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2-22-18 PSC agenda packet Council Public Safety Committee 2nd Floor Conference Room City Hall February 22, 2018 3:00 p.m. Members: Staff: Others: Councilmember D. Gutierrez (chair) City Manager Cliff Moore Councilmember Coffey Police Chief Dominic Rizzi Councilmember Mendez Fire Chief Bob Stewart Councilmember Hill (alternate) City Prosecutor Cynthia Martinez Brad Coughenour Scott Schafer Agenda 1. Approval of January 30, 2017 minutes 2. New Business a. Proposed parking legislation amendment - Goosman b. Traffic calming procedure revision – Schafer c. 7th Annual Gang Prevention & Intervention Conference – Gutierrez 3. Old Business a. Speaking points for joint Yakima City Council/Yakima School District meeting b. Comprehensive Community Safety Plan for the City of Yakima Vision 2025 - Cortez c. Public forum planning d. Domestic violence i. Legislative action 4. Other Business 5. Information items 6. Recap of future agenda items 7. Audience Participation Council Public Safety Committee January 30, 2018 MINUTES Members present: Staff: Councilmember Dulce Gutierrez (chair) Asst. City Mgr. Ana Cortez Councilmember Kathy Coffey Chief Dominic Rizzi, Police Councilmember Carmen Mendez Deputy Chief Pat Reid, Fire Scott Schafer, Public Works Prosecutor Cynthia Martinez, Legal Terri Croft, Police Members of Public: Tony Coursey Joe Willis James Turner The meeting was called to order at 10:30 a.m. 1. Approval of minutes of December 7, 2017 It was MOVED by Gutierrez and SECONDED by Coffey to approve the minutes as presented. Motion PASSED unanimously. 2. New Business 2.a. Elect Committee Chair Mendez MOVED to nominate Gutierrez as chair for 2018. Motion was SECONDED by Coffey. Gutierrez accepted the nomination and motion was PASSED unanimously. 2.b. Determine 2018 meeting dates/times The committee decided to keep the meetings scheduled on the 4th Friday of the month at 3:00 p.m. in the 2nd floor conference room. 2.c. Governor’s Yakima budget proviso Cortez reported that staff is optimistic funding can be secured under the Governor’s supplemental budget request. There was an understanding that the funding was contingent upon utilizing the Denver model, however it has been determined that it not a requirement. We can take elements from that model and adapt them to best suit our needs. Cortez introduced a draft of the Comprehensive Community Safety Plan for the City of Yakima. In November the committee had requested a comprehensive status report regarding gang violence, however, in compiling the information, other areas of community safety were identified that were relevant to the report. Cortez noted that the report was still in draft form and input had not been received from all partners. She summarized the report with an explanation of the current conditions, which would set a baseline for determining future improvement; the National Citizen Survey, which noted 31% of residents indicated an overall feeling of safety – would like to see that increased to 55-60% by 2025; neighborhood forums and the outcomes of those; the vision statement; desired changes; programs and activities; and operational models. She discussed the importance of incorporating the media, evaluators, and capacity building into the operational model. Cortez asked the committee for approval to convene a meeting of the partners to review, update, and finalize the report. The committee was appreciative for the report and found the information to be excellent. They asked that the request for approval to meet with partners be presented at the Thursday council briefing meeting, as they felt all council members should be apprised of the report and included in the request. Gutierrez asked if the report would be going directly to council after meeting with the partners. Cortez stated the intent was to present to the full council at the end of February or beginning of March after meeting with the partners. She advised she would draft a cover memo for the Thursday briefing indicating the request for input. Coffey suggested she include the timeline and desired outcomes, and that the intention is to prepare a document that will be delivered to our legislators. Gutierrez also requested input from Prosecutor Martinez. Coffey requested information on the cost and availability to do an update to the 2015 National Citizen Survey. Cortez noted some issues with the specific methodology used in the last survey and suggested possibly redoing the survey, however it was determined that would make it difficult to compare information between surveys. 2.d. Firefighter live fire burns Reid advised of a state requirement for firefighters to train annually on a live fire burn. The fire department is having difficulty scheduling these burns due to issues with the Clean Air Authority. The fire department is requesting a letter from Council authorizing them to work with the Clean Air Authority to accommodate this required training. Mendez made a recommendation to send this issue to the full council for approval. She noted that she would not be available to attend the February 8 Clean Air Authority meeting but would ensure that her alternate, Councilmember Funk, was aware of the issue and could advocate on behalf of the fire department at that meeting. Coffey concurred and Gutierrez inquired if there were any costs associated with the request. Reid advised there were not. It was MOVED by Mendez and SECONDED by Coffey to move the issue to the full council under committee comments at the February 6 meeting. Motion PASSED unanimously. 