the population to build zero tolerance and enable an ormover 4 supportive environment for women and girls survivors, and for furthering policy and legal refs and securinl resources, Flexibility and adaptation, and ongoing monitoring: The coordinated community response is intended as a dynamic model that can respond and adapt to needs for improvement and changes in context based on continuous, participatory monitoring involving the key stakeholders and information based on women survivors' experiences. This should include monitoring of perpetrator interventions and efforts to adjust policies and IM41111-411 government. RVITITH M-1 19TROTATIT am, coordinated community response, but it is important to invest in ensuring that their values and beliefs are align with women's human rights in order to ensure women's access to justice. i ® In addition to strong communication channels, formal assessments and documentation of findings are critical to i IIII!!1 111 will 11111 The Duluth Model: Social Change to End Violence against Women (Domestic Abuse Intervention Programs). Available in English. http://www.endvawnow.org/en/articles/print/id/319/ 2/3 8/20/2018 www.endvawnow.org/en/articies/print/id/319/ 'i TIM 711TAT7_7 ffm "(; T, 4' r*=1 I i -Aww=m7perl Resource Center on Domestic Viole nce, 2003). Available in English. Models of Community Coordination in Partner Violence Cases: A Multi -Side Comparative Analysis, Final Report (Word en/Nationa I Criminal Justice Reference Service, 2001). Available in English. '17,5—m —es f Fc-- I! i o I e n c e a n cl _01-(I fi��T,',Tisconsiin—To—aTiTFo-n--X-g-a-Fn-s-f -Sexual ASsaull-a-n-a-TYTo- Wisconsin Coalition Against Domestic Violence, 2009). Available in English. Manual Bridging Gaps ® from Good Intention to Good Cooperation (Women against Violence Europe, 2006). Available in English. Sexual Violence, United States). Available in English. http://www.endvawnow.org/en/articies/print/id/319/ 3/3 City of Yakima D • . • • • im 'dw ITION DESCRIPTION Job Classification: Program Coordinator (Law) Position Title: Victim Advocate Salary Range: AFSCME 17 End Date: (If yes above, insert date) Prepared By: Kevin McClure Reports To City Prosecutor Position (Title): Department: City Attorney's Office Division: DVPC FTE: .75 M -101111111W11 ](404W SECTION 2. POSITION SUMMARY — Please summarize the main purpose of the position in 3-5 sentences. Acts as a liaison between victims, primarily those of domestic violence, and the prosecutor. Provide victims with information regarding the court process, safety planning, and scheduling and attending interviews; assists victims in court. Provides victim advocacy services on non-domestic violence city cases, as needed. SECTION 3. SUPERVISORY RESPONSIBILITES - Please choose level of supervisor below. No Supervisory I (Type here) Updated 9/2015 Position Description Template List Essential Job Functions & Responsibilities (no more than 5-8 functions) — Functions should be directly related to the reason that the job exists. All percentages should be at least 5% for the task/duty to bean essential function of the position. Any function less than 5% can be listed % of Time as an "Other Duty." 30% Evaluate and create plans for new domestic violence cases. Review the history of violence Updated 9/2015 Position Description Template SECTION 5. Q#ALIFICATT,,#-AIS To perform this job successfully, an individual must be able to perform each essential function satisfactorily. The requirements listed below are representative of the knowledge, skill, and/or ability One (1) year ofrelated experience invictim advocacy work, counseling involving domestic violence victims. Updated 9/2015 List Essential Job Functions & Responsibilities (no more than 5-8 functions) — Functions should be directly related to the reason that the job exists. All percentages should be at least 5% for the task/duty to be an essential function of the position. Any function less than 5% can be listed case, and assess the level of danger for victims. Develop a safety plan, considering victim's immediate needs, and identify their options. Provide victims with referrals for additional resources and assist victims with finding shelter. Speak with attorneys about victim concerns, and explain victim's rights and protections. Manage cases throughout the court process. Communicate with victims concerning hearing updates, No Contact Order hearings, victim's desire for contact, and sentencing information. Explain the criminal justice process, how to request restitution for medical bills or damaged property, and the way for victim to properly respond to violations of a No Contact Order/Protection 30% Order. Alert attorneys concerning Brady information revealed to advocate. Intervene with landlord or employer on behalf of victim; assist victim to obtain access to medical visits and treatments. Refer victims to community agencies to assist with housing, counseling, and immigration assistance. May need to do home visits to assist victim who is housebound and can't adequately communicate via phone or gain access to courts. Set up and attend interviews including defense interviews and prosecutor requested interviews. 