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07/17/2018 05C Council Public Safety Committe Report; Traffic Calming RecommendationBUSINESS OF THE CITY COUNCIL YAKIMA, WASHINGTON AGENDA STATEMENT 1 Item No. 5.C. For Meeting of: July 17, 2018 ITEM TITLE: Council Public Safety Committee report regarding the Community Integration Committee traffic calming recommendation SUBMITTED BY: Scott Schafer, Public Works Director SUMMARY EXPLANATION: At the May 24, 2018 Public Safety Committee meeting, council members directed staff to present the Committee's recommendation for changes in the traffic calming policy. The Public Safety Committee's recommendation reflects full adoption of the Integration Committee's suggested language. The Integration Committee reviewed this item per Council's request and based on the authority provided by Ordinance 2017-034 section 1.34.020. The recommendation has the following key elements: 1. Requirement of 30% of occupied parcels to initiate the study process 2. 70% of occupied parcels would be required to concur with traffic calming measures recommended by traffic study with no property requirement. The recommendation from the Public Works Department differs from the above outlined recommendation in the following manner: a. of the 70% needed in element 2 above, City would require 50% affirmation from property owners. ITEM BUDGETED: STRATEGIC PRIORITY: APPROVED FOR SUBMITTAL: NA Public Safety Acting City Manager STAFF RECOMMENDATION: Staff recommends Council direct staff to provide Public Safety Committee with an 8 and 18 month evaluation of the benefits and problems associated with the changed protocol. BOARD/COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION: 2 Public Safety Committee recommended a staff presentation to the full Council on July 17, 2018. ATTACHMENTS: Description Upload Date 0 memo 7/3/2018 Type Coker Memo 3 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 2301 Fruitvale Blvd., Yakima, Washington 98902 Phone (509) 575-6005 Memorandum June 25, 2018 To: Public Safety Committee and City Manager, Cliff Moore From: Ana Cortez, Assistant City Manager Scott Schafer, Director of Public Works Joe Rosenlund, Streets & Traffic Operations Manager Re: Proposed Traffic Calming Procedure The Public Safety Committee directed staff at its April meeting to bring forth our proposed Traffic -Calming Procedure to the Community Integration Committee for an evaluation to ensure the petition process is fair and equitable to all residents of Yakima. On May 14 and June 11, 2018, staff presented the attached Traffic -Calming proposal to the Community Integration Committee. The focus was on the "petitions" components of the proposal which have been highlighted. In accordance with the City's current procedure, only one petition step occurs; requiring "signatures of approval" from at least 51% of the Property Owners within the immediate affected area to officially begin the process with the City. Under the new proposal, to initiate the proposed traffic -calming process, a resident is now required to submit an "Initial Petition" to the City's Public Works Department with at least 30% signature approval of the residents living within the proposed area (one signature per parcel) for the process to begin. At this point in the process, it is not important if the signatures are obtained from property owners or residents. The City then reviews the concern and focuses on Education and Enforcement of the immediate area as first steps, prior to Engineering and the installation of permanent physical measures. Public Meetings will keep residents well informed. If it is determined that Engineering is necessary, a "Traffic Calming Petition" requiring 75% signature approval of which at least 50% must be Property Owners (one signature per parcel) is then required for the project to proceed. The Community Integration Committee discussed the neighborhood participation requirements in the proposed traffic calming procedures and offered the following recommendations to the Public Safety Committee: The proposed Initial Petition requiring 30% approval of residents within the area. The Community Integration Committee discussed whether a higher or lower percentage would be appropriate. Based on the need to establish a minimum level of concurrence by the neighborhood and current staffing levels to analyze the conditions and conduct the process, the Community Integration Committee decided that the 30% threshold was appropriate as long as vacant parcels were not included in the calculation. Administration 575-6005 • Engineering 575-6111 • Equipment Rental 575-6005 • Parks & Recreation 575-6020 • Refuse 575-6005 Street 575-6005 • Traffic 575-6005 • Transit 575-6005 • Wastewater/Stormwater 575-6077 • Water/Irrigation 575-6154 Yakima 1994 4 The proposed Traffic Calming Petition requiring 75% signature approval of which at least 50% must be Property Owners. The Community Integration Committee did have concerns regarding the higher endorsement level if engineering was required for the installation of physical devices if Education and Enforcement methods had not been successful in reducing speeds. The Community Integration Committee suggested that two-thirds (66.7%) of the parcels concur with no property owners required to agree to the plan. Some committee members wondered why there was a petition requirement for the construction of physical calming features at all. Their reasoning was that if there is a safety problem, the City should just fix it regardless of what percentage supports it. The Community Integration Committee also expressed concern regarding the public outreach and communication with the neighborhood residents. Specifically, how do we get our message out in a manner that relays the pertinent information to each neighborhood? They want to ensure that there is a good notification process in place and that staff is able to clearly communicate the issues, the process and potential remedies. They also want non-English speaking residents involved in the process; getting the same information. Staff Recommendations: Following the discussions with the Community Integration Committee, staff is comfortable in reducing the percentage of signature approval required for the Traffic Calming Petition when Engineering of physical devices becomes necessary from 75% to 70%. However, staff strongly recommends that a supermajority of signature approval for the Traffic Calming Petition be representative of property owners. This would help to avoid similar situations such as what we experienced on 53rd Avenue where a significant number of the parcels had new occupants between the time the petition was submitted and traffic calming measures were implemented. The property owners were not happy. The multiple Public Meetings should also help to mitigate this problem. With limited funding, in some cases it may be a year or more before implementation. Because the property owners have made significant investments within their respective neighborhoods, a commitment of approval needs to be established with them in order to proceed with the project. As such, the new proposal would be: 70% signature approval of which at least 50% must be Property Owners (one signature per parcel) is then required for the project to proceed. Staff also appreciates the idea of working closely with the Community Integration Committee to further develop its public outreach and communication process with the neighborhood residents. 5 Traffic Calming Procedure 1. To initiate the traffic -calming process, a resident submits an "Initial Petition" to the City's Public Works Department. The Initial Petition requires at least 30% signature approval of the residents living within the proposed area (one signature per parcel) for process to begin. If a council member asks for a traffic calming evaluation for a specific location in his/her district, this begins the Initial Petition process for the specified neighborhood; requiring at least 30% signature approval. 2. Within two weeks of receiving the Initial Petition, Public Works staff will endeavor to contact the requestor, following up on any needed details and/or other information. 3. Public Works' staff to conduct site visit to investigate the issue. 4. If no issues found; no action taken and City staff report back to requestor. 5. If issues are observed, City staff to focus on Education; City officials hold a Public Meeting. Education 1. City staff to focus on alerting residents and users of the roadway within the particular neighborhood by installing temporary signage and/or portable speed radar devices for a specific period of time. 2. City staff to monitor and follow up with the requestor to determine if improvements have been made. If so, determine what permanent solution such as signage should be installed and report back to requestor. If no improvement has been observed, City staff to focus on Enforcement. Enforcement 1. City staff to enlist the assistance of the Yakima Police Department to focus enforcement efforts within this particular area of concern. 2. City staff to monitor and follow up with the requestor to determine if improvements have been made. 3. If improvements have been made with no further issues; no further action to be taken by the City and staff will report back to requestor. 4. If further improvements are needed, City staff to proceed with Engineering of traffic -calming devices. 6 Engineering - Traffic -Calming Devices 1. Public Meeting is held by City officials • Goals/Objectives > Public Input > Initiation of "Traffic Calming Petition" o Requires 75% signature approval of which at least 50% must be Property Owners (one signature per parcel) within the defined project area for the project to proceed o If there is a potential for the project to cause a significant traffic shift to adjacent roadways, residents from the potentially impacted areas shall be invited to, the Public Meeting. 2. If project proceeds, City begins Data Collection/Field Work/Traffic Study 3. City reports back to Neighborhood of findings (supporting data) by written correspondence. 