2.e. 2018 FEMA SAFER grant Reid requested on behalf the fire department authorization to solicit a grant for ballistic protections for firefighters. If authorized and the grant was received, the 25% required to be paid by the City would be included in the fire department’s 2019 budget allocation and would not be an additional funding request. Coffey felt it was important to move this safety issue forward as soon as possible. Committee consensus was to forward the issue to the full Council at the February 6th meeting. 2.f. Private Ambulance Dispatch Fees Reid reported that the fire department and SunComm had previously requested a fee be implemented for the private ambulance companies who are dispatched by SunComm. At the time, the discussions were tabled with the intention of the stakeholders reconvening for further discussions. The ambulance companies were asked to provide a counter proposal to the fee recommendation. Several months later, the county fire commissioners issued a letter determining that the private ambulance companies should not be responsible for any financial contributions to the operation. He noted that the county fire commissioners have no governance over SunComm operations. He requested that the issue be brought back to the full council for consideration. Gutierrez noted that the issue was voted down by the full council. Coffey stated that she had been in support of the fee previously and still supports the fee. Mendez also continues to support the fee imposition. Gutierrez asked Rizzi what his stance was. Rizzi supports the fee imposition, as the full cost is currently being born by the cities. It was MOVED by Coffey and SECONDED by Mendez to move the issue back to the full council for consideration. Motion PASSED. 3. Old Business 3.a. Forum planning Gutierrez advised a 6th forum is currently being planned after discussion with the full council permitted an extension into the current year. Looking to hold forums at Lewis & Clark Middle School and McClure Elementary, and there is a request from Councilmember Funk for one in her district. The committee is looking for direction as to how many more months the forums should continue, what the end point should be so the information gathered at the forums can be summarized to implement, and additional dates so outreach can start. Mendez advised she would coordinate dates with Gutierrez after the meeting, as both the current requests are in her district. Coffey requested that the dates be selected prior to the Thursday council briefing. It was agreed to select dates and put the item on the council briefing agenda so consent could be obtained from the other council members to proceed. Cortez advised she would e- mail the council members to get any additional requests for forums. 3.b. Domestic Violence Martinez reported that Legal staff had applied for a technical assistance grant through the American Prosecutors Association to start diversion programs to address domestic violence crimes. The programs would incorporate moral recognition therapy programs and give Yakima the opportunity to try something new to address domestic violence. She advised Seattle is trying a 6 week moral recognition therapy program. There would also be possibility of victim treatments through the YWCA and another partner. Coffey discussed the legislative possibilities that were shared with our legislators before they went into session. Coffey urged the committee members to press the legislative committee to meet early and get this item before our legislators. Mendez is on the legislative committee and feels the committee can be more proactive and identify legislators who will sponsor a bill. Coffey requested that legislative action be placed as a sub topic under domestic violence for future Public Safety Committee meetings. Gutierrez would like to look into getting the 6 week treatment program in Yakima, as well as getting healthcare to cover the treatment. She would also like to look into enhanced sentencing. 4. Other Business 4.a. Fire Operations 101 training Mendez asked Reid if the fire department would be providing the fire ops 101 training for council. Reid advised this would be discussed with the city manager and that the fire department would like to offer it on an annual basis. They are currently looking for a Saturday in the spring to hold one. 4.b. Juvenile Justice Partnership Council update Gutierrez briefed the committee on the first quarter Juvenile Justice Partnership Council meeting at Green Hills School. The council is working with youths who have been in the criminal justice system. There have been efforts to raise the age for juvenile rehabilitation limits from 21 to 25 to provide additional support. She reported that there are a lot of Yakima youths housed at Green Hills. They expressed concern to her for their release back to Yakima due to the inability to get away from their gang ties. Gutierrez offered to share the information provided to the council members to anyone who would like to review it. 4.c. Dispute Resolution Center Gutierrez reported that the group is working through de-escalation and communications skills with differing persons. There are many community partners participating in this process, providing many different perspectives. 