15% Assist victims during the interview process by explaining their rights, intervene if the victim becomes distraught, and ensure the victim feels safe during the interview. Attend Court hearings including regular dockets, special sets, protection orders, and trials. Interpret a variety of court instructions for victim furnished in written, oral, or diagram form. Persuade victims to go to the trial and to testify truthfully about incident. Prepare victims for court 15% testimony by counseling reluctant and/or recanting victims and explaining the prosecuting attorney's position on trial attendance and possible effects/consequences of victim's choices, including the fact that a material witness warrant could be issued if a victim fails to appear for trial after being served with a subpoena, Read victim impact statements at sentencing as requested; address emotional aftermath of trial, verdict and sentencing. Provide assistance as needed for victims who call or stop by the office with concerns or questions. Seek assistance from police detectives to take custody of evidence or take photos of injuries. Be 10% prepared to offer information about housing, shelters or other community resources to victims who call or drop by the office. Help find transportation for victims who call and are unable to secure a ride to court or to an interview. 100% List Other Duties as Assigned Below Attend and actively participate in meetings (i.e. DV task force). Provide training, outreach and domestic violence education to hospitals, schools and community organizations. Plan training, speak effectively to individuals, groups and/or organizations, and answer questions. Perform related duties and responsibilities as assigned. SECTION 5. Q#ALIFICATT,,#-AIS To perform this job successfully, an individual must be able to perform each essential function satisfactorily. The requirements listed below are representative of the knowledge, skill, and/or ability One (1) year ofrelated experience invictim advocacy work, counseling involving domestic violence victims. Updated 9/2015 Education and Experience: Education: Equivalent to a Bachelor's Degree in social work, psychology, counseling or a related field. Equivalent combinations of education and experience may be considered. Required Licenses and/or Certificates: Possession of: Appropriate valid driver's license. Computer Skills (list any computer skills that are required upon hire to perform the job functions): Intermediate skills in Microsoft Word, Excel, Outlook, PowerPoint. Background Checks: ❑x Pre-employment reference checks El Basic criminal background check OR ❑x WSP background check El Credit check ❑x Driving abstract ❑Medical Evaluation ❑ Drug Testing ❑Other: Knowledge: • Laws and regulations related to victim/witness rights and the criminal justice system • Procedures of district court • Principles and practice of interviewing and counseling • Available community resources and programs • Crisis intervention methods • Disclosure rules of information favorable to a defendant • Modern office procedures, methods and computer equipment • Use of personal computers and basic software Abilities: • Conduct interviews to accurately assess victim's needs • Provide initial evaluation and counseling services to crime victims • Interpret and apply applicable policies, procedures, laws and regulations • Assess people and situations accurately and adopt effective courses of action • Prepare reports, maintain detailed records and make presentations • Communicate clearly, both orally and in writing • Establish and maintain effective working relationships with those contacted in the course of work • Get to and from the court house and attend court on a daily basis • Operate a personal computer and appropriate software • Work in a manner consistent with the City of Vancouver's Operating Principles • Work and act as a team player in all interactions with other City employees • Provide a high level of customer service at all times • Project and maintain a positive image with those contacted in the course of work • Develop and maintain collaborative and respectful working relationships with team members and others • Consistently provide quality service Updated 9/2015 Position Description Template 0 Maintain regular and dependable attendance SECTION 6. INTERACTIONS AND COMMUNICATIONS—Nhatinteraotions/communicationaene essential to performing thisposition? Must possess ability to work both independently and as a cooperative team member. Establish and maintain collaborative relationships with community partners. Maintain contact with staff of governmental agencies, law enforcement, nonprofit organizations, and courts to provide services for victims, or exchange information. Decisions made follow established precedents and procedures with minimal deviation. Options to choose from are limited and/or defined. Work product is reviewed. oil low! 111IM-11 11.1.1001 -PI 0 0 OITA 61110144:4611 1 a a - . Him SECTION 9. REVIEW OF WORK SECTION 10. PHYSICAL DEMANDS Reasonable accommodations may be made to enable qualified