4. City applies Traffic Calming Criteria to determine best traffic calming measure > 85th percentile speeds between 5 and 10 mph over posted limit — focus on Education and Enforcement > 85th percentile speeds in excess of 10 mph — proceed with Engineering of Traffic -calming devices. o Considerations may be made for street width, lack or condition of sidewalks and school walk routes. > 3 -year collision history — more than one per year for three years - proceed with Engineering of traffic -calming devices, > Speeding traffic is identified as "cut through traffic" on local street. > Not a transit route or critical emergency route 5. City continues to prioritize project list based on funding availability and safety concerns/factors o Cul-de-sacs, loop roads or other similar designs do not qualify for City funding of traffic -calming measures. 6. Public Meeting is held by City officials • Proposed Scope of Work/Design • Goals/ Objectives • Public Input 7 7, Arweal Process with Public Works Director onclior City IVItmooer (if riecessorth 8. Final Review of Project 9. One month prior to traffic calming installation, written correspondence from City officials to neighborhood addressing: • Final Scope ofWorkfDesign • Estimated Start Date 10. Project Completion 11. City conducts Data Collection/Field Work on Completed Projec(Follow Up) • Determine if desired results were achieved. � Collect data to support Address anyvalid complaints � Revise or remove if necessary 8 Transportation and Streets Transportation Planning Public Works Engineering 400 W. Gowe St., Kent, WA 98032 Office Hours: Monday - Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Phone: 253-856-5500 Fax: 253-856-650o publicworkskentwa.gov Residential Traffic Calming Program Traffic conditions on residential streets can greatly affect neighborhood livability. The Residential Traffic Calming Program (RTCP) addresses neighborhood traffic safety concerns while partnering with citizens and/or community groups to become actively involved in the improvement process. • First, you'll want to identify the traffic concerns in your neighborhood • Next discuss possible solutions with your neighbors from the measures listed in the brochure • Fill out an online Citizen Action Request Form • A representative from the City will contact you directly Once the Citizen Action Request form is received, Public Works Transportation Engineering Staff will review your concerns and begin to collect data. We will also conduct a field review of the area. From this information, we will compile a Proposed Improvement Plan for the location and inform you of our findings and recommendations for Phase I solutions. This review takes approximately six to eight weeks from the date we receive your Citizen Action Request Form. rt‘raffic Calming Strategies: 2Phase Approach Phase Changing Driver Behavior After an Citizen Action ' equest has been made and a problem identification and data assessment has occurred (this step usually takes about 6-8 weeks), Engineering staff will meet with neighborhood residents to present initial data and recommendations. Staff and residents will agree upon which Phase 1 tools will be implemented. The length of time for this 9 step depends on residents' schedules and availability to participate. Possible Phase I Solutions: • Residential Speed Watch o Volunteers will use a radar gun to clock speeds and report back to the city. Warning notices will be mailed to speeders. • Speed Radar Trailer Board o A portable trailer equipped with a radar unit that detects the speed of passing vehicles and displays it on a digital reader board. This device shows drivers their actual speed as well as the posted speed limit, and encourages their compliance. • Speed Radar Display Sign o Placed in neighborhood by residents to remind drivers to slow down. • Pavement Markings o The painting of legends on the pavement. These may include centerlines, foglines, school crossings, and speed limits. • Signing o The posting of appropriate traffic control signs. These may include speed limit, parking, dead-end, and school signs. • Neighborhood Tr . c Safety Campaign o A newsletter mailed to your community. The newsletter explains volumes and speeds in your area, recommended traffic calming measures, traffic laws, and pedestrian safety. • Brush Trims o The trimming and removal of brush by homeowners or City crews to allow better sight distance. • Target Enforcement o Increased enforcement by the Kent Police Department. Next Steps Upon evaluation of Phase I, if studies indicate traffic speeds exceed the posted limit by in mph, residents may consider Phase II. Phase II: Physical Treatments The City will communicate with the entire neighborhood by mailing a questionnaire on traffic issues, including a request for volunteers to serve on a Residential Traffic Committee. The City will also mail ballots to residents to determine the level of community support. The ballot will describe the proposal included in the plan. 10 Design plans and cost estimates will be developed. Depending on available funding, the plan may be adjusted. Residents will be notified of the approved plan and provided details on the anticipated construction schedule. • Traffic Circles o Traffic circles are raised islands, placed at intersections, around which traffic circulates. They are good for calming intersections, especially within neighborhoods that have major concerns about speeds, traffic volumes, and safety. Pictured: Mill Creek Neighborhood, between James St and Smith St. The traffic circle was constructed in 2009. • Speed Humps o Generally considered the most traditional of traffic calming devices. Speed humps are raised devices, parabolic in shape, that are placed across a residential road in a series, to slow cars down. Pictured: Meadow Ridge area between ll4th Ave SE and Yo8th Ave SE. A total of four speed humps were constructed in 2006. 