4.d. March joint meeting with Yakima School District The joint meeting of the Yakima City Council and Yakima School District is scheduled for March. It was suggested that the committee should discuss potential agenda items and “asks” of the school district at the February Public Safety Committee. Mendez would like to see a willingness from the school district to keep the schools open after school hours and plan to make that happen. Coffey suggested that our issues be sent forward to the council briefing to add to the council meeting agenda. She also suggested the Street by Streets report be distributed to council members to use as a prototype. 5. Information items No information items. 6. Recap of Future Agenda Items  Speaking points for joint school district meeting  Report on costs to update/redo community survey  Domestic Violence legislation  Public forum planning 7. Audience Participation James Turner spoke about his efforts to have a speed bump or traffic calming measure installed in the area Cornell and S. 7th Avenue. He has been working with Scott Schafer from Public Works and will continue to take all necessary steps as he is directed. Schafer noted that Public Works would be presenting a revision of the traffic calming measure process to the February Public Safety Committee meeting. 8. Adjournment The meeting was adjourned at 11:43 a.m. Approved: BUSINESS OF THE CITY COUNCIL YAKIMA, WASHINGTON AGENDA STATEMENT Item No. ______ For Meeting of: March 6, 2018 ITEM TITLE: relating to Traffic; amending the Yakima Municipal Code, Ch. 9.50, Parking and Rules of the Road, and Ch. 9.60, Enforcement, adding a prohibition of parking a motor vehicle in front of a mailbox. SUBMITTED BY: Brooke Goosman, Assistant City Attorney CONTACT PERSON/TELEPHONE: Brooke Goosman: 509-575-6033 SUMMARY EXPLANATION: The City of Yakima Municipal Code Chapter 9.50, Parking and Rules of the Road, should be amended to add language prohibiting parking a motor vehicle within 15 feet of a mailbox. Mail delivery services are impeded by motor vehicles parked in front of mailboxes. There have been increased complaints regarding this issue and this amendment will address these complaints, and allow for a civil parking infraction to be issued. The City of Yakima Municipal Code Chapter 9.60, Enforcement, should be amended to include the $20 penalty for parking within 15 feet of a mailbox. Resolution Ordinance ____X______Contract Other(Specify) Contract Mail to (name and address): Phone: Funding Source APPROVED FOR SUBMITTAL: _____ City Manager STAFF RECOMMENDATION: Pass Ordinance. BOARD/COMMISSION RECOMMENDATION: COUNCIL ACTION: 1  ORDINANCE NO. 2018-____ AN ORDINANCE relating to Traffic; amending the City of Yakima Municipal Code, Section 9.50.085, and adding language prohibiting parking a motor vehicle in front of a mailbox; also amending Section 9.60.030 to include the penalty for this parking infraction. BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY OF YAKIMA: Section 1. Chapter 9.50, Section 9.50.085 of the Yakima Municipal Code is hereby amended to read as follows: Chapter 9.50 PARKING AND RULES OF THE ROAD 9.50.085 Stopping, standing, or parking prohibited in specified places. (1) Except when necessary to avoid conflicts with other traffic, or in compliance with law or the directions of a police officer or official traffic-control device, no person shall stop, stand or park a vehicle: (a) On any part of a sidewalk at any time; or (b) Within the vision clear view triangle defined in YMC 15.05.040, at any time; or (c) Between any sidewalk and the curb or edge of the paved roadway between ten p.m. and seven a.m.; or (d) Within 15 feet of a clearly visible mailbox which is located directly adjacent to a curbside or on a public right-of-way, between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., except on Sundays and holidays. (Ord. 2015-030 § 1, 2015: Ord. 97-25 § 1, 1997). Section 2. Chapter 9.60, Section 9.60.030 of the Yakima Municipal Code is hereby amended to read as follows: Chapter 9.60 ENFORCEMENT 9.60.030 Penalties. Unless another penalty is provided by ordinance of the city, every person convicted of a misdemeanor defined by this title or a violation of any provision of this title shall be punished by a fine of not more than five hundred dollars or by imprisonment in the city jail facility for not more than ninety days, or by both such fine and imprisonment. Further, for all violations of traffic infractions as defined by RCW 46.63.020, and prohibited by this chapter the monetary penalty for the commission thereof shall be as made and provided for under the provisions of RCW 46.63.110. The monetary penalties for parking infractions in the city shall be as follows: 2  VIOLATION: YMC/RCW: FINE: Over time limit—2-hour zone 9.50.070/9.50.075 $20.00 Over time limit—2-hour core business district 9.50.080 20.00 Over time limit—30-minute zone 9.50.090 20.00 Over time limit—15-minute zone 9.50.095 20.00 Over time limit—city lots 9.50.215 20.00 No parking 3:00—5:00 a.m. 9.50.060 20.00 In alley (residential/business) 9.50.010 20.00 More than 12″ from curb 9.50.015 20.00 Right-hand wheels parallel to and beyond 12″ from the curb 9.50.015 20.00 Head-in parking only 9.50.130 20.00 City lots permits required 9.50.230 20.00 Motorcycles only 9.50.020 20.00 Bus zone 46.61.570 20.00 Taxi zone 46.61.570 20.00 