individuals with disabilities to perform essential functions Check the box that best describes the overall amount mfphysical effort typically required bVthis job. Standard - Normally seated, standing or walking at will; normal physical ability to do some bending and light carrying. - Confined toimmediate work area; can only leave work station during assigned breaks. OR Moderate amount of walking, recurring bending, crouching, stooping, stretching, reaching or similar activities. Ex@rbve- Extensive walking, recurring bending, crouching, etonping, etretohing, reaching or similar activities; recurring lifting oflight ormoderately heavy items. Strenuous - Considerable and rapid physical exertion or demands on the body such as frequent climbing of tall ladders, continuous lifting of heavy objects, crouching or crawling in restricted areas; exertion | | requires highly intense muscular action leading to substantial muscular exhaustion. Please identify each appropriate physical activity required in the performance of this job and indicate the relative code (see below) for each activity. Check "N/A" column if this position is not required to perform the respective activity. PHYSICAL DEMANDS OF THE JOB Job: Hours per day: Date of Analysis: (Type here) (Type here) (Type here) Date of Supervisor Review: (Type here) Shift Duration (select one) Seldom Occasional Frequent Constant N/A Comments 8 hours 0-1 hr 1-3 hrs 3-6 hrs 6-8 hrs Not Heavy lifting/carrying/lowering more 1:1 z than 100 lbs Heavy lifting/carrying/lowering 76 — El El El El Z 100 lbs Updated 9/2015 PHYSICAL DEMANDS OF THE JOB Job: (Type here) Hours per day: (Type here) Date of Analysis: (Type here) Date of Supervisor Review: (Type here) Shift Duration (select one) Seldom Occasional Frequent ` Constant N/A Comments 8 hours 9 hours 10 hours 0-1 hr 0-1 hr 0-1.5 hrs 1-3 hrs 1-3.5 hrs 1.5-4 hrs 3-6 hrs 3.5-7 hrs 4-7.5 hrs 6-8 hrs 7-9 hrs 7.5-10 hrs Not Applic able Moderate lifting/carrying/lowering 51 — 75 lbs ❑ El El Moderate lifting/carrying/lowering 21 — lbs ❑ ❑ El El Light lifting/carrying/lowering 11 — 20 lbs 0 ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ Light lifting/carrying/lowering =10 lbs ❑ El El El Pulling/pushing ❑ ❑ ❑ Reaching/Working Overhead ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ Use of fingers ❑ ❑ 0 ❑ ❑ Both hands required ❑ ❑X El ❑ Handling/grasping ❑ El FZ ❑ ❑ Climbing: Ladder/stairs/uneven round ❑ ❑ El El 0 Walking/Standing ❑ x ❑ ❑ ❑ Sitting ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ Stooping/crouching Q El ❑ ❑ ❑ Kneeling/Crawling ❑ ❑ ❑ Repeated Bending ❑X ❑ ❑ Repetitive motions repeated 3 second eve s E] ❑ El ❑ Twisting, Z ❑ ❑ Operatingof motorized equipment ❑ 1:1 El El ❑ Other Laying on side/stomach El❑ Other — work in tight spaces ❑ ❑ ❑ 1:1 ❑ Updated 9/2015 Position Description Template CITY OF FEDERAL WAY CLASS TITLE: DOMESTIC VIOLENCE CLASS CODE: LEGAL ADVOCATE MR DEPARTMENT: Law DIVISION: Prosecution EEO: Paraprofessional (5) FLA STATUS: Non-exempt BASIC FUNCTION: Under the direction of the City Attorney or designee, assist in the prosecution of persons charged with domestic violence -related crimes; function as liaison between victims and the criminal justice system, including police and the courts; locate and maintain contact with victims and witnesses; educate victims on court procedures; provide referrals to social service agencies. ESSENTIAL JOB FUNCTIONS: Conduct interviews to assess victim safety, risk factors, and needs and refer victims to appropriate community resources for crisis intervention, safety planning, and services. Explain legal processes to victim, including roles of probation, parole, corrections, treatment providers, law enforcement and others; prepare victim for court hearings and attend court as necessary to support victim and advocate on victim's behalf. Advise victims of court date(s); assess and encourage victim's willingness to assist with prosecution. Contact victims and witnesses for full information and make arrangements for their attendance at court hearings. Assist in the preparation of misdemeanor cases management; obtaining pre-trial and pre -sentence orders, etc.; and case presentation support. for prosecution in municipal court; including case information including police reports, photos, court Appear and assist prosecution at trials and other hearings. Communicate with other agencies and jurisdictions such as police, jail, treatment agencies and other departmental personnel. Maintain cooperative and problem -solving attitude in dealing with public, city departments and other agencies. Attend meetings related to domestic violence education and other related matters. Assist in preparation, organization and maintenance of related records and reports such as lists, victim files, narratives and resource information; submit to appropriate personnel and department as required. Perform confidential secretarial and administrative work of a varied nature including receiving and screening telephone calls; walk-in requests; establish and maintain files, records, and other information sources needed to facilitate, support and