11 • Speed Cushions When traffic calming measures are desired on a primary emergency response route, a newer traffic calming device called a speed cushion may be appropriate. Speed cushions reduce vehicle speeds but avoid excessive damage to emergency vehicles. They are designed to allow the wider axles of fire engines and ambulances to straddle the cushions without slowing down while forcing smaller vehicles to ride up over the cushions with at least one set of wheels. Pictured: Erin Glade, just north of the 277th corridor off of 111th P1 SE. Speed Cushions were constructed in 2010 thru the City's Residential Traffic Calming Program. Erin Glade is a known emergency response route. A total of three speed cushions constructed to slow vehicles without slowing down emergency response times. 12 RESOLUTION NO. 28-11 A RESOLUTION of the City of Richland establishing criteria to be used in reviewing neighborhood speed and traffic calming requests. WHEREAS, the City receives requests from citizens to install speed bumps/humps or similar roadway features designed to reduce the speed of vehicles in their neighborhood; and WHEREAS, the City's traffic engineering and police patrol divisions work together to respond to these requests with the goal of applying consistent principles and practices aimed at ensuring safe conditions on the City's local streets; and WHEREAS, the City desires to establish a set of criteria on which to evaluate the need for constructing traffic calming devices in residential neighborhoods NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the City Council of the City of Richland as follows: Section 1.01 The City shall continue to use education, enforcement and engineering improvements when responding to neighborhood speed complaints from citizens. Section 1.02 The criteria used to determine the need and to prioritize locations where construction of traffic calming devices are warranted shall be: A. Speeding traffic from outside of a neighborhood (cut through traffic) B. Speed problem is on a local street (not collectors or arterials) C. 85th percentile speed of 35 mph or higher (this is for a 25 mph local street) D. A crash history of five or more accidents within the last 3 years in the area of concern E. Not a high use school or transit bus route F. 70% majority of area residents in favor of installing traffic calming device(s) A street meeting A, B, C, E and F will qualify for installation of traffic calming devices and initiate the process of identifying the cost and available funding for the selected solution, Criteria D may be substituted for criteria C for the purposes of qualifying for traffic calming devices, except that a street meeting criteria D will initiate a focused safety review by the City that may result in a different focus than speed nnitigation. Section 1.03 This resolution shall take effect immediately. Adopted 6/21/2011 1 Resolution No. 28-11 13 ADOPTED by the City Council of the City of Richland at a regular meeting on the 21st day of June, 2011. ATTEST: `41 4019r10401°,1:•;..1...4r....#1.4. 0/ MARCIA HOPK N wile* At AMIN 4:11N(P' APPROVED AS TO FO M: THOMAS 0. LAM SON City Clerk City Attorney Adopted 6/21/2011 2 Resolution No. 28-11 14 0 , 0' http://www.kenmorewa.gov/trafficcalming Home » Kenmore in Action » Departments » Public Works » Neighborhood Traffic Calming Program • About Kenmore • Contact Us • Departments • City Manager's Office • Development Services • Finance & Administration • Fire & EMS • Community Development • Police • Public Works • Transportation • Officials Neighborhood Traffic Calming Program The City recognizes that residential streets occasionally have higher speeds and traffic volumes due to shifting traffic patterns and new developments. Isolated, occasional and daily conditions of high speed can affect neighborhood livability. With help from citizens and the City's efforts in education, enforcement, and engineering, these concerns can be addressed. View the City of Kenmore Traffic Speed Mitigation Policy flowchart. Citizen involvement and data collection are integral parts of all traffic calming projects. The people who live and work in the area of concern have the opportunity to become actively involved in the planning and decision making process. The City takes regular traffic speed data on arterial roadways and has been collecting speed data on residential roadways in response to concerns. You can check to see if speed on your street has recently been measured here. What is the Neighborhood Traffic Calming Program? The Neighborhood Traffic Calming Program addresses neighborhood traffic concerns identified by citizens and/or community groups. Through active participation by citizens, we can identify the problem, plan the approach, implement solutions, and evaluate their effectiveness. The City's traffic calming toolbox includes three