Sidewalk/planting strip 46.61.570 20.00 Loading zone (people/merchandise) 46.61.570 20.00 Within 15 feet of a mail box 9.50.085 20.00 Blocking traffic 46.61.570 20.00 Driveway safety zone 46.61.570 20.00 Within 15 feet of a fire hydrant 46.61.570 20.00 Within 20 feet of a crosswalk 46.61.570 20.00 Handicap stall violation 46.16.381 250.00 (Ord. 2005-79 § 1, 2005: Ord. 2735 § 2 (part), 1983). Section 3. This ordinance shall be in full force and effect 30 days after its passage, approval, and publication as provided by law and by the City Charter. PASSED BY THE CITY COUNCIL, signed and approved this 6th day of March, 2018. ATTEST: Kathy Coffey, Mayor Sonya Claar Tee, City Clerk Publication Date: Effective Date:           To: Public Safety Committee and City Manager, Cliff Moore From: Ana Cortez, Assistant City Manager Scott Schafer, Public Works Director Date: February 14, 2018 Subject: Traffic-Calming Procedure Revision The City of Yakima generally receives one inquiry for traffic-calming measures per week from the public, translating to approximately five submitted petitions per year. The City currently requires “signatures of approval” from at least 51% of the property owners within the immediate affected area to officially begin the process. If City determines that a calming measure is needed, the process usually takes about one year from the time a petition is submitted until traffic-calming measures (typically speed humps) are actually installed. Budget reductions within the Streets/Traffic Division have negatively impacted the City’s ability to address traffic-calming requests. Most notably has been the loss of two key Traffic Tech II positions in 2014/2015. Those positions were able to conduct traffic reviews and counts in a timely manner; helping to expedite the process. With reduced budgets and the loss of the Traffic Tech II positions, it is challenging for the Street/Traffic Division to both fund traffic- calming projects and to timely provide the necessary traffic reviews/studies. Currently there is no dedicated funding allocated to traffic-calming projects within the Streets Division budget. Funding to cover such projects is diverted from the limited Street Maintenance budget. In 2017, a total of $375,000 was allocated to street maintenance ($100,000 from the General Fund and $275,000 from REET 2) to address pothole repair, crack-sealing, paving and other maintenance activities. The City appropriated $450,000 for the same use in 2018. To understand street maintenance, it is important to recognize the conditions of our streets. The City’s pavement condition index (PCI) provides a metric for measuring the quality or condition of city streets. Yakima’s PCI is currently at 63 (out of 100) indicating that City crews have done a fair job of maintaining streets. However, diverting more funds away from actual street maintenance negatively impacts pavement conditions/PCI. As such, traffic-calming projects are typically delayed until the end of the construction year to determine remaining funding availability. To address these concerns in 2018, staff has dedicated $30,000 to proposed traffic-calming projects ($25,000 from Street Maintenance and $5,000 from Traffic). These funds should cover the cost of some required traffic reviews/studies along with some actual installation of the traffic- calming measures (labor/materials). Staff will execute and prioritize Traffic-calming projects be based on funding availability and safety concerns. Limited funding caps the number of projects staff can complete each year. Traffic-calming is an important component of public safety; it needs dedicated funding that complements street maintenance appropriations. To increase our capacity to collect traffic data, we are seeking a formal partnership with Yakima Valley College. We want to offer traffic internships to Engineering YVC students; this innovative approach hopes to not only build better partnerships with the college, reinforce learning among Yakima students, but also, increase the City’s capacity to be more responsive to traffic calming requests. Another concern came to light recently with the controversial installation of speed humps within a particular neighborhood. It became abundantly clear that revisions to the City’s current procedure for traffic-calming was needed. It was identified that the following crucial elements were needed to develop a successful procedure:  Petition - Increased percentage of property owners required (75% approval)  Traffic review/studies/follow ups  Public meetings with neighborhoods/public input  Appeal process Attached is the proposed revisions to the City’s Traffic-Calming Procedure, which increase the City’s capacity to effectively address public requests for traffic-calming and to properly implement determined traffic-calming measures. The provided revision includes that the “proposed projects” list will continually be reassessed and prioritized by staff based on funding availability and safety concerns/factors. We feel that by allocating a specific amount of funding for traffic-calming projects, in conjunction with revising our traffic-calming procedure to include traffic reviews/studies and public meetings, allows the City to properly address public safety within our neighborhoods. 7th Annual May 7 & 8, 2018 Los Angeles - California TICKETS ARE ON SALE NOW! 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