document office or department activities. Utilize word processing and spreadsheet functions to tabulate and sort data, generate reports, newsletters, worksheets, schedules, letters, memos, requisitions and other items of similar complexity. Perform related work and special projects as assigned and exercise appropriate discretion and use good judgment in the performance of the duties. r- Domestic Violence Legal Advocate KNOWLEDGE AND ABILITIES: Page 2 KNOWLEDGE OF: • Organization, function and activities of a municipal government, legal department and criminal justice system. • Basic municipal criminal codes, and other applicable laws, codes, regulations, policies, and procedures. • Local community resources. • Field of domestic violence. • Domestic violence problem -solving techniques and processes. • Processing requirements and procedures for public documents. • Modern office practices, procedures and equipment, including a personal computer. • Correct English usage, grammar, spelling, punctuation, and vocabulary. • Oral and written communication skills. • Interpersonal skills using tact, patience and courtesy. ABILITY TO: • Effectively conduct directed interviews and obtain relevant information from persons in crisis. • Learn to explain laws, codes, regulations, policies and procedures. • Establish and maintain effective and cooperative working relationships with coworkers and other agency staff and professionals. • Coordinate varied demands and cope with stress and disturbing situations. • Set priorities and plan and organize work. • Meet schedules and time lines. • Communicate effectively, both verbally and in writing. • Give clear, effective, and decisive oral presentations in varied settings, including courtroom. • Operate computer terminal and word processing software used by the City. • Successfully perform the duties of this position. • Physical ability to perform the essential job functions. • Demonstrated ability to positively and effectively interact with diverse individuals to accomplish a common goal. • Consistently use good judgment and discretion. ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS/PHYSICAL EFFORT: Work is performed primarily in an office environment. May be exposed to noise from basic office equipment operation. Some lifting of light objects (less than 25 lbs.) may be required. Also requires some travel from location to location for the purpose of interviewing victims and witnesses and attending court hearings. Fieldwork may include, but is not limited to, attending meetings. May be some exposure to individuals who may be distraught, violent or abusive. Domestic Violence Legal Advocate Page 3 EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE: Any combination equivalent to: Graduation from high school with 2 years experience in social services, human services, criminal justice or related field, knowledge of the legal system/court room procedures, and specialized knowledge in the area of advocacy for domestic violence or crisis/abuse treatment. LICENSES AND OTHER REQUIREMENTS: Washington State Driver's License. `. JOB AoIA- JOB _ ��ctiA0\8/itness Advocate/Case CoxEL E -PLAN SGAD DEPARTMENlF:- Legal CS:N FLSA:N EE04CODE:PR Coordinates and conducts initial assessment interviews with victims and witnesses of domestic violence and other cases referred bvthe Bellingham Police Department. Documents the reaction of the victim and the trauma and impact associated with the crime; prepares recommendation tOaid prosecutors in determining the viability ofprosecution; and familiarizes victims and witnesses with the legal p[8CeSS in an effort to clarify options and minimize anxiety. Provides victims with iDfO[OOotinn about appropriate CODlrDuDib/ resources for counseling, health and protective services, and Crime Victim's Compensation. Responsible for follow-up Orcontinual contact with victims and vvitneSS8S as needed. Works closely with Bellingham P0|iC8 Dep8rtnn8nt, Prosecutor's C]fDSe, K8UDiCip3| COurt, and private o[non-profit services 'related to domestic violence. Provides support for prosecutions iOMunicipal Court. Screens and trains volunteer advocates tUaccompany victims tOcourt. Reports to the City Attorney. Performs works independently under the guidance of state law and City and department policies, procedures, rules and regulations. Provides assistance to victims of domestic violence with priority given to the safety of 2. Makes or arranges direct contact with victims and witnesses of domestic violence and other crimes to provide support, referral, and comprehensive information regarding victim's rights, available options, community resources and the legal system. Maintains ongoing C0Dt8Ct with victims and witnesses in order to provide information. Assists in making 8r[8DAe[D8nts for their attendance Gtcourt hearings, and assists |intheir preparation as witnesses. Explains process Ofcriminal prosecution t8victims. Attends court 8Snecessary. 