categories of solutions referred to as the three Es: Education, Enforcement, and Engineering. • Education alerts citizens to ways they can help ease traffic problems in their own neighborhoods. This can include temporary radar devices, direct mail campaigns, newsletter articles and temporary signage. • Enforcement enlists the help of the Police Department to focus enforcement efforts on the area of concern and increase community awareness of speeding problems through their presence. • Engineering tools include a variety of traffic calming physical devices that can reduce speed or improve safety. These tools are used only after a data -driven analysis and pursuit of the other two "E"s in an attempt to alleviate the problem. The City will look to citizens to help identify specific neighborhood characteristics that should be taken into account when identifying solutions. Solutions will be evaluated to ensure that they serve all neighborhood users, do not negatively affect emergency access and other public services, and, in the case of physical devices, have support of a majority of the residents who will be affected. 15 ^ Pedestrian and bicycle safety and mobility barriers In the case of each of these situations, citizens should notify the city, and this will initiate the process. A Citizen Action Request may be submitted via the online form on the city website, by phone or by fihling out a form at the front desk. Collection of data will be scheduled by the city, and after tabulation and analysis of the data on recorded speeds and volumes, citizens will be involved in the selection of tools that are appropriate to alleviate any excessive speeds or imbalanced volumes. What can be done now to address vehicle speed concerns in residential areas? ~ Neighborhood Speed Watch Program: This program allows citizens the opportunity to check out a radar unit and record the speeds of vehicles traveling in their neighborhood. Radar units available include both a handheld radar gun and a radar • Speed radar trailer: A portable trailer equipped wita radar unit which detects the speed of passing vehicles and displays it on a digital reader board. This device shows drivers their "actual speed versus the posted speed limit and encourages their compliance. • Radar guns: Handheld devices which allow citizens to determine and record the actual speeds of vehicles on their strets. Requires the use af safety equipment to notify drivers of the citizen speed watch to ensure the safety of drivers and neighbors. Neighborhood Newsletter: This program involves a personalized newsletter mailed to your community. The newsletter explains traffic volumes and speeds in your area, refreshes citizens on traffic laws and pedestrian safety, and encourages compliance. ° Target Enforcement: Increased enforcement by the Police Department, Traffic section. What can be done in the future? If data collection confirms an issue of excessive speeds, volumes, or rate of collisions, the installation of traffic control devices will be considered. Each of these devices is unique and specilic criteria have been established for when and where they may be used. Physical in -road devices can also have other impacts on emergency services, neighborhood noise, and diversion of trafflc to other nearby routes. Other tools for addressing concerns can include road striping revisions, street signage revisions and operational revisions. Use of the most appropriate tools is determined by traffic engineering analysis by city staif. Vehicle volume thresholds in the collected data must be between 300 and 3000 vehicles per day to be considered in the Calming Program. Volumes outside of this range are either too low for devices to be effective when compared with ° 16 ▪ The engineering standard for assessing speed on a road is the speed at which 85% of all vehic!es are measured to be at or below. This is ca!Ied the 85th percentile speed. This speed is higher than the average speed of all vehicles and encompasses the majority of all drivers. See if traffic on your street has recently been measured here. • 85th percentile speeds between 5 and 10 miles per hour over the posted limit are of concern, but are stronger candidates for educatiori and enforcement before physical changes are considered. • 85th percentile speeds in excess of 10 miles per hour over the posted limit are considered excessive and are good candidates for physical changes after an engineering analysis of the roadway. ^ High rate of 3 -year collision history ° A collision rate of more than one per year for the Iast three years is considered to be of concern and would Iead to an analysis for physical changes. Based on the data collected and the topography of the area, tools to address traffic concerns may be recommended. Any recommended action will be based on sound engineering and planning principles. Safety remains paramount in the decision-making process, including access for public safety vehicles. To ensure there is consensus among citizens that would be directly affected by these changes and the potential impacts they may have, neighborhood meetings will be held and majority support (60%) is required before proceeding with construction of the physical devices. How does this program differ from the Neighborhood Transportation Plans The Neighborhood TrnuportationP|mnoPmgnom<NTPP>.dhndmoi|uofwhiohuanbohuundat this link, is a collaborative engagement of citizens within defined Kenmore neighborhoods to address traffic and mobility problems proactively. The NTPP will be collecting input primarily in late 2015 and into early 2016. There may be issues which are not raised during this process, or which occur after this process which are candidates for the Calming program. During the initial rollout of the NTPP, requests to engage in the Calming program will be directed to the NTPP. The Calming program will revert to being the primary means of addressing citizen concerns following the completion of the NTPP for each Kenmore neighborhood. 