3. Conducts victim assessment interviews to collect and analyze the information involving the immediate crime and any prior history ofdomestic violence. Effectively documents observations and recommendations for further reference, preparing and maintaining intake forms and activity logs. Makes recommendations that are reviewed and utilized by prosecutors when assessing the ability of victims and witnesses to assist in the prosecution. 4` Prepares correspondence and/or reports, tracks cases and uses 8computer database k) obtain, collect and evaluate iDfOrDGbOD. Victim Witness Advocate/Case Coordinator Page 3 — Ability to respond effectively in crisis and emergency situations and to exert a calming influence on, reassure and advise individuals in crisis. — Knowledge of and ability to use personal computers with word processing, spreadsheet and data base software, and standard office equipment. Keyboard approximately 40 wpm with accuracy. Compose a variety of correspondence using standard business English and format. — Ability to apply independent judgment and carry work through to completion with minimal supervision and to work cooperatively as a member of a team. — Willingness and ability to maintain confidentiality. — Ability to instruct and direct other employees and volunteers in methods or procedures needed to carry out their jobs. — Ability and willingness to demonstrate the Public Service Competencies of Service Orientation, Results Orientation, and Teamwork and Cooperation. WORKING ENVIRONMENT: Work is performed in office and courtroom settings in potentially volatile situations with clients who have undergone physical and emotional trauma. Potential exposure to verbal abuse and graphically explicit language about abuse. EXPERIENCE AND TRAINING REQUIREMENTS: — Requires a BA/BS in social services or closely related field, one (1) year of experience in Social Work or related field providing direct services to victims of domestic violence, and two (2) years experience with computers and legal office procedures, OR any combination of education, training and experience that provides the knowledge, skills and abilities necessary to perform the essential functions of the job. PREPARED BY: REVISED BY: Dawn Sturwold 1/98 Holt Consulting 7/00 Lorna Klemanski 12/00 LEVictimWitnessAdvctCaseCoord.jd.doc REVIEWED BY: Joan Hoisington City Attorney Proposals for Amendment to City of Yakima's Shopping Cart Ordinance Current Shopping Cart Ordiance Cart Identification (using RCW 9a.45.270) • Carts Identification of owner on cart with telephone number. • notifies public of procedure for authorized removal from premises • Notifies public that unauthorized removal/possession of cart is unlawful Shopping cart outside of Premises for 96 hours after notice (excluding sat/sun) • Public property owned or under control of city • Right of way within the city. • Private Property with owner consenting to removal May be impounded without notice when: • Hazardous location • Lack of Identification • Evidence of a crime or as part of any other criminal investigation. Current Fee Schedule • 25$ per cart o Owners with installed locking devices exempt if device disabled by unauthorized person. • City may sell or dispose of carts if not reclaimed within 7 days from notification. First Proposal — Renton Model (Emphasis on rapid response to carts off premises) Modified Retrieval and Impoundment • City may immediately impound any lost, stolen or abandoned shopping cart within the city, or any cart which the required identification sign is not affixed. o Eliminating the 96 hour waiting period. o Allows Impounding of carts with signage/notification removed. • Define Security measures appropriate for Fine deferment 1. Electronically -activated self -braking wheels; 2. Poles mounted to shopping carts, which prevent their removal from the interior of the retail establishment 3. Utilization of a cart patrol and retrieval company; 4. Dedicated security personnel; and 5. Other measures deemed appropriate and effective by the Administrator Modified Fine Schedule • $100 fine per cart • Fine deferment for 3 carts each month when using satisfactory security measures and consent to city retrieval without notice. o If 4 or more shopping carts from the same owner are impounded within a calendar month, no fines are deferred o Incentivizes permitting the city to expedite cart removal process. Multi Family Dwelling Provision • Provide duty and process for owners/managers of Multi Family Dwellings to prevent buildup of carts on property. Second Proposal — Medford Model (Emphasis on Owner retrieval) Modified Retrieval and Impoundment • Owners have seven days to retrieve cart from location of abandonment after notice. o After seven days enforcement may take custody of cart. • 30 days after notice, city owns the carts. o City May sell or dispose of carts Modified Fine Schedule • $50 to get cart back from Code enforcement. Public Reporting • Cart owners shall establish a telephone number for the purpose of reporting abandoned carts o More than one owner may use the same number to share expenses. o If cart location has been reported to city, city will call the appropriate number. Third Proposal — Modified Yakima Model Impoundment Process • Allow impounding of carts with signage removed. Fine Deferment • Offer fine deferment for first 3 carts monthly with letter of consent to retrieve carts without 96 hour notice. Fine Schedule • Increase fine to $50 F"6741 1' J / ' ' f 0 Phone J 9) 575-6005 Memorandum August 13, 2018 To Public Safety Committee and City Manager, Cliff Moore From: Ana Cortez, Assistant City Manager Scott Schafer, Director of Public Works Brett Sheffield, PE, Chief Engineer Re'.: Safe Routes to School Report i - -�11 111111111111 l�'1111111111111111 1,111111111 ;!'' 111111 111111 . .11111111111 • - • • Adams[ Washington School Sidewalks — 2018. Installed sidewalk, ADA - compliant sidewalk ramps and crosswalks at various locations around the schools; relocated the school flashers to cover a larger area. The total project cost is estimated at $380,000; Safe Routes to Schools grant was $357,000. • West Valley Middle School Vicinity Improvements — 2016. Installed sidewalk on the south side of Zier Road from 72nd Avenue to 75th Avenue, and installed a traffic signal at the intersection of 72nd Avenue and Mead Avenue. The total project cost was $604,393.20; Safe Routes to Schools grant was $544,000. Other completed projects sidewalk/ramps ..: Elementary • • • Lincoln Avenue Corridor Safety — 2016. Installed 5 -foot wide sidewalk and ADA -compliant sidewalk ramps on the north side of Lincoln Avenue between 24th Avenue and 32nd Avenue. The total project cost was $482,076.10. The Highway Safety Improvement Project (HSIP) grant was for $440,000. • Citywide Safety Improvements — 2014. This project installed 50 ADA - compliant sidewalk ramps on 16th Avenue between Nob Hill Boulevard and Lincoln Avenue. The total project cost was $451,461.50; HSIP grant was for $400,000. Garfield Elementary Safety Improvements (Summer 2019). This project will install sidewalk on the east side of Campbell Lane from Jerome Avenue to Willow Street and install sidewalk on the west side of 6th Avenue from Jerome Avenue to Willow Street, as well as installing ADA -compliant ramps and crosswalks at other various locations. The amount of the Safe Routes to Schools grant is $180,000. • McClure Elementary School Vicinity Safety Improvements (Summer 2020). This project will install sidewalk on Lila Avenue between 24th Avenue and Karr Administration 575-6005 Engineering 575-6111 - Equipment Renta] 575-6005 ®harks & Recreation 575-6020 e Refuse 575-6005 Street 575-6005 Traffic 575-6005 6 Transit 575-6005 ® Wastewater/Stormwater 575-6077 - NVaterltrrigation 575-6154 Avenue, install sidewalk on the south side of Prasch Avenue from 22nd Avenue to 20th Avenue, fill in missing sections of sidewalk at various locations on Viola Avenue between 24th Avenue and 20th Avenue, install ADA -compliant sidewalk curb ramps and crosswalks at various location near the school and install a Rapid Rectangular Flashing Beacon at the school crossing located at 24th Avenue and Viola Avenue. Right -of way acquisition is required. The Safe Routes to School Grant amount is $270,000. r - - . . . • . - • • . Schools:Elementary Complete Streets Project (Spring 2019). This project will install sidewalk on the south side of Swan Avenue from McGuiness Park to Campbell Lane (tie into sidewalk installed as part of Garfield SRTS project); install sidewalk on Race Street between 8th Street and Naches Avenue (tie into sidewalk installed as part of Adams/Washington SRTS project); install sidewalk on the south side of Prasch Avenue from 20' Avenue to 16th Avenue (tie into sidewalk installed as part of the McClure Elementary SRTS project); install sidewalk on the south side of Viola from 10th Avenue to 4th Avenue (adjacent to Hoover Elementary); install sidewalk on the west side of Powerhouse Road from Robertson Elementary to Englewood Avenue. The project is estimated to cost $500,000. The Transportation Improvement Board grant is $500,000. McKinley Elementary School Vicinity Safety Improvements. This project would install a High intensity Activated cross WalK (HAWK) pedestrian crossing signal at the intersection of Tieton Drive and 13' Avenue; replacement of damaged sections of sidewalk on MacLaren Street, 12th Avenue and 13th Avenue; installation of ADA ramps and crosswalks at various intersections; and the installation of a bike rack at the school. The estimated cost of the project is $500,000; Safe Routes to Schools grant application is for $480,000. 88th Avenue Sidewalk (Apple Valley Elementary School) project. This project would install curb, gutter and sidewalk on the east side of 88th Avenue between Tieton Drive and Summitview Avenue; install ADA ramps at various intersections; install raised crosswalks across 88th Avenue north of Chestnut Avenue and north of Barge Street; and install a bike rack at the school. The estimated cost of this project is $800,000; Safe Routes to Schools grant application is for $500,000. As this project is on the approved TBD list, TBD funds used as a match will increase the City's success with the grant application. • Barge -Lincoln Elementary — Approximately $350,000 (Apply for in 2020) • Gilbert Elementary — Approximately $400,000 (Apply for in 2020) • Hoover Elementary — Approximately 