11 googleplus 0 0 21 17 TRAFFIC CALMING PROGRAM POLICY Citizen Action Request The citizen requesting action or expressing a concern will be asked to complete a Citizen Action Request Form. When completing the form, descriptive items are helpful such as: time of day, type of vehicies, specific location, concern for pedestrians and cyclists, concern for parked vehicles, vehicles entering the roadway or motorists losing control of their vehicles, etc. First Response Level City staff will prepare an initial response acknowledging receipt of the request and identifying the immediate action that will be taken. The immediate action may include researching the issue, a field trip to the site, or referral to another entity. The requestor should also be informed if the problem has been previously reviewed and any actions taken. Second Response Levet City staff will investigate the request, looking into any data on hand to support the area of concern such as previously conducted speed studies and historical collision database searches. City staff will make a field visit to the site or virtual investigation using mapping software to observe existing geometric and physical conditions. Observatioris wil! be niade of existing signage and striping. Observations wiH be made of any in-place speed control devices on this or any connected, neighboring streets that could be causing traffic diversion. If one or rnore of the foliowing existsthen action will be deferred: °v The street is an arterial. Based on Iimited resources and the need for rnore exterisive speed control measures on arterials due to higher volumes, the City has focused its efforts on residential streets for this program, City staif will inform the Police Chief of the concern and ask for some additional traffic enforcement. City staff will record the request and continue to monitor the situation. Concerns on arterials may be factored into future Capital Improvement Plan (CIP) budgets and identificatlon of projects. • Historical speed data records less than three years old show speeds that do not meet the criteria, described below, for concern and/or the street has had less than three complaints about speeds from different households in the past three years. ThIs may be an isolated occurrence or precursor to a continuing problem and City staff will record the request and continue to monitor. The Street may be scheduled for future speed data collection if resources are available and existing data is outdated or unavailable. °m Historical volume records less than three years old show volumes less than 300 or greater than 3000vehicles per day. Streets with Iess than 300 vehicles are more effectively addressed through education and enforcement due to very low volumes. Streets with more than 3000 vehicles should be considered as arterials. 18 • The street isolocal access street less than 600 feet long with a cul-de-sac. City staff will verify that the appropriate traffic control signage exists at the nearest intersection. This signage, combined with the short length of the streetshould mitigate the problem. However, City staif will record the request and continue to monitor. * The request appears to be an issue between two individuals. City staff will refer the matter to the Police Chief and continue to monitor. Excessive Speed Criteria The 85th percentile speed is an accepted engineering practice which evaluates streetsbased on the speed that 85 percent of all vehicles were measured at or below. This speed is above the average speed of all vehicles, and encompasses a majority of all drivers on a roadway. If the 85th percentile speed is 5 miles per hour or lesabove the posted speed limit, no action is required. This is considered to be within the limits of human and instrument error and indicates that drivers are following the posted speed limits. If the 85th percentile speed,is between 5 and 10 miles per hour over the posted speed limit, education and enforcement measuressuch as a neighborhood watch progrm using radar devices available at City Hall for citizens to check out, would be warranted. Neighbors would be encouraged to visit each other and express concern for problem; newsletters could also be sent out regarding the problem. The Police would be notified of the concern in the area and perform additional enforcement when resources allow. If the 85th percentile speed is 10 miles per hour or more over the posted speed limit, speeds are considered