500,000 (Apply for in 2020) • Robertson Elementary — Approximately $350,000 (Apply for in 2022) • Whitney Elementary — Approximately $350,000 (Apply for in 2022) • Roosevelt Elementary — Approximately $350,000 (Apply for in 2022) 2018 Pedestrian and Bicycle and Safe in to Routes to School Application for Funding W/JF De"Ament of TronapoAation Part 1: GeneralInformation Funding Program: Select one. ❑ Pedestrian & Bicycle Program — Infrastructure project (may include preliminary engineering) ❑ Pedestrian & Bicycle Program — Design -only project ❑x Safe Routes to School Program Organization's name: Contact info. for questions about the project(s) in this application • Contact person: Brett Sheffield, PE • Title: Chief Engineer • Phone: 509-576-6797 . Email: brett.sheffield@yakimawa.gov State Legislative District: 14 Part 2: Project Project Title: McKinley Elementary School Vicinity Safety Improvements Overall project limits: Beginning project limit: Maclaren Street and 16th Ave. Ending project limit: Tieton Dr. and 13th Ave. Is this project on a State Route? ❑x No ❑ Yes: Route # Milepost(s) Project Description: This project would install a High intensity Activated cross Wall< (HAWK) pedestrian crossing signal, replace dilapidated sidewalk, install ADA compliant sidewalk curb ramps, install crosswalks and install a bike rack at McKinley Elementary School. Detailed Project Description: List the improvements/countermeasures/methods and location 1. Install a HAWK pedestrian crossing signal a. Intersection of Tieton Drive and 131h Avenue 2. Replace dilapidated sidewalk (5 feet wide) a. Both sides of Maclaren Street between 13th Avenue and 16th Avenue b. South side of Maclaren Street between 12th Avenue and 13th Avenue c. East side of 13th Avenue between Maclaren Street and St. Helen's Street d. Both sides of 12th Avenue between Maclaren Street and St. Helen's Street 3. Install ADA compliant sidewalk curb ramps a. Intersection of 12th Avenue and Maclaren Street b. Intersection of 13th Avenue and Maclaren Street c. Intersection of 141h Avenue and Maclaren Street d. Intersection of 15th Avenue and Maclaren Street e. Intersection of 121h Avenue and St. Helen's Street f. Intersection of 13th Avenue and St. Helen's Street 4. Install crosswalks a. Across Maclaren Street east side of 16th Avenue b. Across 151h Avenue on both sides of Maclaren Street c. All four crossing movements at the intersection of Maclaren Street and 141h Avenue d. All four crossing movements at the intersection of Maclaren Street and 13th Avenue e. Across Maclaren Street west side of 12th Avenue 5. Install bike rack a. In the vicinity of McKinley Elementary. Use the format below. 2018 Pedestrian and Bicycle and Safe Routes to School Application for Funding Page 1 of 4 Project Schedule (Estimated milestones): Project added to the Statewide Transportation Improvement Program STIP 8/2019 Project agreement signed 8/2019 Begin PE PE phase authorized by funding agency) 10/2019 Community outreach/engagement 2/2020 Environmental documents approved 2/2020 Right-of-way completed certification N/A Contract advertised 4/2020 Contract awarded 6/2020 Local transportation safety program (education/encouragement) begin for Safe Routes to School Program projects only) 3/2020 Local transportation safety program (education/encouragement) complete for Safe Routes to School Program projects only) 5/2020 Construction complete 9/2020 Project Cost and Funding Request: Phase Total cost Match Amount requested Local transportation safety program - —education/encouragement SRTS projects only) $ 10,000 $ 10,000 $ Engineering PE $ 40,000 $ $ 40,000 —Preliminary -of -Way RW $ $ $ —Right Construction includes construction administration CN $ 460,000 $ $ 460,000 Total $ 510,000 $ 10,000 $ 500,000 Matching funds: City general funds. Part 3: Background Project Focus: Check all that apply 0 Pedestrian mobility 0 Bicyclist mobility 0 Community health ❑ Economic development ❑ Safety at crash location ❑ Proactive/systematic safety — If this box is checked please indicate the process used to prioritize the proactive/systematic safety project (example — local roads safety planning process): In the summer of 2017, the City of Yakima hired two students from the City Council Mentorship Program to collect sidewalk data around Yakima -area schools. Around McKinley Elementary, several deficiencies were noted including: deteriorated surface (16 locations); uneven panels (18); no, or damaged ADA ramp (22); and, Tree Damage (8). Need/purpose: The purpose of this project is to improve the pedestrian crossing at the intersection of 131h Avenue and Tieton Drive and improve the walking surfaces along MacLaren Street, 121h Avenue and 131h Avenue. McKinley Elementary has an agreement with the Trinity Baptist Church at the northeast corner of 13th Avenue and Tieton Drive to allow use of the church parking lot for dropping off and picking up children. Although crossing guards are stationed at this location during the drop off and pick up times, installing a HAWK pedestrian crossing at this location would increase the safety. The existing sidewalk on MacLaren Street, 12th Avenue and 13th Avenue is old and has section that are in poor shape. Although 5 feet in width, the sidewalk has settled and grass has grown over the sidewalk in many areas, resulting in a useable width of approximately 4.5 feet. There are no sidewalk curb ramps at the street intersections. Replacing the dilapidated sidewalk and installing sidewalk curb ramps at the street intersections will greatly increase the usability of the sidewalk, especially for persons with disabilities. 2018 Pedestrian and Bicycle and Safe Routes to School Application for Funding Page 2 of 4 Community engagement: We met with school officials after observing the afternoon dismissal of the students to discuss the recommendations we are making for the grant application. They were in favor of them. Adopted plan: The project is included in the City's Six -Year Transportation Improvement Program that was adopted by City Council on June 20, 2018 For fatal and/or serious injury bicyclist/pedestrian collisions from 2012-2016 at the project locationsprovide the: Location Crash report number Contributing circumstances 1. 2. Etc. How many evident injury, possible injury, unknown injury or no injury crashes occurred between 2012-2016 at the project location(s)? Three evident injury crashes, one involving a cyclist and two involving pedestrians. How many other bike/pedestrian collisions within 1 mile of the project may be addressed by the project? Explain: Speeds: At the proposed project location(s) what is the: Posted travel speed (mph): Maclaren, 25 mph; 161h Avenue, 30 mph; Tieton Drive, 30 mph. Operating speed (85th percentile) (mph): Maclaren, 28 mph; 16th Avenue, 37 mph; Tieton Drive, 35 mph. Desired speed (the target speed) (mph): Maclaren, 25 mph; 16th Avenue, 30 mph; Tieton Drive, 30 mph. At the proposed project location(s) what is the vehicle volume (average daily traffic -ADT): 16th Avenue, 19,895; Tieton Drive, 11,520. What are the crossing accommodations at the proposed project location(s) (indicate number and type) None 10 Marked crosswalks 5 Marked crosswalk plus traffic calming Crossing guard or student safety patrol 2 Stop sign, traffic signal, flashing beacons 9 Greenhouse gas emissions policy Does the local jurisdiction have an adopted greenhouse gas emissions policy (see RCW 70.235.070 for details about this consideration)? Yes X No Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA): About 25% complete. The City of Yakima has developed a draft ADA Transition Plan, which is being reviewed by the City's Bicycle and Pedestrian Committee. The committee consists of seven community volunteers who are concerned with the bicycle and pedestrian facilities in the city. Complete Streets Ordinance: Does the local jurisdiction have an adopted complete streets ordinance? Yes X No Acle Friendly Ranking: Does the local jurisdiction have a Bicycle Friendly Ranking? Yes No X Applied inmost recent cycle, awaiting results Part 4: Additional Questions for Pedestrian and BicycleProgram r j (Complete this section, only if applying for Pedestrian and Bicyclist Program funding.) Numbers of bicyclists and pedestrians at project location: Number of people biking Number of people walking Date and method of biking and walking data collection: 2018 Pedestrian and Bicycle and Safe Routes to School Application for Funding Page 3 of 4 Equity information What percent of the population in the project location census block group are: Living below the poverty line? Racial/ethnic minorities Above 65 years old Have disabilities See the WSDOT Data Portal for this information. (Complete this section, only if applying for Safe Routes to School Program funding.) Children Served School(s) Name: McKinley Elementary Number of children that live within one mile of the school(s) that would be served by the project 370 Number of children that get to the school(s) by: Walking 70 Biking 0 School Bus 35 Family Vehicle 111 Other 8 Date and method of data collection: Safe Routes to School Students Arrival and Tally Sheet surveys were taken on Tuesday through Thursday, April 12, 2016 to April 14, 2016 for 3rd, 4th and 5th graders. The number of students listed for each mode is a daily average. Equity information What percentage of children that attend the priority school(s) are: Eligible to receive free and reduced -price meals 81.8% Racial/ethnic minorities 84.4% See the OSPI State Report Card searchable website for this information. Part 6: Additional Question for Multi -jurisdictional projects If the project involves roadways/lands owned or managed by multiple public agencies, please list additional jurisdictions below and provide supporting documentation demonstrating project concurrence. If the project is on a state route include WSDOT Region Administrator concurrence. Concurrence for this project: Other name: Date Title: Chief Engineer Address: 129 N. 2nd Street, Yakima, WA 98901 Phone: (509) 576-6797 Email: brett.sheffield@yakimawa.gov Other name: Date Title: Address: Phone: Email: Repeat as needed for additional concurrence. 2018 Pedestrian and Bicycle and Safe Routes to School Application for Funding Page 4 of 4