excesive. City staff will request traffic enforcement from the Police Chief. City staif will also analyze the available traffic calming tools, including physical devices, revisions to striping and signage, and operational revisions, to address the concern. If one of the following exists, then the City would proceed to the third response level: * Historical automated traffic counter data less than three years old shows 85th percentile speeds that exceed 10 miles per hour over the posted limit. o Streets with high volumes of pedestrians and cyclists, on Safe Routes to School, or with a higher population of other vulnerable non -motorized users will be considered for the third response level with 85th percentile speeds between 5 and 10 miles per hour over the posted limit. • There have been more than three requests for action from different households in the past three years � The Police Chief requests action to be taken after additional enforcement = Three or more reported traffic collisions in the past three years. 19 Third Response Level At the third response level, the City will consider physical revisions to the roadway, including in -road physical devicesstriping and signirig, and operational revisions in an effortto reduce speeds. Examples of devices that could be instaHed include: w Traffic humps, cushions and raised crosswalks: mounded pavement material that spans the roadway, approximately 4 to 6 inches above the existing surfaceforces slow -downs and can provide an improved pedestrian crosin0. These devices have a significant impact on emergency service response times, and can cause increased noise to neighboring properties. Curb extensions: construction of landscaped appendages on the side of the street narrowing the street width to one or two lanes, both at intersections and mid -block. These devices reduce crossing width for pedestrians. � Traffic circles: a small circular island placed in the center of a street intersection forcing traffic to make a slow turn around it. These devices can have a signfflcant impact on emergency service and deIvery vehicles. Chicane: a narrowing and twisting of the roadway for several hundred feet using curbs and Iandscaping within the existing right-of-way. These devices can have a significant impact on emergency service and delivery vehicles. The City will consider the presence of Safe Routes to School routes, designated or highly used cyclist routes, the characteristics of the concern and the characteristics of the neighborhood when analyzing streets for traffic calming devices orother physical changes. Engineering analysis of potential changes will consider: • The likely impact ofthe change to address the concern � Impacts to emergency services ~^ Impacts to neighboring streets that may see diversion lmpacts to transit service Changes will be made in a context -sensitive manner and will seek neighborhood consensus prior to iristallation of changes. Any in -road physical device wiD require a neighborhood petition with 60% approval of residents within% mile of the device, and 75% approval of residents immediately adjacent to the device. The City will pursue temporary changes whenever possible, and will evaluate all changes after a minimum of 90 days for effectively addressing the concern. Temporary changes that are effective may be changed to permanerit installations if warranted after the minimum 90 day period. Updated: July 342D25 j No action Monitor/Revisit Updated 7/31/15 City of Kenmore Traffic Calming Policy Flowchart Citizen Request 1 Staff researches or obtains data ' Speeds acceptable No collisions Speeds of concern tew;collislon:s. Excesive speeds High rate of cdllisions Education Enforcement Evaluate Physical Changes ! Education Enforcement Monitor/Revisit Z 0 O C !D m Implement physical changes Monitor effectiveness I. 4 I Evaluate Physical I Changes 20 Neighborhood Traffic Calming Program Scott Schafer Public Works Director Distributed at the Meeting J,')( `)L Pending Traffic Catmint Requests Street N 53rd Ave N 55th Ave Cornell Ave Chestnut St S 56th Ave N 11th Ave Pleasant Ave Cornell Ave S 63rd Ave Coolidge Rd Swan Ave N 24th Ave S 17th Ave S 51st Ave From Englewood Ave Chestnut St Washington Ave 56th Ave Arlington St Yakima Ave Tieton Dr Logan Ave Walnut St 92nd Ave 18th St Summitview Ave Tieton Dr Nob Hill Blvd To Scenic Dr Summitview Ave Pierce Ave 60th Ave Tieton Dr Summitview Ave St Helens St Mead Ave Chestnut St 96th Ave 19th St Lincoln Ave Chestnut St Arlington St Submission Date 01/01/16 09/08/16 01/23/18 03/28/17 07/11/17 07/17/17 08/17/17 09/27/17 12/11/17 03/08/18 05/01/18 05/07/18 05/15/18 05/21/18 No action Monitor/ Revisit City of Yakima Traffic Calming Flowchart Initial Petition (30% Approval) Staff Evaluates Speeds acceptable No collisions Speeds of Concern few Collisions Excessive speeds High rate of Collisions Education Enforcement Evaluation Physical Changes Education Enforcement Monitor/Revisit Public Meeting Traffic Calming Petition (70% Approval) Public Meeting Implement Physical Changes Monitor Effectiveness Evaluate Physical Changes 3 Traffic Calming Options Chicane between intersections Speed Cushion Traffic Circle without Landscaping Radar Sign Speed Hump Traffic Signs 4